190

In Python, how do you find the number of digits in an integer?

  • 1
    I don't understand your question. Did you mean the size of an integer? Do you want to find the number of digits? Please clarify. – batbrat Feb 3 '10 at 4:59
  • 1
    Sorry, the number of digits – Strigoides Feb 3 '10 at 5:03

16 Answers 16

251

If you want the length of an integer as in the number of digits in the integer, you can always convert it to string like str(133) and find its length like len(str(123)).

  • 13
    Of course, if you're looking for the number of digits, this will produce a result that's too large for negative numbers, since it will count the negative sign. – Chris Upchurch Feb 3 '10 at 5:03
  • 70
    len(str(abs(v))) if you are worried about the negative sign ... – wisty Feb 3 '10 at 6:00
  • 15
    Hey, this is a slow solution. I did a factorial of a random 6 digit number, and found its length. This method took 95.891 seconds. And Math.log10 method took only 7.486343383789062e-05 seconds, approximately 1501388 times faster! – FadedCoder Mar 19 '17 at 16:30
204

Without conversion to string

import math
digits = int(math.log10(n))+1

To also handle zero and negative numbers

import math
if n > 0:
    digits = int(math.log10(n))+1
elif n == 0:
    digits = 1
else:
    digits = int(math.log10(-n))+2 # +1 if you don't count the '-' 

You'd probably want to put that in a function :)

Here are some benchmarks. The len(str()) is already behind for even quite small numbers

timeit math.log10(2**8)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 746 ns per loop
timeit len(str(2**8))
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.1 µs per loop

timeit math.log10(2**100)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 775 ns per loop
 timeit len(str(2**100))
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.2 µs per loop

timeit math.log10(2**10000)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 844 ns per loop
timeit len(str(2**10000))
100 loops, best of 3: 10.3 ms per loop
  • 4
    Using log10 for this is a mathematician's solution; using len(str()) is a programmer's solution, and is clearer and simpler. – Glenn Maynard Feb 3 '10 at 7:01
  • 54
    @Glenn: I certainly hope you aren't implying this is a bad solution. The programmer's naive O(log10 n) solution works well in ad-hoc, prototyping code -- but I'd much rather see mathematicians elegant O(1) solution in production code or a public API. +1 for gnibbler. – Juliet Feb 3 '10 at 8:48
  • 5
    @gnibbler: +1. Never realized that log10 can be used to find the magnitude of a number. Wish I could up-vote more then once :). – Abbas Dec 20 '10 at 18:10
  • 13
    Hi! I go something strange, can Anyone of You please explain me why int(math.log10(x)) +1 for 99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999 (71 nines) returns 72 ? I thought that I could rely on log10 method but I have to use len(str(x)) instead :( – Marecky Mar 4 '12 at 1:19
  • 6
    I believe i know the reason for the strange behaviour, it is due to floating point inaccuracies eg. math.log10(999999999999999) is equal to 14.999999999999998 so int(math.log10(999999999999999)) becomes 14. But then math.log10(9999999999999999) is equal to 16.0. Maybe using round is a solution to this problem. – jamylak Apr 6 '12 at 1:22
30

All math.log10 solutions will give you problems.

math.log10 is fast but gives problem when your number is greater than 999999999999997. This is because the float have too many .9s, causing the result to round up.

The solution is to use a while counter method for numbers above that threshold.

To make this even faster, create 10^16, 10^17 so on so forth and store as variables in a list. That way, it is like a table lookup.

def getIntegerPlaces(theNumber):
    if theNumber <= 999999999999997:
        return int(math.log10(theNumber)) + 1
    else:
        counter = 15
        while theNumber >= 10**counter:
            counter += 1
        return counter
  • Thank you. That is a good counter-example for math.log10. It's interesting to see how binary representation flips the values giving mathematically incorrect result. – WloHu Aug 28 '18 at 12:31
  • then len(str(num)) would be better – Vighnesh Raut Jul 27 at 13:07
21

Python 2.* ints take either 4 or 8 bytes (32 or 64 bits), depending on your Python build. sys.maxint (2**31-1 for 32-bit ints, 2**63-1 for 64-bit ints) will tell you which of the two possibilities obtains.

