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I'd like to require the usage of MFA to IAM users when they log into the AWS Console. I know that's possible to do that for API access, but not sure whether is possible to achieve the same when logging into the Console.

3 Answers 3

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Update

You can enforce your requirement with an IAM Policy based on an IAM condition that specifies the aws:MultiFactorAuthAge key as outlined in section IAM Policies with MFA Conditions within Configuring MFA-Protected API Access - you can enforce this at two levels:

  • Existence — To simply verify that the user has been authenticated with MFA, check that the aws:MultiFactorAuthAge key is not null. (If the user has not been authenticated with MFA, this key doesn't exist and therefore is null.)
  • Duration — If you want to grant access only within a specified time after MFA authentication, use a numeric condition type to compare the key's age to a value (such as 3600 seconds).

Accordingly, a generic IAM policy for all AWS actions that simply tests for the existence of MFA authentication might look as follows:

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": "*",
      "Resource": "*", 
      "Condition":
      {
          "Null":{"aws:MultiFactorAuthAge":"false"}
      }
    }
  ]
}

Initial Answer

This is a case of 'it just works', i.e. there's nothing to be done regarding MFA-Protected Access for the AWS Management Console specifically, insofar the console uses the API in turn and calls every API action with the logged in user's IAM credentials accordingly (once a user has configured and enabled an MFA device, the login page will require entering the MFA token automatically) - see also section Using MFA-Protected APIs Through the Console within Configuring MFA-Protected API Access:

AWS evaluates MFA-protected API policies for actions in the console, such as terminating an Amazon EC2 instance. Set up the IAM user with an MFA device and enable an MFA-protected API policy. The user can then simply log into the console with MFA authentication and is subject to the policies for MFA-protected APIs. For users who already have an assigned MFA device, the console experience doesn't change (except for optional time limits on certain MFA-protected APIs that require more frequent re-authentication). For more information on setting up an IAM user with an MFA device, see Setting Up an MFA Device.

5
  • Maybe I didn't explain myself clearly enough. I understand that once you're logged into the Console the requests to the API will use that very same session, so if the logged user used MFA to authenticate himself, then that will affect the Console's requests. But my question is about how to enforce users to use MFA to log into the Console.
    – Andres
    Commented Feb 20, 2014 at 20:40
  • That's what I tried to imply by mentioning that once a user has configured and enabled an MFA device, the login page will require entering the MFA token automatically - put another way, you cannot log into the console without an MFA token once a MFA device is configured and enabled. And if it isn't, the respectively protected API actions will simply refuse to work and complain about missing authentication, just as they do when a required IAM permission isn't granted for a user (even without MFA). Commented Feb 21, 2014 at 0:08
  • Ok, so my question should be phrased: "How to enforce IAM users to configure and enable a MFA device"
    – Andres
    Commented Feb 21, 2014 at 15:20
  • 1
    @Andres - I've updated my answer with an example how to enforce MFA usage with IAM policies, sorry for letting this slip (and misinterpreting your question initially, despite your requirements being clearly stated right away in fact). Commented Mar 18, 2014 at 22:42
  • 1
    Thanks @SteffenOpel. I was wondering if you might also know how to let the user enable MFA device's themselves? As an admin I can set it up for them (with their co-operation over the phone/messaging), but if they are in a remote location with their device it's a bit cumbersome.
    – cavalcade
    Commented Sep 27, 2014 at 22:54
1

Requiring MFA for the Web Console

The IAM policy listed here will do the following:

  • Allow users to change their own password
  • Allow users to view and edit their own MFA devices (a necessary component to requiring them to have MFA)
  • Prevent users from doing most things if they logged in to the console without MFA
  • Still allow users to set up MFA if they logged in without it
  • Use API keys regardless of MFA

It is best to create this as an IAM policy, and then attach it to the user groups that have console users. You can also attach the policy to a user directly, but that's harder to manage.

