I know that for a long time MT has not made it easy / accessible to edit the default markup that wraps an [image] asset when it is inserted into a MT entry. (So strange that this hasn't been created as a system module like everything else.)

There is one plugin that seemed to solve this problem, though it was written for MT 4* and seems to be defunct: https://github.com/endevver/mt-plugin-custom-asset-markup I've installed it, anyway, and it's unclear how it's supposed to work or be triggered / managed (there are no settings, though I may be doing it wrong).

Every time an image is inserted into an entry, I want its markup to include a few of its properties in the tag. For example, I want to assign the ID value of each image when it's inserted into the entry body:

<IMG ID="ar_<mt:AssetId>" … />
  • Has this problem been solved in MT 6? (I'm holding off a system upgrade till we launch as I don't want to destabilize right now, but might be worth it.)
  • Tips on how to operate the plugin above?
  • Any suggestions / hacks, other than editing the Perl modules directly or writing my own plugin?
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've used the Assetylene plugin to do this many times. It works just as you expect -- create a template module named "Asset Insertion" and edit the HTML to be spit out. I've tested it with MT4 and 5 -- I'm sure it works with 5.2.6 -- and it should work with MT6, too.

  • Sweet, thanks! I found an earlier / defunct version of that plugin that had been abandoned for a few years and I couldn't get it working. Wasn't able to find the updated version. – ElBel Feb 20 '14 at 5:24
  • Yes, by far the biggest problem with using Github for things is that it's easy to "lose" the most up-to-date repo. – Dan Wolfgang Feb 20 '14 at 12:23

I ended up just editing the Perl files. FTR the relevant portions are here:

lib/MT/Asset/Image.pm

New code is below. Essentially there are a few conditions that output blobs of HTML, per the options selected by the user when inserting an asset into an entry. I know nothing about Perl — but basically in each relevant case inserted the MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->id ) into the sprintf call, and used the %s thingy to insert the value of the ID into my HTML at the appropriate point.

(I also got rid of the ca 1999 onclick "open a popup" code — replaced it with properties that can be read with a to-be-written jquery call.)

        my $link
            = $thumb
            ? sprintf(
            '<img src="%s" %s alt="%s" %s id="aid_%s" />',
            MT::Util::encode_html( $thumb->url ),   $dimensions,
            MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->label ), $wrap_style,
            MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->id )
            )
            : MT->translate('View image');
        $text = sprintf(
            q|<a href="%s" class="popup" data-img-url="%s" data-img-width="%s" data-img-width="%s">%s</a>|,
            MT::Util::encode_html( $popup->url ),
            MT::Util::encode_html( $popup->url ),
            $asset->image_width,
            $asset->image_height,
            $link,
        );
    }
    else {
        if ( $param->{thumb} ) {
            $text = sprintf(
                '<a href="%s"><img alt="%s" src="%s" %s %s id="aid_%s" /></a>',
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->url ),
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->label ),
                MT::Util::encode_html( $thumb->url ),
                $dimensions,
            : MT->translate('View image');
        $text = sprintf(
            q|<a href="%s" class="popup" data-img-url="%s" data-img-width="%s" data-img-width="%s">%s</a>|,
            MT::Util::encode_html( $popup->url ),
            MT::Util::encode_html( $popup->url ),
            $asset->image_width,
            $asset->image_height,
            $link,
        );
    }
    else {
        if ( $param->{thumb} ) {
            $text = sprintf(
                '<a href="%s"><img alt="%s" src="%s" %s %s id="aid_%s" /></a>',
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->url ),
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->label ),
                MT::Util::encode_html( $thumb->url ),
                $dimensions,
                $wrap_style,
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->id )
            );
        }
        else {
            $text = sprintf(
                '<img alt="%s" src="%s" %s %s id="aid_%s" />',
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->label ),
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->url ),
                $dimensions, $wrap_style,
                MT::Util::encode_html( $asset->id ),
            );
        }
    }
  • 1
    I always recommend against editing the core. Anytime you upgrade you'll have to figure out how to re-apply your changes again. – Dan Wolfgang Feb 20 '14 at 2:21
  • No kidding. :) Although I'm pretty sure that code hasn't been touched since 2001 based on the looks of it. – ElBel Feb 20 '14 at 5:25
  • 1
    Dan is right, that the code of a core file hasn't changed between releases is irrelevant, that file will be overwritten at the next update. Don't ever touch the core code unless you really know what you're doing and keep track of your own modifications. – François Nonnenmacher Feb 20 '14 at 7:55

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.