I'm trying to run my very first c++ program in linux (linux mint 8). I use either gcc or g++, both with the same problem: the compiler does not find the library I am trying to import.

I suspect something like I should either copy the iostream.h file (which I don't know where to look for) in the working folder, move my file to compile somewhere else or use an option of some sort.

Thanks for your suggestions.

Here's the gcc command, the c++ code, and the error message:

gcc -o addition listing2.5.c

.

#include <iostream.h>

int Addition(int a, int b)
{
    return (a + b);
}

int main()
{
    cout << "Resultat : " << Addition(2, 4) << "\n";
    return 0;
}

.

listing2.5.c:1:22: error: iostream.h: No such file or directory
listing2.5.c: In function ‘main’:
listing2.5.c:10: error: ‘cout’ undeclared (first use in this function)
listing2.5.c:10: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
listing2.5.c:10: error: for each function it appears in.)

Now the code compiles, but I cannot run it from the command line using the file name. addition: command not found Any suggestion?

  • Surprise! They went and changed the language in incompatible ways. That was nice of them. – Eric Seppanen Feb 3 '10 at 0:19
  • @Eric: Who is "they", and what did they "change" ? – MSalters Feb 3 '10 at 9:53
  • I don't code in C++ often enough to know or care who's in charge of C++ standards. But I once had the same experience as Morlock, of coming back to C++ after many years and discovering that #includes no longer use .h and cin/cout went and hid inside std::. – Eric Seppanen Feb 3 '10 at 17:21
up vote 23 down vote accepted
  • cout is defined in the std:: namespace, you need to use std::cout instead of just cout.
  • You should also use #include <iostream> not the old iostream.h
  • use g++ to compile C++ programs, it'll link in the standard c++ library. gcc will not. gcc will also compile your code as C code if you give it a .c suffix. Give your files a .cpp suffix.
  • Thx for your reply. I guess I'll trow away the 2000 book I'm learning with. :) – Morlock Feb 3 '10 at 0:37
  • Hum, the "addition" file created does not work. I try to use it from the command line, writing: addition, but it says "command not found". I also tried to click on it and no terminal pops up. How could I make it work? – Morlock Feb 3 '10 at 0:44
  • 1
    The current directory isn't in your path. Try ./addition – caf Feb 3 '10 at 1:51
  • Thx caf, solved my problem :) – Morlock Feb 3 '10 at 2:36

You need <iostream> not <iostream.h>.

They are also header files not libraries.

Other things to fix, cout should be std::cout and you should use std::endl instead of "\n".

  • 4
    No, using "\n" is better. I think you are aware that std::endl flushes the stream also. – AraK Feb 3 '10 at 0:13
  • Thx for clearing the confusion with std::endl AraK – Morlock Feb 3 '10 at 0:38

You need <iostream>, <iostream.h> is non-standard too-old header. Try this:

#include <iostream>

int Addition(int a, int b)
{
    return (a + b);
}

int main()
{
    using namespace std;
    cout << "Resultat : " << Addition(2, 4) << "\n";
    return 0;
}

please use g++ not gcc to compile it

  • 3
    You really need to provide more information than this. (Why g++ should be used for example.) – John Parker May 13 '13 at 16:23
  • g++ and gcc is the same compiler but with different frontend. One of this difference is that g++ with link with C++ standard libraries (like <iostream> your are using) and not the gcc frontend. – Steve S. Jul 10 '17 at 1:47

If you don't want to use std alongside cout as-

std::cout << "Hello World";

You can also define std at beginning of program by 'using namespace' keywords as-

     #include <iostream >

     using namespace std;

    int Addition(int a, int b)
    {
        return (a + b);
    }

    int main()
    {
        cout << "Result : " << Addition(2, 4) << "\n";
        return 0;
    }

Now you need not to write std,everytime you use I/O operations.

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