166

I would like to change the color of a particular row in my datagridview. The row should be changed to red when the value of columncell 7 is less than the value in columncell 10. Any suggestions on how to accomplish this?

0

20 Answers 20

228

You need to loop through the rows in the datagridview and then compare values of columns 7 and 10 on each row.

Try this:

foreach (DataGridViewRow row in vendorsDataGridView.Rows) 
     if (Convert.ToInt32(row.Cells[7].Value) < Convert.ToInt32(row.Cells[10].Value)) 
     {
         row.DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.Red; 
     }
3
  • 1
    Thank you for the help Ricardo. I have tried the code you suggested. I still can't get it to work. Would you mind taking a look at this code and tell me where I've gone wrong? I am a beginning C# student. I'm sure I just haven't written the comparison code correctly. foreach (DataGridView row in vendorsDataGridView.Rows) { if (row.Cells[7].Value is < row.Cells[10].Value) { dataGridViewTextBoxColumn7.DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = red; } } I appreciate your help. EB
    – EB.
    Feb 4, 2010 at 21:54
  • EB I added new code based in the code you provided. Your sintax was off a little bit, try the code I just added above. Feb 5, 2010 at 1:52
  • 2
    Ricardo. I changed .text to .value and changed to DefaultCellstyle.Backcolor = color.red and the code worked!!! Thank you for your time! EB
    – EB.
    Feb 5, 2010 at 3:48
74

I was just investigating this issue (so I know this question was published almost 3 years ago, but maybe it will help someone... ) but it seems that a better option is to place the code inside the RowPrePaint event so that you don't have to traverse every row, only those that get painted (so it will perform much better on large amount of data:

Attach to the event

this.dataGridView1.RowPrePaint 
    += new System.Windows.Forms.DataGridViewRowPrePaintEventHandler(
        this.dataGridView1_RowPrePaint);

The event code

private void dataGridView1_RowPrePaint(object sender, DataGridViewRowPrePaintEventArgs e)
{
    if (Convert.ToInt32(dataGridView1.Rows[e.RowIndex].Cells[7].Text) < Convert.ToInt32(dataGridView1.Rows[e.RowIndex].Cells[10].Text)) 
    {
        dataGridView1.Rows[e.RowIndex].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.Beige;
    }
}
6
  • 3
    I really like how you catch the problem at the root instead of waiting until after everything has been painted. This is a very "outside the box" approach. Most people would rather just loop through every row again...
    – bird2920
    Mar 25, 2016 at 19:52
  • Next to being much faster, it also helps doing it at the right time. I had issues with my rows not getting colored, probably because I set the color at the wrong time. With this approach, it's guaranteed to happen at the correct time.
    – sanderd17
    Oct 12, 2016 at 12:33
  • 1
    This works geat. Also after sorting its refreshing in correct way.
    – macmuri
    Sep 5, 2019 at 7:32
  • Beautiful and efficient. Love it! Mar 5 at 14:15
  • Excellent ! Iterating 3000 rows and setting default cell style takes ~7 seconds. This solution takes almost nothing :-)
    – DueGe
    Aug 11 at 8:29
26

You're looking for the CellFormatting event.
Here is an example.

1
  • 2
    The difference with this approach is that every single cell will be compared as opposed to just one. It might be a performance problem if you have several hundred cells. Jul 12, 2012 at 18:52
21

I had trouble changing the text color as well - I never saw the color change.

Until I added the code to change the text color to the event DataBindingsComplete for DataGridView. After that it worked.

I hope this will help people who face the same problem.

1
  • text coulour doesnt change when in onLoad(..) override or the event. DataBindingsComplete is much better place to do the colour setting of rows.
    – timothy
    Jun 16, 2015 at 11:45
13

Something like the following... assuming the values in the cells are Integers.

foreach (DataGridViewRow dgvr in myDGV.Rows)
{
  if (dgvr.Cells[7].Value < dgvr.Cells[10].Value)
  {
    dgvr.DefaultCellStyle.ForeColor = Color.Red;
  }
}

untested, so apologies for any error.

