I wrote some VB code that I converted to C# using Sharp Develop IDE. I defined an Interface, IElement, that is implemented by objects that return XML representations of themselves. Any object that implements this interface should be able to return its TagName and it's XML string representation. To get the it's XML string, it may have to loop through its child/nested collection to get the XML representation of all of its child objects.

Classes that inherit from Element can use the GetXml and GetNestedXml of its base class or choose to override it but the GetNestedXml function would not need to be public because it would only be called from the public GetXml function of derived classes. Therefore, in the original VB version, the scope of the GetNestedXML was set to protected. However, Sharp Develop and I have issues trying to convert this code to C#. Please see the error below.

On a side note, I do realize that there might be better ways to implement this and I would be interested in side suggestions that are easy on flames. :-) Thanks.

Public Interface IElement

    ReadOnly Property TagName() As String
    ReadOnly Property GetXml(Optional ByVal targetXml As Integer = TargetXmlEnum.All) As String
    Function GetNestedXml() As String

End Interface


Public Class Element

    Implements IElement

    Public ReadOnly Property TagName() As String Implements IElement.TagName
        Get
            '....
        End Get
    End Property

     Public Overridable ReadOnly Property GetXml(Optional ByVal targetXml As Integer = TargetXmlEnum.All) _
            As String Implements IElement.GetXml
        Get
            '....
        End Get
    End Property

    Protected Overridable Function GetNestedXml() As String Implements IElement.GetNestedXml
        '....
    End Function

End Class

Converted C# :

public interface IElement
{

    string TagName { get; }
    string GetXml { get; }
    string GetNestedXml();

}

public class Element : IElement
{
    public string TagName {
        get { //... }
    }

    public virtual string GetXml 
    {
        get 
        {
            //...
        }
    }

    protected virtual string GetNestedXml()
    {
        //...
    }
}

error:

Error   1   'Smit.SpreadsheetML.Element' does not implement interface member 'Smit.SpreadsheetML.IElement.GetNestedXml()'. 'Smit.SpreadsheetML.Element.GetNestedXml()' cannot implement an interface member because it is not public.   D:\Users\Chad\Desktop\SMIT\SMIT.SpreadsheetML.ConvertedToC#\Element.cs  41  24  Smit.SpreadsheetML.Converted
  • Yeah, I did try that but the error persisted. In any event, it seemed like something worth adding even if it doesn't fix the issue at hand. Thanks. – ChadD Feb 20 '14 at 5:31
  • Just remove Protected from "protected virtual string GetNestedXml()" implementation – Milan Raval Feb 20 '14 at 5:42
  • 1
    @MilanRaval it will give error to virtual part if protected is removed. – Saghir A. Khatri Feb 20 '14 at 5:44
  • 1
    I mean protected and virtual both, and why you want virtual over there ? – Milan Raval Feb 20 '14 at 5:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The quick way to solve this is to make GetNestedXml public. If you don't want this, you can also declare GetNestedXml as a protected abstract method in an abstract base class. But this means that all classes need to derive from this base class and implement the method. If you want to provide an implementation in the base class, you can also make the method virtual so that the derived classes can but do not necessarily need to override it. In order to achieve this, perform the following steps:

  1. Create a new abstract base class.
  2. Add a protected abstract/virtual implementation of GetNestedXml(). If it is virtual, also provide a method body (and you do not need to make the class abstract).
  3. Remove the method from the interface.
  4. Derive all classes that implement the interface (and want to have the comfort of the basic implementation GetNestedXml) from the base class.

Another way to hide the method would be to implement IElement explicitly, so that the the callers only see it when they access the object using the interface.