In Python 3, ints (like longs in Python 2) can take arbitrary sizes up to the amount of available memory; sys.getsizeof gives you a good indication for any given value, although it does also count some fixed overhead:

>>> import sys
>>> sys.getsizeof(0)
12
>>> sys.getsizeof(2**99)
28

If, as other answers suggests, you're thinking about some string representation of the integer value, then just take the len of that representation, be it in base 10 or otherwise!

  • Sorry this answer got minus-ed. It is informative and to the plausible point of the question (if it were only more specific about which 'len' is desired). +1 – mjv Feb 3 '10 at 5:36
  • This looks interesting but not sure how to extract the length – Tjorriemorrie Jul 18 '18 at 2:14
13

Well, without converting to string I would do something like:

def lenDigits(x): 
    """
    Assumes int(x)
    """

    x = abs(x)

    if x < 10:
        return 1

    return 1 + lenDigits(x / 10)

Minimalist recursion FTW

13

Let the number be n then the number of digits in n is given by:

math.floor(math.log10(n))+1

Note that this will give correct answers for +ve integers < 10e15. Beyond that the precision limits of the return type of math.log10 kicks in and the answer may be off by 1. I would simply use len(str(n)) beyond that; this requires O(log(n)) time which is same as iterating over powers of 10.

Thanks to @SetiVolkylany for bringing my attenstion to this limitation. Its amazing how seemingly correct solutions have caveats in implementation details.

  • It does not work if n outside of range [-999999999999997, 999999999999997] – Seti Volkylany Mar 11 '17 at 13:16
  • @SetiVolkylany, I tested it till 50 digits for python2.7 and 3.5. Just do a assert list(range(1,51)) == [math.floor(math.log10(n))+1 for n in (10**e for e in range(50))]. – BiGYaN Mar 12 '17 at 19:28
  • 1
    try it with the Python2.7 or the Python3.5 >>> math.floor(math.log10(999999999999997))+1 15.0 >>> math.floor(math.log10(999999999999998))+1 16.0. Look my answer stackoverflow.com/a/42736085/6003870. – Seti Volkylany Mar 13 '17 at 9:11
  • @SetiVolkylany, thanks. Edited. +1-ed. – BiGYaN Mar 13 '17 at 22:52
7

It's been several years since this question was asked, but I have compiled a benchmark of several methods to calculate the length of an integer.

def libc_size(i): 
    return libc.snprintf(buf, 100, c_char_p(b'%i'), i) # equivalent to `return snprintf(buf, 100, "%i", i);`

def str_size(i):
    return len(str(i)) # Length of `i` as a string

def math_size(i):
    return 1 + math.floor(math.log10(i)) # 1 + floor of log10 of i

def exp_size(i):
    return int("{:.5e}".format(i).split("e")[1]) + 1 # e.g. `1e10` -> `10` + 1 -> 11

def mod_size(i):
    return len("%i" % i) # Uses string modulo instead of str(i)

def fmt_size(i):
    return len("{0}".format(i)) # Same as above but str.format

(the libc function requires some setup, which I haven't included)

size_exp is thanks to Brian Preslopsky, size_str is thanks to GeekTantra, and size_math is thanks to John La Rooy

Here are the results:

Time for libc size:      1.2204 μs
Time for string size:    309.41 ns
Time for math size:      329.54 ns
Time for exp size:       1.4902 μs
Time for mod size:       249.36 ns
Time for fmt size:       336.63 ns
In order of speed (fastest first):
+ mod_size (1.000000x)
+ str_size (1.240835x)
+ math_size (1.321577x)
+ fmt_size (1.350007x)
+ libc_size (4.894290x)
+ exp_size (5.976219x)

(Disclaimer: the function is run on inputs 1 to 1,000,000)

Here are the results for sys.maxsize - 100000 to sys.maxsize:

Time for libc size:      1.4686 μs
Time for string size:    395.76 ns
Time for math size:      485.94 ns
Time for exp size:       1.6826 μs
Time for mod size:       364.25 ns
Time for fmt size:       453.06 ns
In order of speed (fastest first):
+ mod_size (1.000000x)
+ str_size (1.086498x)
+ fmt_size (1.243817x)
+ math_size (1.334066x)
+ libc_size (4.031780x)
+ exp_size (4.619188x)

As you can see, mod_size (len("%i" % i)) is the fastest, slightly faster than using str(i) and significantly faster than others.

