8

I'm designing a query in SSMS 2005 which looks something like this:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT ColumnName) FROM Table WHERE ColumnName IS NOT NULL

When I run the query with COUNT() it returns the value 1. When I run it without COUNT(), SSMS reports the correct value eg 212 records.

The column in question is of datatype numeric(16, 0).

For those who might ask, the query in full is:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT O_ID) FROM vEmployers
INNER JOIN vEnrolment ON O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
WHERE E_START >= '01-AUG-2008' AND E_START < '01-AUG-2009'
AND O_ID IS NOT NULL AND O_ID IN (
    SELECT O_ID FROM vEmployers
    INNER JOIN vEnrolment ON O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
    WHERE E_Start < '01-AUG-2008' and E_Start >= '01-AUG-2007'
)

This query basically gives a repeat business figure between two 12month periods.

So I'm wondering why "COUNT(DISTINCT ColumnName)" is returning 1 when "ColumnName IS NOT NULL" has been specified?

Here is a sample of the data when SELECT TOP 10 DISTINCT ColumnName FROM... etc is run:

1346116
1346131
1346425
1346923
1349935
1350115
1350153
2594787
2821944
2879631
3
  • @GateKiller: are you absolutely positively sure that you just omit the COUNT and nothing else?
    – Quassnoi
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:13
  • Appreciate all your help so far guys :)
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:50
  • What version of SQL Server are you on? SOrry - just saw the 2005 reference above.
    – Jeff Siver
    Commented Feb 5, 2010 at 14:20

5 Answers 5

5

The use of the numeric(16, 0) made me suspect that it was data type related. Add a CAST in the COUNT clause to cast it to an INT type:

Count(Distinct Cast(O_ID as Int))
0
0

I'm guessing it's because all rows returned share the same value for O_ID. You can do a COUNT(*) or COUNT() on a key that is unique to each row to get the row count.

4
  • All returned rows are unique because of the DISTINCT clause, proven by doing the query with COUNT().
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 13:58
  • Can you provide a short excerpt of the results without the count, just showing a few O_ID?
    – Turnkey
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:03
  • Well, COUNT(DISTINCT ...) will of course count unique non-NULL values, and that's just it. Don't do distinct, count(*) or count something that is unique across all your rows, WITHOUT a DISTINCT clause.
    – Håvard S
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:06
  • Your right about how COUNT(DISTINCT ...) works and the result should be the same as the row count without the COUNT() function...
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:35
0

Could you please run these queries:

SELECT  COUNT(DISTINCT O_ID)
FROM    vEmployers
INNER JOIN
        vEnrolment
ON      O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
WHERE   E_START >= '01-AUG-2008' AND
        E_START < '01-AUG-2009'
        AND O_ID IN
        (
        SELECT  O_ID
        FROM    vEmployers
        INNER JOIN
                vEnrolment
        ON      O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
        WHERE   E_Start < '01-AUG-2008'
                AND E_Start >= '01-AUG-2007'
        )

and

SELECT  DISTINCT TOP 5 O_ID
FROM    vEmployers
INNER JOIN
        vEnrolment
ON      O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
WHERE   E_START >= '01-AUG-2008' AND
        E_START < '01-AUG-2009'
        AND O_ID IN
        (
        SELECT  O_ID
        FROM    vEmployers
        INNER JOIN
                vEnrolment
        ON      O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
        WHERE   E_Start < '01-AUG-2008'
                AND E_Start >= '01-AUG-2007'
        )
ORDER BY
        O_ID

verbatim, without changing anything?

4
  • The first query returns one row with the value "1". The second query returns five rows of unique values.
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:32
  • @GateKiller: could you please post the structure of the tables?
    – Quassnoi
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:39
  • What information are you interested in? I'm not sure I would be allowed to post the full table schema + each table has ALOT of columns.
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:47
  • @GateKiller: Just post the relevant columns: O_ID, E_START, E_EnrolmentEmployer: their datatypes, indexes if any and which tables they belong to. Also, it would be nice to see the execution plans for each query. Just run SET SHOWPLAN_TEXT ON \n GO \n SELECT … (\n is a newline)
    – Quassnoi
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:50
0
SELECT   
  COUNT(*)  
FROM    vEmployers  
INNER JOIN vEnrolment ON O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
WHERE 
        E_START >= '01-AUG-2008' 
        AND E_START < '01-AUG-2009'
        AND O_ID IS NOT NULL AND O_ID IN (
          SELECT O_ID FROM vEmployers
          INNER JOIN vEnrolment ON O_ID = E_EnrolmentEmployer
          WHERE E_Start < '01-AUG-2008' and E_Start >= '01-AUG-2007'
        )
GROUP BY
  O_Id
-1

Remove the DISTINCT and you'll get a count on all rows.

5
  • True. But as you can see from the full query, there is a join involved so this would return duplicate ID's. And it doesn't answer the question of why COUNT() is returning 1 when it shouldn't.
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:01
  • Yes, that is puzzling, thanks for posting the additional info. Did you run the exact same query to get the excerpt, just removing the count?
    – Turnkey
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:08
  • Yeah, the excerpt is the exact same query without using the COUNT() function. Very puzzling indeed!
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:33
  • I wonder if this could be data type related. I wonder if you could add a CAST in the COUNT clause to cast it to an INT type to see if that changes anything?
    – Turnkey
    Commented Feb 3, 2010 at 14:56
  • That totally worked "Count(Distinct Cast(O_ID as Int))" :D. Please can you submit that as an answer, I have some rep points for you.
    – GateKiller
    Commented Feb 5, 2010 at 10:26

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