82

I have a huge amount of PHP objects for a neural network for which I have to iterate over and perform some maths on. I was wondering if I would be better off using an associative array over instances of classes?

I am dealing with around 3640 objects and iterating around 500 times (at best) on top of that so any micro-optimization helps a great deal. Would it inevitably be quicker to do $object['value'] than $object->value?

Edit: So they are both the same. But I guess there would be a little overhead for the constructor? Either way I don't think I want to trade in my beautiful classes for dirty arrays :P

62

Based in the code of Quazzle, i ran the next code (5.4.16 windows 64bits):

<?php
class SomeClass {
    public $aaa;
    public $bbb;
    public $ccc;
    }

function p($i) {
  echo '<pre>';
  print_r($i);
  echo '</pre>';
}


$t0 = microtime(true);
$arraysOf=array();
$inicio=memory_get_usage(); 
for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {
    $z = array();
    for ($j=0; $j<1000; $j++) {
        $z['aaa'] = 'aaa';
        $z['bbb'] = 'bbb';
        $z['ccc'] = $z['aaa'].$z['bbb'];            
    }
    $arraysOf[]=$z;
}
$fin=memory_get_usage();    
echo '<p>arrays: '.(microtime(true) - $t0)."</p>";
echo '<p>memory: '.($fin-$inicio)."</p>";
p($z);

$t0 = microtime(true);
$arraysOf=array();
$inicio=memory_get_usage(); 
for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {
    $z = new SomeClass();
    for ($j=0; $j<1000; $j++) {
        $z->aaa = 'aaa';
        $z->bbb = 'bbb';
        $z->ccc = $z->aaa.$z->bbb;          
    }
    $arraysOf[]=$z;
}
$fin=memory_get_usage();    
echo '<p>arrays: '.(microtime(true) - $t0)."</p>";
echo '<p>memory: '.($fin-$inicio)."</p>";
p($z);

$t0 = microtime(true);
$arraysOf=array();
$inicio=memory_get_usage(); 
for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {
    $z = new stdClass();
    for ($j=0; $j<1000; $j++) {
        $z->aaa = 'aaa';
        $z->bbb = 'bbb';
        $z->ccc = $z->aaa.$z->bbb;          
    }
    $arraysOf[]=$z;
}
$fin=memory_get_usage();    
echo '<p>arrays: '.(microtime(true) - $t0)."</p>";
echo '<p>memory: '.($fin-$inicio)."</p>";
p($z);  
?>

And i obtained the next result:

arrays: 1.8451430797577

memory: 460416

Array
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

arrays: 1.8294548988342

memory: 275696

SomeClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

arrays: 2.2577090263367

memory: 483648

stdClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

Conclusion for php 5.4

  1. Class is fasts than Arrays (but marginally).
  2. stdClass is evil.
  3. Class uses less memory than Arrays. (about 30-40% less!!)

ps: as a note, if the class is defined but the members then, the use of this class is slower. It also uses more memory. Apparently the secret is to define the members

Update

I updated from php 5.4 to php 5.5 (5.5.12 x86 windows).

arrays: 1.6465699672699

memory: 460400

Array
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

arrays: 1.8687851428986

memory: 363704

SplFixedArray Object
(
    [0] => aaa
    [1] => bbb
    [2] => aaabbb
)

arrays: 1.8554251194

memory: 275568

SomeClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

arrays: 2.0101680755615

memory: 483656

stdClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

Conclusion for php 5.5

  1. For arrays, PHP 5.5 is faster than PHP 5.4, for object it is pretty much the same
  2. Class is slower than Arrays thanks to the optimization of PHP 5.5 and arrays.
  3. stdClass is evil.
  4. Class still uses less memory than Arrays. (about 30-40% less!!).
  5. SplFixedArray is similar to use a Class but it uses more memory.
  • A well done to you good sir. Would be interesting to expand this out to nested arrays, etc. Interesting sites for other PHP performance: phpbench.com php-benchmark-script.com but I like that you used memory as well. – Heath N Mar 20 '15 at 10:55
  • 2
    With PHP7 the difference between arrays and objects became more significant. You script shows a difference of 30% runtime and 60% memory. Thats just my machine, but as a rule of thumb: Don't use arrays as structs. Use objects instead :) – KingCrunch Jan 18 '16 at 21:57
  • Are objects different than classes in this case? – Matt G Apr 20 '17 at 21:59
9

I used this code for "profiling" (1000 instances, 1000.000 reads/writes):

function p($i) {
  echo '<pre>';
  print_r($i);
  echo '</pre>';
}


$t0 = microtime(true);
for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {
    $z = array();
    for ($j=0; $j<1000; $j++) {
        $z['aaa'] = 'aaa';
        $z['bbb'] = 'bbb';
        $z['ccc'] = $z['aaa'].$z['bbb'];
    }
}
echo '<p>arrays: '.(microtime(true) - $t0);
p($z);

$t0 = microtime(true);
for ($i=0; $i<1000; $i++) {
    $z = (object) null;
    for ($j=0; $j<1000; $j++) {
        $z->aaa = 'aaa';
        $z->bbb = 'bbb';
        $z->ccc = $z->aaa.$z->bbb;
    }
}
echo '<p>obj: '.(microtime(true) - $t0);
p($z);

echo '<p> phpversion '.phpversion();

It outputs in my LINUX hosting this stuff:

arrays: 1.1085488796234

Array
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)
obj: 1.2824709415436

stdClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)
phpversion 5.2.17

so in a conclusion: objects are slower even on PHP 5.2. Don't use objects unless you really need their oop features.