6

As mentioned the dear user @Calvintwr, the function math.log10 has problem in a number outside of a range [-999999999999997, 999999999999997], where we get floating point errors. I had this problem with the JavaScript (the Google V8 and the NodeJS) and the C (the GNU GCC compiler), so a 'purely mathematically' solution is impossible here.


Based on this gist and the answer the dear user @Calvintwr

import math


def get_count_digits(number: int):
    """Return number of digits in a number."""

    if number == 0:
        return 1

    number = abs(number)

    if number <= 999999999999997:
        return math.floor(math.log10(number)) + 1

    count = 0
    while number:
        count += 1
        number //= 10
    return count

I tested it on numbers with length up to 20 (inclusive) and all right. It must be enough, because the length max integer number on a 64-bit system is 19 (len(str(sys.maxsize)) == 19).

assert get_count_digits(-99999999999999999999) == 20
assert get_count_digits(-10000000000000000000) == 20
assert get_count_digits(-9999999999999999999) == 19
assert get_count_digits(-1000000000000000000) == 19
assert get_count_digits(-999999999999999999) == 18
assert get_count_digits(-100000000000000000) == 18
assert get_count_digits(-99999999999999999) == 17
assert get_count_digits(-10000000000000000) == 17
assert get_count_digits(-9999999999999999) == 16
assert get_count_digits(-1000000000000000) == 16
assert get_count_digits(-999999999999999) == 15
assert get_count_digits(-100000000000000) == 15
assert get_count_digits(-99999999999999) == 14
assert get_count_digits(-10000000000000) == 14
assert get_count_digits(-9999999999999) == 13
assert get_count_digits(-1000000000000) == 13
assert get_count_digits(-999999999999) == 12
assert get_count_digits(-100000000000) == 12
assert get_count_digits(-99999999999) == 11
assert get_count_digits(-10000000000) == 11
assert get_count_digits(-9999999999) == 10
assert get_count_digits(-1000000000) == 10
assert get_count_digits(-999999999) == 9
assert get_count_digits(-100000000) == 9
assert get_count_digits(-99999999) == 8
assert get_count_digits(-10000000) == 8
assert get_count_digits(-9999999) == 7
assert get_count_digits(-1000000) == 7
assert get_count_digits(-999999) == 6
assert get_count_digits(-100000) == 6
assert get_count_digits(-99999) == 5
assert get_count_digits(-10000) == 5
assert get_count_digits(-9999) == 4
assert get_count_digits(-1000) == 4
assert get_count_digits(-999) == 3
assert get_count_digits(-100) == 3
assert get_count_digits(-99) == 2
assert get_count_digits(-10) == 2
assert get_count_digits(-9) == 1
assert get_count_digits(-1) == 1
assert get_count_digits(0) == 1
assert get_count_digits(1) == 1
assert get_count_digits(9) == 1
assert get_count_digits(10) == 2
assert get_count_digits(99) == 2
assert get_count_digits(100) == 3
assert get_count_digits(999) == 3
assert get_count_digits(1000) == 4
assert get_count_digits(9999) == 4
assert get_count_digits(10000) == 5
assert get_count_digits(99999) == 5
assert get_count_digits(100000) == 6
assert get_count_digits(999999) == 6
assert get_count_digits(1000000) == 7
assert get_count_digits(9999999) == 7
assert get_count_digits(10000000) == 8
assert get_count_digits(99999999) == 8
assert get_count_digits(100000000) == 9
assert get_count_digits(999999999) == 9
assert get_count_digits(1000000000) == 10
assert get_count_digits(9999999999) == 10
assert get_count_digits(10000000000) == 11
assert get_count_digits(99999999999) == 11
assert get_count_digits(100000000000) == 12
assert get_count_digits(999999999999) == 12
assert get_count_digits(1000000000000) == 13
assert get_count_digits(9999999999999) == 13
assert get_count_digits(10000000000000) == 14
assert get_count_digits(99999999999999) == 14
assert get_count_digits(100000000000000) == 15
assert get_count_digits(999999999999999) == 15
assert get_count_digits(1000000000000000) == 16
assert get_count_digits(9999999999999999) == 16
assert get_count_digits(10000000000000000) == 17
assert get_count_digits(99999999999999999) == 17
assert get_count_digits(100000000000000000) == 18
assert get_count_digits(999999999999999999) == 18
assert get_count_digits(1000000000000000000) == 19
assert get_count_digits(9999999999999999999) == 19
assert get_count_digits(10000000000000000000) == 20
assert get_count_digits(99999999999999999999) == 20

