9

I want to take backup of a particular key in my redis which have multiple keys. My redis has many keys and I don't want to take full backup of my redis data. I have been going through http://redis.io/commands. There I found that there is a command dump by which I can take the dump of a specific key as follows:

 redis> dump "myKey"

But is giving output in hexadecimal format in redis console only. Is it possible to store the data for a specific key in a file and later import it to that key?

  • It could be a bit off-topic since you asked for a backup and restore (and maybe save that backup file somewhere), but it could be a nice hint too: the redis MIGRATE command takes care of dumping-restoring among 2 machines, while it's a currently limited command. With redis < 3, the key will be deleted from source instance (this could be a minor problem, since you can easily backup your source DB before migrating and then using it again after), and I wasn't able to find some option for supporting authentication on destination DB. – reallynice Nov 28 '14 at 8:06
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In case you are trying to dump/restore a key from the command line (which is what I needed to do when I found this question), Redis has some non-obvious quirks. Please see this answer for a more detailed explanation.

The short answer is to dump/restore as follows:

bwood@mybox:~$ redis-cli --raw dump mykey | head -c-1 > myfile
bwood@mybox:~$ cat myfile | redis-cli -x restore mynewkey 0
  • works like a charm, thank you! – Timothy Dalton Jul 1 '18 at 9:01
  • If someone is interested in a batch script to grab all keys and save them to files #!/bin/bash for each in $( redis-cli KEYS \apikey* ); do redis-cli --raw dump mykey | head -c-1 > dump/$each done these can be used to import afterwards with the above script from Brendan Wood – Timothy Dalton Jul 1 '18 at 9:02
3

Following up on this post:

bwood@mybox:~$ redis-cli --raw dump mykey | head -c-1 > myfile
bwood@mybox:~$ cat myfile | redis-cli -x restore mynewkey 0

If this doesn't work for you and you get an error like: head: illegal byte count -- -1

Then modify the dump command without the head command:

redis-cli --raw dump mykey > myfile

Now, open the dump file with sublime on the mac or textpad on the pc and remove the last two chars and save and then do the restore.

These were my two last lines:

 0561 7074 7572 6520 fa00 5be0 0526 015d
 7d06 00a7 afed c100 323d 400a 

I removed "0a" and saved and the restore worked, e.g.

0561 7074 7572 6520 fa00 5be0 0526 015d
7d06 00a7 afed c100 323d 40
  • This is exactly what worked for me! – Avik Aggarwal May 29 at 15:56
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Write a script that will DUMP needed keys, save the output to files and then later you can read those files and shove their content to RESTORE command.

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