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I use IDA Pro to disassemble SPEC 2006 binaries on Windows 7 32 bit.

It generates a variable declared like this:

rterrs rterrmsgs <2,   aR6002FloatingP>
rterrmsgs <8,   aR6008NotEnough>
terrmsgs <9,   aR6009NotEnough>
rterrmsgs <0Ah,   aR6010AbortHasB>
rterrmsgs <10h,   aR6016NotEnough>
rterrmsgs <11h,   aR6017Unexpecte>
rterrmsgs <12h,   aR6018Unexpecte>

and I can find the definition of aR6002FloatingP, aR6008NotEnough, aR6010AbortHasB... like

aR6016NotEnough: 

  dw        __utf16__('R6016')
  dw 0Dh, 0Ah
  dw        __utf16__('- not enough space for thread data')
  dw 0Dh, 0Ah, 0

So basically instructions like

rterrmsgs <11h,   aR6017Unexpecte>

can not be directly assembled into binary using nasm/masm, I am thinking this stuff should work like a array, but basically what is 2, 8, 9 in

rterrs rterrmsgs <2,   aR6002FloatingP>
rterrmsgs <8,   aR6008NotEnough>
terrmsgs <9,   aR6009NotEnough>

so my question is, how to adjust instructions above to make it re-assembled in nasm syntax?

THank you!

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These are simply instances of a structure from the CRT :

/* struct used to lookup and access runtime error messages */

struct rterrmsgs {
    int rterrno;        /* error number */
    char *rterrtxt;     /* text of error message */
};

see (for example) : ftp://ftp.cs.ntust.edu.tw/yang/PC-SIMSCRIPT/C++/VC98/CRT/SRC/CRT0MSG.C

In your example, if you take :

rterrmsgs <10h,   aR6016NotEnough>

It corresponds to the following entry :

    /* 16 */
    { _RT_THREAD, _RT_THREAD_TXT },

where _RT_THREAD is 16 (0x10) and _RT_THREAD_TXT is defined as follows:

#define _RT_THREAD_TXT     "R6016" EOL "- not enough space for thread data" EOL

see (http://bioen.okstate.edu/Home/prashm%20-%20keep/prashant/VS.NET%20setup%20files/PROGRAM%20FILES/MICROSOFT%20VISUAL%20STUDIO%20.NET/VC7/CRT/SRC/CMSGS.H) for various messages.

Hope that helps :)

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