7

EDIT: The question essentially asks to generate prime numbers up to a certain limit. The original question follows.

I want my if statement to become true if only these two conditions are met:

for i := 2; i <= 10; i++ {

    if i%i == 0 && i%1 == 0 {

    } else {

    }
}

In this case every possible number gets past these conditions, however I want only the numbers 2, 3, 5, 7, 11... basically numbers that are divisible only with themselves and by 1 to get past, with the exception being the very first '2'. How can I do this?

Thanks

  • 6
    Are you sure that's how a prime check works? – Potatoswatter Feb 18 '14 at 12:42
  • 2
    Your if statement could be translated to "if true". – user932887 Feb 18 '14 at 12:51
  • probably not, Is if an statement like I requested possible though? where it follows the conditions strickly? – albind Feb 18 '14 at 12:53
  • 1
    @albind Your if statment checks that i is evenly divisible by itself and by 1. All numbers are. So your if statment is not excluding any numbers. – Emil H Feb 18 '14 at 12:55
  • is it possible to exclude all numbers except i and 1 (in this example) – albind Feb 18 '14 at 13:02
12

It seems you are looking for prime numbers. However the conditions you described are not sufficient. In fact you have to use an algorithm to generate them (up to a certain limit most probably).

This is an implementation of the Sieve of Atkin which is an optimized variation of the ancient Sieve of Eratosthenes.

Demo: http://play.golang.org/p/XXiTIpRBAu

For the sake of completeness:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math"
)

// Only primes less than or equal to N will be generated
const N = 100

func main() {
    var x, y, n int
    nsqrt := math.Sqrt(N)

    is_prime := [N]bool{}

    for x = 1; float64(x) <= nsqrt; x++ {
        for y = 1; float64(y) <= nsqrt; y++ {
            n = 4*(x*x) + y*y
            if n <= N && (n%12 == 1 || n%12 == 5) {
                is_prime[n] = !is_prime[n]
            }
            n = 3*(x*x) + y*y
            if n <= N && n%12 == 7 {
                is_prime[n] = !is_prime[n]
            }
            n = 3*(x*x) - y*y
            if x > y && n <= N && n%12 == 11 {
                is_prime[n] = !is_prime[n]
            }
        }
    }

    for n = 5; float64(n) <= nsqrt; n++ {
        if is_prime[n] {
            for y = n * n; y < N; y += n * n {
                is_prime[y] = false
            }
        }
    }

    is_prime[2] = true
    is_prime[3] = true

    primes := make([]int, 0, 1270606)
    for x = 0; x < len(is_prime)-1; x++ {
        if is_prime[x] {
            primes = append(primes, x)
        }
    }

    // primes is now a slice that contains all primes numbers up to N
    // so let's print them
    for _, x := range primes {
        fmt.Println(x)
    }
}
  • This is amazing, thanks and sorry for my uncunningness – albind Feb 18 '14 at 13:17
  • @Agis, I don't think the code is working as expected. I'm getting all integers from 0 to 24. – siritinga Feb 18 '14 at 13:18
  • 1
    @siritinga had a typo. Fixed now. – Agis Feb 18 '14 at 13:20
  • I just added primes to the last fmt.Println(x, primes) Edit: tried yours again works great now – albind Feb 18 '14 at 13:22
  • 1
    what 1270606 stands for? – Павел Тявин Sep 28 '15 at 17:22
8

Here's a golang sieve of Eratosthenes

package main
import "fmt"

// return list of primes less than N
func sieveOfEratosthenes(N int) (primes []int) {
    b := make([]bool, N)
    for i := 2; i < N; i++ {
        if b[i] == true { continue }
        primes = append(primes, i)
        for k := i * i; k < N; k += i {
            b[k] = true
        }
    }
    return
}

func main() {
    primes := sieveOfEratosthenes(100)
    for _, p := range primes {
        fmt.Println(p)
    }
}
  • May I know why k := i*i instead of k := i? – Nam G VU Sep 26 '17 at 11:41
  • I see - all numbers in the form of i*x with x in [2, i-1] are already marked previously in the outer loop where i=x – Nam G VU Sep 26 '17 at 11:43
5

The simplest method to get "numbers that are divisible only with themselves and by 1", which are also known as prime numbers is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes

It's not a "simple if statement".

  • To be fair, that's the simplest reasonably efficient method, but an O(N^2) nested for loop is simpler. – Potatoswatter Feb 18 '14 at 12:48
  • 1
    @Potatoswatter Fair enough. But I consider that equivalent to teaching bubble sort. Because of its simplicity it's easy to remember and leads to people only remembering that and then you find it in production years later while trying to figure out why something simple takes an eternity to execute. – Art Feb 18 '14 at 12:52
  • I'd be equally upset if a coworker implemented QuickSort, since the library implementations are just fine. Time spent on that or Bubble sort is equally wasted. – Potatoswatter Feb 18 '14 at 12:58
1

If you don't mind a very small chance (9.1e-13 in this case) of them not being primes you can use ProbablyPrime from math/big like this (play)

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/big"
)

func main() {
    for i := 2; i < 1000; i++ {
        if big.NewInt(int64(i)).ProbablyPrime(20) {
            fmt.Printf("%d is probably prime\n", i)
        } else {
            fmt.Printf("%d is definitely not prime\n", i)
        }
    }
}

Just change the constant 20 to be as sure as you like that they are primes.

  • He wants to generate primes, not to check for primality. – Salvador Dali May 25 '15 at 5:29
1

Simple way(fixed):

package main

import "math"

const n = 100

func main() {
    print(1, " ", 2)

L:  for i := 3; i <= n; i += 2 {
        m := int(math.Floor(math.Sqrt(float64(i))))
        for j := 2; j <= m; j++ {
            if i%j == 0 {
                continue L
            }
        }
        print(" ", i)
    }
}
1

just change the 100 in the outer for loop to the limit of the prime number you want to find. cheers!!

    for i:=2; i<=100; i++{


        isPrime:=true

        for j:=2; j<i; j++{

            if i % j == 0 {

                isPrime = false
            }
        }

        if isPrime == true {

            fmt.Println(i)
        } 
    }


}
0

Here try this by checking all corner cases and optimised way to find you numbers and run the logic when the function returns true.

package main

import (
    "math"
    "time"
    "fmt"
)

func prime(n int) bool {

    if n < 1 {
        return false
    }

    if n == 2 {
        return true
    }

    if n % 2 == 0 && n > 2 {
        return false
    }

    var maxDivisor = int(math.Floor(math.Sqrt(float64 (n))))

    //d := 3
    for d:=3 ;d <= 1 + maxDivisor; d += 2 {

        if n%d == 0 {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}
//======Test Function=====

func main() {
    // var t0 = time.Time{}
    var t0= time.Second
    for i := 1; i <= 1000; i++ {
        fmt.Println(prime(i))
    }
    var t1= time.Second
    println(t1 - t0)
}
0
package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    //runtime.GOMAXPROCS(4)

    ch := make(chan int)
    go generate(ch)
    for {
        prime := <-ch
        fmt.Println(prime)
        ch1 := make(chan int)
        go filter(ch, ch1, prime)
        ch = ch1
    }
}

func generate(ch chan int) {
    for i := 2; ; i++ {
        ch <- i
    }
}

func filter(in, out chan int, prime int) {
    for {
        i := <-in
        if i%prime != 0 {
            out <- i
        }
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.