6

How do I programmatically figure out if an object in a Key value pair is enumerable?

I need to know if a object in the value field is a List or Array. I should be able to determine what kind of enumerable type the object is(eg a List of strings or an array of ints)

List<KeyValuePair<string, object>> lKVP = new List<KeyValuePair<string, object>>();
List<string> lS = new List<string> { "s1", "s2" };

lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("PassPhrase", "E92D8719-38A6-0000-961F-0E66FCB0A363"));
lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("Test", lS));

What I have tried:

1)

foreach(KeyValuePair<string,object> kvp in _ParameterReplacement)
{
    if(kvp.Value is Enumerable)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Yes");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("No");
    }
 }

2)

foreach(KeyValuePair<string,object> kvp in _ParameterReplacement)
{
    if(kvp.Value.GetType() == typeof(IEnumerable<object>))
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Yes");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("No");
    }
 }
3

Using dynamic

You could leverage the dynamic keyword to do this, but I think it might be too slow for you.

However, this is how you could do it. This will call a strongly-typed enumerate() method for List<T> and T[], or if the value is neither a List nor an array, it will call the overload of enumerate() which just takes an object.

I'm not entire sure this is what you are after, but it does give you a strongly-typed enumeration for the lists and arrays in your KVP list.

Note that as per your specification, this ONLY considers List and Array types; other enumerable types (such as strings, HashSet and so on) are not considered:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApp1
{
    sealed class Program
    {
        void test()
        {
            List<KeyValuePair<string, object>> lKVP = new List<KeyValuePair<string, object>>();
            List<string> lS = new List<string> { "s1", "s2" };
            string[] aS = {"a1", "a2"};

            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("String", "E92D8719-38A6-0000-961F-0E66FCB0A363"));
            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("Test", lS));
            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("IntNotEnumerable", 12345));
            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("Array", aS));

            foreach (KeyValuePair<string,object> kvp in lKVP)
            {
                enumerate((dynamic) kvp.Value);
            }
        }

        static void enumerate<T>(List<T> list)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enumerating list of " + typeof(T).FullName);

            foreach (var item in list)
                Console.WriteLine(item);

            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        static void enumerate<T>(T[] array)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enumerating array of " + typeof(T).FullName);

            foreach (var item in array)
                Console.WriteLine(item);

            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        static void enumerate(object obj)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Not enumerating type " + obj.GetType().FullName + " with value " + obj);
            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            new Program().test();
        }
    }
}

Using explicit reflection

Here's a way of doing it using reflection that avoids using dynamic, which means it's a lot faster - but as you can see it's significantly more fiddly!

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Reflection;

namespace ConsoleApp1
{
    sealed class Program
    {
        void test()
        {
            List<KeyValuePair<string, object>> lKVP = new List<KeyValuePair<string, object>>();
            List<string> lS = new List<string> { "s1", "s2" };
            string[] aS = {"a1", "a2"};

            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("String", "E92D8719-38A6-0000-961F-0E66FCB0A363"));
            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("Test", lS));
            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("IntNotEnumerable", 12345));
            lKVP.Add(new KeyValuePair<string, object>("Array", aS));

            var listEnumerator  = this.GetType().GetMethod("enumerateList",  BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static);
            var arrayEnumerator = this.GetType().GetMethod("enumerateArray", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Static);

            foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object> kvp in lKVP)
            {
                MethodInfo genericEnumerator = null;
                var arrayElemType = arrayElementType(kvp.Value);

                if (arrayElemType != null)
                {
                    genericEnumerator = arrayEnumerator.MakeGenericMethod(arrayElemType);
                }
                else
                {
                    var listElemType = listElementType(kvp.Value);

                    if (listElemType != null)
                        genericEnumerator = listEnumerator.MakeGenericMethod(listElemType);
                }

                if (genericEnumerator != null)
                    genericEnumerator.Invoke(null, new[] { kvp.Value });
                else
                    Console.WriteLine("Not enumerating type: " + kvp.Value.GetType().FullName + "\n");
            }
        }

        static Type arrayElementType(object sequence)
        {
            if (sequence is IEnumerable)
            {
                var type = sequence.GetType();

                if (type.IsArray)
                    return type.GetElementType();
            }

            return null;
        }

        static Type listElementType(object sequence)
        {
            if (sequence is IEnumerable)
            {
                var type = sequence.GetType();

                if (typeof(IList).IsAssignableFrom(type) && type.IsGenericType)
                    return type.GetProperty("Item").PropertyType;
            }

            return null;
        }

        static void enumerateList<T>(List<T> list)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enumerating list of " + typeof(T).FullName);

            foreach (var item in list)
                Console.WriteLine(item);

            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        static void enumerateArray<T>(T[] array)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enumerating array of " + typeof(T).FullName);

            foreach (var item in array)
                Console.WriteLine(item);

            Console.WriteLine();
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            new Program().test();
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • When using your reflection code I get an object reference not sent to an instance of an object on line genericEnumerator =listEnumerator.MakeGenericMethod(listElemType); – BossRoss Feb 20 '14 at 5:44
  • @BossRoss You will not get that error when you run my sample code without any changes. If you get that error when you've changed the code, it's because there is no static private method called "enumerateList" in the class, and therefore GetMethod() returns null. You will need to change that call to specify the appropriate method name and binding flags for the method you want to call. – Matthew Watson Feb 20 '14 at 9:00
  • I have used the reflection code, it works well (when the right methods are static) Thank you for the help and good answer – BossRoss Feb 21 '14 at 8:11
1

You have to review the implemented interfaces of kvp.Value. This is only possible through reflection.

var type = kvp.Value.GetType();
if (type.IsArray) return type.GetElementType();
foreach (var i in type.GetInterfaces())
{
    if (i.IsGenericType && i.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IEnumerable<>))
    {
        return i.GetGenericTypeArguments()[0];
    }
}
// not a generic collection
return typeof(object);

This way, you can determine the element type of the collection at runtime. However, to retrieve the items, it is best to use the non-generic IEnumerable interface, because you don't need the (expensive) reflection overhead. Checking for IEnumerableis also a good starting point, so it doesn't make too much sense to check the element type if kvp.Valueis not a collection at all.

| improve this answer | |
  • GetGenericTypeArguments is not accessible, you should use GetGenericArguments. BTW, yours works fine. – Teejay Feb 19 '14 at 14:02
1

This works for most Enumerable types:

Type objListType = null;

if (kvp.Value is IEnumerable) {

    if (kvp.Value.GetType().IsArray) 
        objListType = kvp.Value.GetType().GetElementType();
    else
        objListType = kvp.Value.GetType().GetProperty("Item").PropertyType;

}
| improve this answer | |
  • @Georg yeah, I wrote most – Teejay Feb 19 '14 at 12:12
  • @ANeves i use it for lists – Teejay Feb 19 '14 at 12:13
  • @ANeves You have to include a using statement to System.Collections – Georg Feb 19 '14 at 12:13
  • True; I had it only for System.Collections.Generic. – ANeves thinks SE is evil Feb 19 '14 at 12:14
  • @Teejay Yes, but in my opinion sets are a very important class of collections (although Microsoft apparently has a different opinion). Your approach is only valid for lists – Georg Feb 19 '14 at 12:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.