8

I have a backbone view that looks like this:

var myView = Backbone.view.extend({
    events: {'click .myClass': 'myFunction'},
    initialze: //initialize function,
    render: //render function,
    myFunction: function (e) {
        //do something
    }
});

I want to make myFunction work only one time, then stop being called. I believe I could use the backbone once() method to achieve this but can't figure it out. Is this the best way and how do I structure it? Thanks!

13

Simply replace your current definition:

myFunction: function(){....}

by

myFunction: _.once(function(){....})

myFunction may be called several times, but it will be a noop after the first call.

  • This worked perfectly and seemed the simplest solution, thanks! – YPCrumble Feb 19 '14 at 5:40
  • What happens here if you have two instances of the view? Either at the same time or at different times while your application is running. – mu is too short Dec 1 '16 at 17:49
  • @muistooshort here it would be called only once per instance . If you wanted to call it only once overall, you'd use a function defined at the same level than myView for instance. – Greg Dec 5 '16 at 12:43
  • 1
    Are you sure about that? jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/u6oshjwn – mu is too short Dec 5 '16 at 18:26
  • 1
    But in the case of an event handler, the handlers will be bound before initialize gets called (jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/zqhaj97w) so f won't be there or it won't be the right f, you'd need to throw a manual delegateEvents call into the mix (jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/jdhejxgz) to get everything hooked up properly. Sorry to belabour this point but there are some subtle traps. – mu is too short Dec 6 '16 at 18:44
5

View events are bound using delegateEvents and that uses the delegation form of jQuery's on. That means that the event to handler mapping is dynamic and can be manipulated by manipulating the DOM. For example, you could do this:

Backbone.View.extend({
    events: {
        'click .myClass.onlyOnce': 'doThings'
    },
    doThings: function(e) {
        $(e.currentTarget).removeClass('onlyOnce');
        //...
    },
    //...
});

and make sure that the .myClass element also has an onlyOnce class. Then, the first time you click on it, it will match .myClass.onlyOnce and the click will get routed to doThings; doThings then proceeds to remove the onlyOnce class and do whatever needs to be done. Subsequent clicks on .myClass will be clicks on something that does not match .myClass.onlyOnce so doThings won't be called again.

This approach has the nice advantage of self documenting its behavior in events.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/7KJgT/

1

You could add an attribute to the element the first time, and then check if the element has the attribute:

var myView = Backbone.view.extend({
    events: {'click .myClass': 'myFunction'},
    initialze: //initialize function,
    render: //render function,
    myFunction: function (e) {
        if(e.target.getAttribute("data-fired")) return;
        e.target.setAttribute("data-fired", true);
        // Do your stuff
    }
});
  • Aristizabal: data attribute has a partial support for IE, so we can use class in order to validate condition. – Mohit Pandey Feb 19 '14 at 4:57
  • @Mohit: Can you be more specific about this "partial support" in IE? – mu is too short Feb 19 '14 at 4:58
  • @muistooshort: caniuse.com/dataset is the reason of what i am saying. You may correct me, if i am wrong. – Mohit Pandey Feb 19 '14 at 5:21
  • 1
    @Mohit: That link does say that "All browsers can already use data-* attributes and access them using getAttribute" so this use is fine. caniuse also neglects to specify what specifically "partial support" means. – mu is too short Feb 19 '14 at 5:35
0

You could add a class to the element to validate your condition.

var myView = Backbone.view.extend({
    events: {
        'click .myClass': 'myFunction'
    },
    initialze: //initialize function,
    render: //render function,
    myFunction: function (e) {
        if (e.target.className.search(/triggered/) !== -1) return; // event already triggered once
        e.target.className += "triggered";
        //do something when its triggered first time
    }
});

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