5

Let me use an example:

func WaitForStringOrTimeout() (string, error) {
  my_channel := make(chan string)
  go WaitForString(my_channel)

  select {
  case found_string := <-my_channel:
    return found_string, nil
  case  <-time.After(15 * time.Minute):
    return nil, errors.New("Timed out waiting for string")
  }
}

In this simple example, I have some function WaitForString which blocks for awhile and eventually may return a string. I want to wrap WaitForString with this code which either returns the same string or times out with an error.

If a string is found quickly, is there still a goroutine running with a 15 minute sleep statement somewhere or is this garbage collected somehow?

If the timeout occurs and a string is never found, is there still a goroutine running WaitForString, even though there are no other routines that could observe it's output? What if WaitForString allocates a lot of memory but never returns?

Is there some way I can make WaitForString() become aware of the timeout occurring and give up?

4
  • 1
    Yes, it will keep running even if the output channel is closed. The timeout detection should live in WaitForString, I don't think there's a way to clean up the goroutine by wrapping it.
    – az_
    Feb 18 '14 at 2:10
  • Sure, I could modify WaitForString(), but this is a simple example. What if the 2nd case isn't a timeout but is instead WaitForOtherString(). I only need to wait until one of them finishes. Then I'm stuck again as I still need a function "above" both of these two with the select statement. How can I stop the slower goroutine?
    – Gregable
    Feb 18 '14 at 2:28
  • 1
    Ultimately you need to manage the interruptions yourself. Have a look at play.golang.org/p/bpOGkIN9Ng for instance. WaitForString() needs to be aware that it may be interrupted, and there needs to be a mechanism to interrupt it. Maybe you can use panic/recover as well.
    – az_
    Feb 18 '14 at 3:17
  • This is what I was worried about. So, if WaitForString accepted an exit channel, but then called into other functions which could block, I'd need to create another channel for each of those functions, call them inside a select with all of the harnessing you show in your demo, and then tell them to exit early.
    – Gregable
    Feb 18 '14 at 3:33
3

In general, no there isn't a way to stop another goroutine. There is a runtime.Goexit function that can be used to cause the current goroutine to exit (even if called from a deep call frame), but nothing to cause other goroutines to exit.

For the specific case of the time module, there isn't a separate goroutine handling each timer or ticker: instead, timers are centrally managed by the runtime so it can tell when it next needs to wake up.

While there's no goroutine hanging around, the channel and a small bookkeeping struct will stick around for the 15 minutes.

If this is a problem, consider using time.NewTimer instead of time.After, and manually stop the timer when you return. For example:

t := time.NewTimer(15 * time.Minute)
defer t.Stop()
select {
case found_string := <-my_channel:
    return found_string, nil
case  <-t.C:
    return nil, errors.New("Timed out waiting for string")
}

time.After is really useful for exact periodic behaviour, whereas time.NewTimer works fine for simple timeouts.

2
  • Related, Does this mean that I the time module is something that I couldn't implement in go? IE: Is it possible for me to write a goroutine that operates the same way as the timer and gets woken up by something external to the code?
    – Gregable
    Feb 19 '14 at 0:53
  • You could probably implement something similar with syscall.Select: the point being that if you have two timers set to expire in 1 second and 2 seconds respectively, you don't need two goroutines to wake them: instead you could have one goroutine that waits for 1 second and then wakes the first timer, and then waits another second to wake the second one. Managing this kind of data structure can be a little more complex, but it is doable. Feb 19 '14 at 1:00

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.