Note that adding an MFA device to your account is insufficient to be able to access AWS resources; you need to have logged in with that MFA device for it to work. Thus, to get set up with MFA, you need to do the following steps:

  1. Sign in to the AWS console.
  2. In the top right, click the dropdown labeled with your username
  3. Go to "Security Credentials"
  4. Add an MFA device
  5. Log out
  6. Log back in using MFA; you can now use the AWS console normally

The IAM policy is the following:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "iam:ChangePassword",
                "iam:CreateVirtualMFADevice",
                "iam:EnableMFADevice",
                "iam:ResyncMFADevice",
                "iam:DeleteVirtualMFADevice",
                "iam:DeactivateMFADevice",
                "iam:ListMFADevices",
                "iam:ListVirtualMFADevices",
                "iam:ListAccessKeys",
                "iam:GetAccessKeyLastUsed",
                "iam:GetUser"
            ],
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:iam::*:mfa/${aws:username}",
                "arn:aws:iam::*:user/${aws:username}"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Sid": "BlockMostAccessUnlessSignedInWithMFA",
            "Effect": "Deny",
            "NotAction": [
                "iam:CreateVirtualMFADevice",
                "iam:ListVirtualMFADevices",
                "iam:EnableMFADevice",
                "iam:ResyncMFADevice",
                "iam:DeleteVirtualMFADevice",
                "iam:DeactivateMFADevice",
                "iam:ListAccountAliases",
                "iam:ListUsers",
                "iam:ListSSHPublicKeys",
                "iam:ListAccessKeys",
                "iam:GetAccessKeyLastUsed",
                "iam:ListServiceSpecificCredentials",
                "iam:ListMFADevices",
                "iam:GetAccountSummary",
                "iam:ChangePassword",
                "iam:GetUser",
                "sts:GetSessionToken"
            ],
            "Resource": "*",
            "Condition": {
                "Bool": {
                    "aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent": "false"
                }
            }
        }
    ]
}

Note that while this allows use of most of the AWS API without needing MFA, some API calls won't work. In particular, any calls that use temporary AWS authentication credentials will fail. For example:

  • Using ECR login, as this generates a temporary key that it gives to docker
  • Retrieving a value from AWS Secrets Manager, as this uses temporary credentials to talk to KMS
  • Elastic Beanstalk operations, as these seem to use temporary credentials internally

In order to do these things, you need to get MFA API credentials (see below). The other option (especially good for ECR login) is to create a less privileged user in a group that doesn't have the MFA Required policy to use for making the API calls in question.

Requiring MFA Everywhere

For enhanced security, you can require MFA access for both the web console and the API. To do this, change the condition in the above policy to be the following:

"Condition": {
    "BoolIfExists": {
        "aws:MultiFactorAuthPresent": "false"
    }
}

The reason that this works is that API calls with permanent credentials don't pass the MultiFactorAuthPresent key at all, whereas console requests always do. Changing this condition from Bool to BoolIfExists changes the condition to resolve to true if the MultiFactorAuthPresent key does not exist, which in turn blocks the requests.

To use the API with MFA, you need to use the sts get-session-token command. For example, with the AWS CLI:

# Get the serial number of your MFA device
aws --profile <PROFILE_NAME> iam list-mfa-devices --user-name <IAM_USER_NAME>

# Get temporary API keys that will pass MFA verification
aws --profile <PROFILE_NAME> sts get-session-token --serial-number <MFA_SERIAL_NUMBER> --token-code <MFA_TOKEN>

# Export the temporary credentials for use in subsequent calls
export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=<KEY>
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=<SECRET>
export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=<SESSION_TOKEN>

If you prefer a script that manages the credential acquisition process, use the command-line tool iam-mfa: https://github.com/zagaran/iam-mfa. (Disclaimer: I am the primary author of this tool.)

0

In the meantime AWS itself has provided a tutorial on how to force Users to use a MFA device while still enabling them to manage a MFA device on their own. This is quite similar to the updated answer from Steffen, but differs in the details.

It works by

  1. Creating a IAM Policy based on this official AWS template which basically forbids everything except IAM operations without an active MFA Login
  2. Assign the Policy to you relevant IAM users – or better – IAM Groups.
  3. After you created IAM users and passed them their initial credentials, the users will receive a You are not authorized to perform this operation. on all operations except on accessing the IAM security console.
  4. After registering a MFA device, logging out and then again in with their new MFA token they will be able to operate everything as expected.

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