136

In Python console:

~True

Gives me:

-2

Why? Can someone explain this particular case to me in binary?

5
  • 23
    because ~1 is -2, Try: True == 1 Feb 19 '14 at 13:06
  • 15
    Just to be precise: it is not true that "True is 1", but is is true that True == 1.
    – Bach
    Feb 19 '14 at 13:11
  • 3
    Do you really think seeing UNARY_INVERT (the whole of the bytecode) will add anything to answers?
    – Wooble
    Feb 19 '14 at 13:16
  • 2
    This question is not a duplicate! It asks about a specific behaviour of bool. It's not about how ~ works. In fact a valid answer to this question could avoid mentioning 2's complement and how ~ operates on integers at all.
    – Bakuriu
    Feb 19 '14 at 21:59
245

int(True) is 1.

1 is:

00000001

and ~1 is:

11111110

Which is -2 in Two's complement1

1 Flip all the bits, add 1 to the resulting number and interpret the result as a binary representation of the magnitude and add a negative sign (since the number begins with 1):

11111110 → 00000001 → 00000010 
         ↑          ↑ 
       Flip       Add 1

Which is 2, but the sign is negative since the MSB is 1.


Worth mentioning:

Think about bool, you'll find that it's numeric in nature - It has two values, True and False, and they are just "customized" versions of the integers 1 and 0 that only print themselves differently. They are subclasses of the integer type int.

So they behave exactly as 1 and 0, except that bool redefines str and repr to display them differently.

>>> type(True)
<class 'bool'>
>>> isinstance(True, int)
True

>>> True == 1
True
>>> True is 1  # they're still different objects
False
6
  • 1
    @ofcapl Just wanted to say: Although int('1') is also 1 but ~'1' be a typeerror exception whereas ~True is not this is because bool is a subclass of int @ Martijn added this information in his answer. Feb 19 '14 at 13:35
  • For the record, @ofcapl, this answer shows the binary arithmetic interpretation of what's going on, not the actual bytecode (which would be some sort of intermediate or operation level code compiled from the source).
    – Patrick M
    Feb 19 '14 at 15:53
  • 5
    @etrusco what languages are you talking about? I know exactly 0 where True == -1, and I know many where one could say that True == 1...
    – l4mpi
    Feb 20 '14 at 9:19
  • 1
    @etrusco @l4mpi Some old-school BASICs use -1 for TRUE; it has the nice property that the bitwise AND and OR operators work for logical AND and OR as well (x & -1 is non-zero in the same cases that x && 1 is non-zero in C), as long as you don't care about short-circuiting. However, as far as I know, no mainstream language has ever used -1 for TRUE. Feb 20 '14 at 19:56
  • 1
    Formal logic defines truth as univalued; with all that is not true being false. All programming languages that I'm aware of turn formal logic on its head, defining false as univalued (0) and all that is not false being true). For instance C#, though Javascript is something of an outlier, having multiple flavors of truthiness and multiple flavors of falsiness. Feb 20 '14 at 20:27
45

The Python bool type is a subclass of int (for historical reasons; booleans were only added in Python 2.3).

Since int(True) is 1, ~True is ~1 is -2.

See PEP 285 for why bool is a subclass of int.

If you wanted the boolean inverse, use not:

>>> not True
False
>>> not False
True

If you wanted to know why ~1 is -2, it's because you are inverting all bits in a signed integer; 00000001 becomes 1111110 which in a signed integer is a negative number, see Two's complement:

>>> # Python 3
...
>>> import struct
>>> format(struct.pack('b', 1)[0], '08b')
'00000001'
>>> format(struct.pack('b', ~1)[0], '08b')
'11111110'

where the initial 1 bit means the value is negative, and the rest of the bits encode the inverse of the positive number minus one.

9
  • 1
    @GrijeshChauhan: For two's compliment, you could use struct.pack, as bin(integer) or format(integer, '08b') don't take signed integers into account.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Feb 19 '14 at 13:16
  • @thefourtheye , MartijnPieters I Tried But it is confusing e.g. bin(~True), bin(-2), bin(~1) all gives '-0b10' If -2 representation is 10 then why - sign. Feb 19 '14 at 13:19
  • What I mean 10 itself 2'complement then -ve? Feb 19 '14 at 13:21
  • 1
    @GrijeshChauhan You can get the two's complement notation of both negative and positive numbers like this format(-2 % (1 << 32), "032b") Feb 19 '14 at 13:26
  • 2
    @thefourtheye: I'd use a bitmask: format(-2 & ((1 << 32) - 1), "032b")
    – Martijn Pieters
    Feb 19 '14 at 13:28
4

~True == -2 is not surprising if True means 1 and ~ means bitwise inversion...

...provided that

  • True can be treated as an integer and
  • integers are represented in Two's complement

Edits:

  • fixed the mixing between integer representation and bitwise inversion operator
  • applied another polishing (the shorter the message, the more work needed)
2
  • 2
    ~ does not mean "2s complement". ~ means "Bitwise Inversion"
    – McKay
    Feb 20 '14 at 14:18
  • 1
    The phrase "Ones' complement" doesn't really refer to an operation, as much as it refers to a system of storing integers in bits. A system that isn't actually used in a computer system.
    – McKay
    Feb 20 '14 at 14:27

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