140

How in node to split string by newline ('\n') ? I have simple string like var a = "test.js\nagain.js" and I need to get ["test.js", "again.js"]. I tried

a.split("\n");
a.split("\\n");
a.split("\r\n");
a.split("\r");

but none of above doesn't work.

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  • possible duplicate of JavaScript string newline character? – Mene Feb 20 '14 at 0:28
  • 7
    split() doesn't modify the original string. – thgaskell Feb 20 '14 at 2:19
  • This looks like a pure JavaScript question, not requiring a node.js tag. – Wyck Jan 29 at 15:36
  • @Wyck, it's useful to know that Node is the intended runtime, because the newline character in a string is often platform-dependent. In Node.js, it's very common to operate on file texts with newline characters, and it's important to know the platform. In a browser context, this this less of an issue. But I would suggest the OP change the question to specify the target environment, or else ask for solutions that work generically on all major platforms. – Austin Davis Sep 7 at 1:42
254

Try splitting on a regex like /\r?\n/ to be usable by both Windows and UNIX systems.

> "a\nb\r\nc".split(/\r?\n/)
[ 'a', 'b', 'c' ]
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  • 3
    What about classic Macs? ;) – AshleyF Nov 7 '15 at 0:03
  • 10
    classic Macs died along with Steve Jobs... sadness :( – ymz Jun 15 '17 at 19:23
  • 46
    to catch \n, \r and \r\n: split(/[\r\n]+/) – Julian TF Jul 26 '17 at 10:15
  • 2
    MacOSX don't use single \r anymore, that was only for old Macs. I think they have the same \n as other unixes. – jcubic Dec 10 '17 at 9:10
  • 13
    /[\r\n]+/ will filter out empty lines – Spongman Jul 7 '18 at 18:44
49

If the file is native to your system (certainly no guarantees of that), then Node can help you out:

var os = require('os');

a.split(os.EOL);

This is usually more useful for constructing output strings from Node though, for platform portability.

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  • 5
    Yeah, you generally shouldn't do this. You should parse newlines regardless of the platform. – 1j01 Nov 5 '16 at 19:27
  • I highlight that this is specifically for the case of files native to your system in the very first sentence. The answer above is appropriate for when this is unknown or mixed. – qubyte Nov 6 '16 at 10:05
  • Right. Or when it's "known" now but might change in the future. – 1j01 Nov 6 '16 at 23:24
  • only works when loading files on the platform they were created on. – Spongman Jul 7 '18 at 18:44
34

It looks like regex /\r\n|\r|\n/ handles CR, LF, and CRLF line endings, their mixed sequences, and keeps all the empty lines inbetween. Try that!

function splitLines(t) { return t.split(/\r\n|\r|\n/); }

// single newlines
splitLines("AAA\rBBB\nCCC\r\nDDD");
// double newlines
splitLines("EEE\r\rFFF\n\nGGG\r\n\r\nHHH");
// mixed sequences
splitLines("III\n\r\nJJJ\r\r\nKKK\r\n\nLLL\r\n\rMMM");

You should get these arrays as a result:

[ "AAA", "BBB", "CCC", "DDD" ]
[ "EEE", "", "FFF", "", "GGG", "", "HHH" ]
[ "III", "", "JJJ", "", "KKK", "", "LLL", "", "MMM" ]

You can also teach that regex to recognize other legit Unicode line terminators by adding |\xHH or |\uHHHH parts, where H's are hexadecimal digits of the additional terminator character codepoint (as seen in Wikipedia article as U+HHHH).

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31
a = a.split("\n");

Note that splitting returns the new array, rather than just assigning it to the original string. You need to explicitly store it in a variable.

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17

A solution that works with all possible line endings including mixed ones and keeping empty lines as well can be achieved using two replaces and one split as follows

text.replace(/\r\n/g, "\r").replace(/\n/g, "\r").split(/\r/);

some code to test it

  var CR = "\x0D";  //   \r
  var LF = "\x0A";  //   \n

  var mixedfile = "00" + CR + LF +            // 1 x win
                  "01" + LF +                 // 1 x linux
                  "02" + CR +                 // 1 x old mac
                  "03" + CR + CR +            // 2 x old mac
                  "05" + LF + LF +            // 2 x linux
                  "07" + CR + LF + CR + LF +  // 2 x win
                  "09";

  function showarr (desc, arr)
  {
     console.log ("// ----- " + desc);
     for (var ii in arr)
        console.log (ii + ") [" + arr[ii] +  "] (len = " + arr[ii].length + ")");
  }

  showarr ("using 2 replace + 1 split", 
           mixedfile.replace(/\r\n/g, "\r").replace(/\n/g, "\r").split(/\r/));

and the output

  // ----- using 2 replace + 1 split
  0) [00] (len = 2)
  1) [01] (len = 2)
  2) [02] (len = 2)
  3) [03] (len = 2)
  4) [] (len = 0)
  5) [05] (len = 2)
  6) [] (len = 0)
  7) [07] (len = 2)
  8) [] (len = 0)
  9) [09] (len = 2)
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  • 1
    Actually the solution given by blakkwater: text.split(/\r\n|\n|\r/); do the same and it is shorter and faster – Alejadro Xalabarder Jan 11 '19 at 16:23
8

The first one should work:

> "a\nb".split("\n");
[ 'a', 'b' ]
> var a = "test.js\nagain.js"
undefined
> a.split("\n");
[ 'test.js', 'again.js' ]
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4

I made an eol module for working with line endings in node or browsers. It has a split method like

var lines = eol.split(text)
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