All example of codes tested with the Python 3.5

3

For posterity, no doubt by far the slowest solution to this problem:

def num_digits(num, number_of_calls=1):
    "Returns the number of digits of an integer num."
    if num == 0 or num == -1:
        return 1 if number_of_calls == 1 else 0
    else:
        return 1 + num_digits(num/10, number_of_calls+1)
2
from math import log10
digits = lambda n: ((n==0) and 1) or int(log10(abs(n)))+1
1

Assuming you are asking for the largest number you can store in an integer, the value is implementation dependent. I suggest that you don't think in that way when using python. In any case, quite a large value can be stored in a python 'integer'. Remember, Python uses duck typing!

Edit: I gave my answer before the clarification that the asker wanted the number of digits. For that, I agree with the method suggested by the accepted answer. Nothing more to add!

1
def length(i):
  return len(str(i))
1

It can be done for integers quickly by using:

len(str(abs(1234567890)))

Which gets the length of the string of the absolute value of "1234567890"

abs returns the number WITHOUT any negatives (only the magnitude of the number), str casts/converts it to a string and len returns the string length of that string.

If you want it to work for floats, you can use either of the following:

# Ignore all after decimal place
len(str(abs(0.1234567890)).split(".")[0])

# Ignore just the decimal place
len(str(abs(0.1234567890)))-1

For future reference.

  • I think it would be simpler to truncate the input number itself (e. g. with a cast to int) than to truncate its decimal string representation: len(str(abs(int(0.1234567890)))) returns 1. – David Foerster Jul 12 '17 at 11:21
  • No, that wouldn't work. If you turn 0.17 into an integer you get 0 and the length of that would be different to the length of 0.17 – Frogboxe Jul 12 '17 at 11:26
  • In the first case, by truncating everything from and including the decimal point off the string representation you're effectively calculating the length of the integral part of the number, which is what my suggestion does too. For 0.17 both solutions return 1. – David Foerster Jul 12 '17 at 11:32
1

Count the number of digits w/o convert integer to a string:

x=123
x=abs(x)
i = 0
while x >= 10**i:
    i +=1
# i is the number of digits
0

Format in scientific notation and pluck off the exponent:

int("{:.5e}".format(1000000).split("e")[1]) + 1

I don't know about speed, but it's simple.

Please note the number of significant digits after the decimal (the "5" in the ".5e" can be an issue if it rounds up the decimal part of the scientific notation to another digit. I set it arbitrarily large, but could reflect the length of the largest number you know about.

-11
>>> a=12345
>>> a.__str__().__len__()
5
  • 6
    Do not directly call special methods. That is written len(str(a)). – Mike Graham Feb 3 '10 at 5:33
  • 8
    @ghostdog74 Just because there's an electrical socket, doesn't mean you have to stick your fingers in it. – user97370 Feb 3 '10 at 5:48
  • 3
    so if you are so against it, why don't you tell me what's wrong with using it? – ghostdog74 Feb 3 '10 at 5:51
  • 10
    "Magic" __ methods are there for Python internals to call back into, not for your code to call directly. It's the Hollywood Framework pattern: don't call us, we'll call you. But the intent of this framework is that these are magic methods for the standard Python built-ins to make use of, so that your class can customize the behavior of the built-in. If it is a method for your code to call directly, give the method a non-"__" name. This clearly separates those methods that are intended for programmer consumption, vs. those that are provided for callback from Python built-ins. – PaulMcG Feb 3 '10 at 6:08
  • 7
    It'sa bad idea because everyone else in the known universe uses str() and len(). This is being different for the sake of being different, which is inherently a bad thing--not to mention it's just ugly as hell. -1. – Glenn Maynard Feb 3 '10 at 7:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.