  • I prefer not to make it public and making the GetNestedXml function abstract means that inherited classed are forced to implement their own version of the function even if the base class' version sufficed. I would like inherited classed to be able to choose whether they wanted to use the base class or override it. – ChadD Feb 20 '14 at 5:41
  • @ChadD: if the fact that all classes have to derive from the base class is ok in your scenario, this is the best solution. You don't need to make the method abstract. You can also make it virtual and provide a basic implementation that the derived classes can override if needed. – Markus Feb 20 '14 at 5:43
  • I'm missing the part about what I need to do to make that happen. I think that that is what I had in the VB version. I did make it virtual and provide a base implementation. However, I don't want it to be public, only accessible from subclasses, hence protected. – ChadD Feb 20 '14 at 5:46
  • @ChadD: I've updated the answer with the steps that are required. – Markus Feb 20 '14 at 5:52
  • Yeah, removing the GetNestedXml from the Interface was the key, I think, to making it work. When I wrote "I'm open to suggestions for how to design this" I was asking myself if an interface was even helpful or if I should just put everything on the base class. I don't have strong OOP chops but my gut tells me to prefer interfaces because a class can implement many but only inherit from one base class, hence I would have more flexibility. I'm also a little puzzled why the VB code didn't convert quite so smoothly to C# on what appears to me to be basic OOP features. I expected only syntax diffs. – ChadD Feb 20 '14 at 6:07

As Interface implementations need to be public or explicit:

change this method

protected virtual string GetNestedXml()
{
     //...
}

to

protected virtual string IElement.GetNestedXml()
{
    //...
}

Edit

create an Interface like this:

public interface IElement
{
    string TagName { get; }
    string GetXml { get; }
}

create an abstract base class like this

abstract class ElementBase:IElement

{
    public abstract string TagName { get; }
    public abstract string GetXml { get; }
    protected abstract string GetNestedXml();
}

Impelement your Element class

public class Element : ElementBase
{
    public override string TagName {
        get { //... }
    }

    public override string GetXml 
    {
        get 
        {
            //...
        }
    }

    protected override string GetNestedXml()
    {
        //...
    }
}
  • When I tried to research this error on SO, I tried that without fully understanding it to see if the error went away first. It did not. I got 2 errors that both referred to the changed line: The modifier 'protected' is not valid for this item modifier 'virtual' is not valid for this item – ChadD Feb 20 '14 at 5:34
  • @ChadD check my edit in asnwer, i hope it helps you now – Saghir A. Khatri Feb 20 '14 at 6:00
  • Yep, several answers seem in line now and so I had difficulty choosing "the" answer. Thanks to all – ChadD Feb 20 '14 at 6:12
  • Thanks for asking such a question that let us learn stuff too. no worries for the "Answer" chad. Learning matters :) – Saghir A. Khatri Feb 20 '14 at 6:17

An interface declared the responsibilities of its all inheriting instances. So you can not use not-public method to implement your interface method.

If it is non-public for any reason else, I suggest that you can use abstract class and use a abstract/virtual method to declare it.

abstract method like this:

public interface IElement
{
    string TagName { get; }
    string GetXml { get; }
}

public abstract class ElementBase : IElement
{
    public string TagName { get; private set; }
    public string GetXml { get; private set; }
    protected abstract string GetNestedXml();
}

virtual method:

public interface IElement
{
    string TagName { get; }
    string GetXml { get; }
}

public abstract class ElementBase : IElement
{
    public string TagName { get; private set; }
    public string GetXml { get; private set; }

    protected virtual string GetNestedXml()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

The thing is, that when you declare Element implements IElement you say: "Hey, I know how to get my nested XML, and every one can use it! (public...)".

On your class the GetNestedXml is protected, i.e. you are not fulfilling your declaration.
Even if you do an explicit protected implementation:

    protected override string IElement.GetNestedXml()
    {
       //Implementation...
    }

Behind the scenes, It will still actually be public.

  • It sounds like you are suggesting what Saghir A. Khatri wrote. If so, please see my comment response. – ChadD Feb 20 '14 at 5:44
  • 1
    @ChadD His edit is correct. Another thing, there isn't enough information about the usage of the GetNestedXml. If it is a behavior expected from some classes, regardless to their inheritance tree, Interface is the way to go. Use the abstract is the way to go if this behavior is expected from a specific inheritance tree. Also, you might want to take a look at ixmlserializable It might be helpful... – Avi Turner Feb 20 '14 at 6:06

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