-4
a = [1, 2]
print a * 2 

produces [1, 2, 1, 2]. Now

b = [[1, 2], [3, 4]]

Can I convert b into [[1, 2, 1, 2], [3, 4, 3, 4]] without looping?

closed as off-topic by jonrsharpe, tom10, dawg, mhlester, Krease Feb 19 '14 at 0:20

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – jonrsharpe, tom10, dawg, Krease
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    Why without looping? With looping it's as simple as this: b = [x * 2 for x in a]. – Linuxios Feb 18 '14 at 22:11
  • 1
    @Bill, until there's an explanation for why looping isn't allowed, it's a terribly useless handicap – mhlester Feb 18 '14 at 22:29
  • 1
    @mhlester, SchighSchagh. I think it's clear OP means no explicit looping; OP found cool behavior with [1, 2]*2 and wants to know its limits. What if the question was amended to say "Out of curiosity, can I ... without explicitly looping?"? – wflynny Feb 18 '14 at 22:39
  • 2
    If OP had said that, it'd be fine. But as written currently, it says "I don't know how to loop, and I'm scared. I'm not ready to learn it yet so don't teach me the right way to do this." – mhlester Feb 18 '14 at 22:41
  • 2
    @Bill I completely agree with mhlester. EDIT: Also, it's not clear to me that OP simply means no explicit looping, because I've seen questions here wherein posters seem to think that by hiding the loop, the code will magically run in O(1) or something. – Nicu Stiurca Feb 18 '14 at 22:46
8

If you don't mind a list of tuples, you could try some zip shenanigans:

zip(*zip(*b)*2)

which returns

[(1, 2, 1, 2), (3, 4, 3, 4)]
  • 2
    that is quite a splat of splats. +1 – mhlester Feb 18 '14 at 22:23
4

Does a list comprehension count as looping?

>>> [x*2 for x in b]
[[1, 2, 1, 2], [3, 4, 3, 4]]
  • 1
    It probably does, but there's no reason I can think of not to use one. – Linuxios Feb 18 '14 at 22:11
3

If you can't use loops, feel free to use recursion:

def expand(mylist,n):
    if len(mylist)==1:
        return [mylist[0]*n]
    else:
        return [mylist[0]*n] + expand(mylist[1:],n)

Input:

a = [[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]]

Call:

expand(a,2)

Output:

[[1, 2, 1, 2], [3, 4, 3, 4], [5, 6, 5, 6]]
0

As the others said, iteration will happen no matter what if you want to solve the problem for arbitrary numbers of lists. If your list only has 2 members, the following solution works without iteration:

b = [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
# Uses iterable unpacking, which may be considered iteration
l1, l2 = b
# If you don't want iterable unpacking, use that instead:
# l1 = b[0]; l2 = b[1]
print [l1 * 2, l2 * 2]

For an arbitrary number of lists and "hidden" iteration (you're iterating with the map function rather than with an explicit for loop), try this:

b = [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
print map(lambda x: x * 2, b)
  • map(lambda ...ouch – mhlester Feb 18 '14 at 22:19
  • 2
    @mhlester Well, it is terrible taste but OP asked for no iteration. Of course I, too, would use a list comprehension or a for loop in the real world ;) – Max Noel Feb 18 '14 at 22:20
0

You could use map:

>>> b = [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
>>> list(map(lambda l: l*2, b))
[[1, 2, 1, 2], [3, 4, 3, 4]]
  • This is the same as list comprehension, just much less readable. – Nicu Stiurca Feb 18 '14 at 22:32
  • 2
    That is kinda harsh. OP said 'no loops' and readability is in the eye of the beholder. – dawg Feb 18 '14 at 22:36
  • 5
    Well, now I'm too scared to post list(map(list,map(chain.from_iterable,map(partial(repeat,times=2),b)))) even though it's entertaining, if people are going to downvote answers which arguably satisfy the (frankly silly) requirements. [+1.] – DSM Feb 18 '14 at 22:52
  • @DSM, I'd totally upvote that, if only for the hilarity of the situation – mhlester Feb 18 '14 at 22:54

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