If you know the particular row, you can skip the iteration:

if (myDGV.Rows[theRowIndex].Cells[7].Value < myDGV.Rows[theRowIndex].Cells[10].Value)
{
  dgvr.DefaultCellStyle.ForeColor = Color.Red;
}
3
  • Thank you for your help. Your suggestion is the closest I've gotten to solving the problem. But I keep getting the error saying either "Value" doesn't exist in context or "Cells" doesn't exist in context. Trying to figure it out...
    – EB.
    Feb 5, 2010 at 1:22
  • this line of code (dgvr.Cells[7].Value < dgvr.Cells[10].Value) now gives me this error Operator '<' cannot be applied to operands of type 'object' and 'object'
    – EB.
    Feb 5, 2010 at 1:30
  • Cast them to Integer, then. :-) something like: Convert.ToInt32(dvgr.Cells[7].Value) < Convert.ToInt32(dgvr.Cells[10].Value)
    – Demi
    Feb 5, 2010 at 2:12
9

Some people like to use the Paint, CellPainting or CellFormatting events, but note that changing a style in these events causes recursive calls. If you use DataBindingComplete it will execute only once. The argument for CellFormatting is that it is called only on visible cells, so you don't have to format non-visible cells, but you format them multiple times.

5

You can Change Backcolor row by row using your condition.and this function call after applying Datasource of DatagridView.

Here Is the function for that. Simply copy that and put it after Databind

private void ChangeRowColor()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < gvItem.Rows.Count; i++)
    {
        if (BindList[i].MainID == 0 && !BindList[i].SchemeID.HasValue)
            gvItem.Rows[i].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = ColorTranslator.FromHtml("#C9CADD");
        else if (BindList[i].MainID > 0 && !BindList[i].SchemeID.HasValue)
            gvItem.Rows[i].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = ColorTranslator.FromHtml("#DDC9C9");
        else if (BindList[i].MainID > 0)
            gvItem.Rows[i].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = ColorTranslator.FromHtml("#D5E8D7");
        else
            gvItem.Rows[i].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.White;
    }
}
3
private void dtGrdVwRFIDTags_DataSourceChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    dtGrdVwRFIDTags.Refresh();
    this.dtGrdVwRFIDTags.Columns[1].Visible = false;

    foreach (DataGridViewRow row in this.dtGrdVwRFIDTags.Rows)
    {
        if (row.Cells["TagStatus"].Value != null 
            && row.Cells["TagStatus"].Value.ToString() == "Lost" 
            || row.Cells["TagStatus"].Value != null 
            && row.Cells["TagStatus"].Value.ToString() == "Damaged" 
            || row.Cells["TagStatus"].Value != null 
            && row.Cells["TagStatus"].Value.ToString() == "Discarded")
        {
            row.DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.LightGray;
            row.DefaultCellStyle.Font = new Font("Tahoma", 8, FontStyle.Bold);
        }
        else
        {
            row.DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.Ivory;
        }
    }  

    //for (int i= 0 ; i<dtGrdVwRFIDTags.Rows.Count - 1; i++)
    //{
    //    if (dtGrdVwRFIDTags.Rows[i].Cells[3].Value.ToString() == "Damaged")
    //    {
    //        dtGrdVwRFIDTags.Rows[i].Cells["TagStatus"].Style.BackColor = Color.Red;                   
    //    }
    //}
}
2

This is my solution to change color to dataGridView with bindingDataSource:

private void dataGridViewECO_DataBindingComplete(object sender, DataGridViewBindingCompleteEventArgs e)
{            

    if (e.ListChangedType != ListChangedType.ItemDeleted)
    {

        DataGridViewCellStyle green = this.dataGridViewECO.DefaultCellStyle.Clone();
        green.BackColor = Color.Green;

        DataGridViewCellStyle gray = this.dataGridViewECO.DefaultCellStyle.Clone();
        gray.BackColor = Color.LightGray;



        foreach (DataGridViewRow r in this.dataGridViewECO.Rows)
        {

            if (r.Cells[8].Value != null)
            {

                String stato = r.Cells[8].Value.ToString();


                if (!" Open ".Equals(stato))
                {
                    r.DefaultCellStyle = gray;
                }
                else
                {
                    r.DefaultCellStyle = green;
                }
            }

        }

    }
}
2

If you bind to a (collection) of concrete objects, you can get the that concrete object via the DataBoundItem property of the row. (To avoid check for magic strings in the cell and using "real" properties of the object)

Skeleton example below:

DTO/POCO

public class Employee
{
    public int EmployeeKey {get;set;}

    public string LastName {get;set;}

    public string FirstName {get;set;}

    public bool IsActive {get;set;}
}       

Binding to the datagridview

    private void BindData(ICollection<Employee> emps)
    {
        System.ComponentModel.BindingList<Employee> bindList = new System.ComponentModel.BindingList<Employee>(emps.OrderBy(emp => emp.LastName).ThenBy(emp => emp.FirstName).ToList());
        this.dgvMyDataGridView.DataSource = bindList;
    }       

then the event handler and getting the concrete object (instead of a DataGridRow and/or cells)

        private void dgvMyDataGridView_RowPrePaint(object sender, DataGridViewRowPrePaintEventArgs e)
        {
            Employee concreteSelectedRowItem = this.dgvMyDataGridView.Rows[e.RowIndex].DataBoundItem as Employee;
            if (null != concreteSelectedRowItem && !concreteSelectedRowItem.IsActive)
            {
                dgvMyDataGridView.Rows[e.RowIndex].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.LightGray;
            }
        }
0

I typically Like to use the GridView.RowDataBound Event event for this.

protected void OrdersGridView_RowDataBound(object sender, GridViewRowEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.DataRow)
    {
        e.Row.ForeColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
    }
}
1
  • 1
    He is asked for DatagridView in Window Application. And your answer is about GridView of Web. Oct 17, 2014 at 8:45
0

Works on Visual Studio 2010. (I tried it and it works!) It will paint your entire row.

  1. Create a button for the datagridview.
  2. Create a CellClick event and put the next line of code inside of it.

if (dataGridView3.Columns[e.ColumnIndex].Index.Equals(0)    
{
    dataGridView3.Rows[e.RowIndex].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.Beige;
}
0

You have not mentioned how value is changed. I have used similar functionality when user is entering value. i.e. entering and leaving edit mode.

Using CellEndEdit event of datagridview.

private void dgMapTable_CellEndEdit(object sender, DataGridViewCellEventArgs e)
{
    double newInteger;

    if (double.TryParse(dgMapTable[e.ColumnIndex,e.RowIndex].Value.ToString(), out newInteger)
    {
        if (newInteger < 0 || newInteger > 50)
        {
            dgMapTable[e.ColumnIndex, e.RowIndex].Style.BackColor = Color.Red; 

            dgMapTable[e.ColumnIndex, e.RowIndex].ErrorText 
                = "Keep value in Range:" + "0 to " + "50";
        }
    }                               
}

You may add logic for clearing error notification in a similar way.

if in your case, if data is loaded programmatically, then CellLeave event can be used with same code.

0

With this code, you only change rows backcolor where columname value is null other rows color still the default one.

       foreach (DataGridViewRow row in dataGridView1.Rows)
                {
                    if (row.Cells["columnname"].Value != null)
                    {
                        dataGridView1.AlternatingRowsDefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.MistyRose;
                    }
                 }
0

Just a note about setting DefaultCellStyle.BackColor...you can't set it to any transparent value except Color.Empty. That's the default value. That falsely implies (to me, anyway) that transparent colors are OK. They're not. Every row I set to a transparent color just draws the color of selected-rows.

I spent entirely too much time beating my head against the wall over this issue.

0

I landed here looking for a solution for the case where I dont use data binding. Nothing worked for me but I got it in the end with:

dataGridView.Columns.Clear(); 
dataGridView.Rows.Clear();
dataGridView.Refresh();
0

If you are the second dumbest developer on the planet (me being the dumbest), all of the above solutions seem to work: CellFormatting, DataSourceChanged, and RowPrePaint. I prefer RowPrePaint.

I struggled with this (for way too long) because I needed to override my SelectionBackColor and SelectionForeColor instead of BackColor and ForeColor as I was changing the selected row.

0
int counter = gridEstimateSales.Rows.Count;

for (int i = 0; i < counter; i++)
{
    if (i == counter-1)
    {
        //this is where your LAST LINE code goes
        //row.DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.Yellow;
        gridEstimateSales.Rows[i].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.Red;
    }
    else
    {
        //this is your normal code NOT LAST LINE
        //row.DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.Red;
        gridEstimateSales.Rows[i].DefaultCellStyle.BackColor = Color.White;
    }
}
0
dataGridView1.Rows[1].Cells[1].Style.BackColor = Color.Yellow;


    
0

if (this.dgblista.Columns[e.ColumnIndex].Name == "TOTAL PAGADO") { if ((dgblista.Columns[e.ColumnIndex].Name == "COSTO DEL CURSO") == (dgblista.Columns[e.ColumnIndex].Name == "TOTAL PAGADO")) { e.CellStyle.ForeColor = Color.White; e.CellStyle.BackColor = Color.Red; } }

1
  • 1
    I don't know if your answer is correct or at least useful, but you should at least format it a little bit. Use four blanks at the beginning of your code and it will be automatically formatted as a code section. Just a hint for a newbie.
    – Aranxo
    Jul 18 at 1:42

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