  • 7
    from user levans stackoverflow.com/users/1473035/levans: I ran this with 5.3.8 and objects were slower, 0.51839280128479 for arrays vs 0.85355806350708 for objects. I also ran it on 5.4.13 and got the opposite results, likely due to the class optimizations done in 5.4, 0.6256799697876 for arrays vs 0.43650078773499. Thus it looks like the tables have turned and objects are now the way to go. – Jean-Bernard Pellerin Apr 24 '13 at 19:12
  • 1
    Good answer, i just tested on XAMPP(Apache) and got the results below: arrays: 0.5174868106842 Array ( [aaa] => aaa [bbb] => bbb [ccc] => aaabbb ) obj: 0.72189617156982 stdClass Object ( [aaa] => aaa [bbb] => bbb [ccc] => aaabbb ) phpversion 5.4.19 – ilhnctn Oct 13 '13 at 11:20
  • 1
    I also ran on 5.4.13, but got the opposite of Jean-Bernard Pellerin: Arrays: 0.5020840167999 Objects: 1.0378720760345 So I wouldn't commit to objects just yet. – simontemplar Oct 31 '13 at 5:42
  • I did some changes in the code and Class is fast than Arrays for php 5.4 (5.4.16 32bits Windows). I put a new answer that explains the reason. – magallanes Jun 2 '14 at 17:04
  • PHP 5.5.11 Results: Arrays: 0.17430, Objects: 0.24183 – Lex Mar 20 '16 at 5:40
3

I use magallanes' code under php 7.0.9 :

arrays: 0.19802498817444

memory: 324672

Array
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)
arrays: 0.18602299690247

memory: 132376

SomeClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)
arrays: 0.1950249671936

memory: 348296

stdClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

And user php 7.1.3:

arrays: 0.59932994842529
memory: 444920
Array
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

arrays: 0.72895789146423
memory: 164512

SomeClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)

arrays: 0.61777496337891
memory: 484416
stdClass Object
(
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)                      
  • 1
    And don't forget stdClass can use real string numeric key. ['1'=>1] will be stored as [1=>1], but we can use $a=new stdClass(); $a->{1} = 1; $b=(array)$a; get real ['1'=>1]. – chariothy Jun 23 '17 at 9:00
  • 1
    So, in conclusion.. Arrays are 18% faster but consume 2.7x as much memory. – jchook Jul 28 '18 at 17:33
2

You haven't shown us the code for how $object->value works, as it could be that backend it is an array in which case theoretically using an array would be faster as it involves one less function call. The cost of doing the lookup will probably be huge compared to the function call. If it is a variable, there is going to be very little diffrence as objects and arrays in PHP have a very similar implementation.

If you are looking at optimizations, you will need to profile to check where the majority of the time is being used. I suspect that changing objects to arrays will make no major difference.

  • I assumed that value would be a public variable, therefore defenitely O(1) while the hash-lookup might not be. – Filip Ekberg Feb 3 '10 at 15:35
2

I see this is kind of an old post so I thought I'll update it. here are my codes and stats, done on Zend CE 5.3.21 I tried to test the whole thing, storing info and pulling it back.

V1 : takes 0.83 sec

for ($i=1; $i<1000000; $i++) {
  $a = get_one();
  $b = $a[0];
  $b = $a[1];
}

function get_one() {
  return array(1,1);
}

V2 : takes 3.05 sec

for ($i=1; $i<1000000; $i++) {
  $a = get_one();
  $b = $a->v;
  $b = $a->k;
}

function get_one() {
  $ret = new test();
  $ret->v = 1;
  $reb->k = 1;
  return $ret;
}

class test {
  public $v;
  public $k;
}

V3 : takes 1.98 sec (note that the constructor improves the performance)

for ($i=1; $i<1000000; $i++) {
  $a = get_one();
  $b = $a->v;
  $b = $a->k;
}

function get_one() {
  return new test(1,1);
}

class test {
  public $v;
  public $k;
  public function __construct($v, $k) {
    $this->v = $v;
    $this->k = $k;
  }
}
1

You can always check the PHP-source code for micro-performance-features like that.

But at a first glance, no doing ['value'] will not be faster because PHP needs to do a Lookup on where to find ['value'] even thougn a hashtable lookup should be O(1), that's not guaranteed. There's more overhead when you use Text-index.

If the object only contains 1 variables that you need to access which is value, there's more overhead in using an object.

  • And where do you think properties are looked up? They're in a hash table, too... (though this is only more or less true in trunk). – Artefacto Aug 7 '10 at 21:47
1

magallanes' script @ PHP 7.3.5

  • SomeClass Object is fastest and lightest.
  • Array 1.32x speed. 2.70x memory.
  • stdClass Object 1.65x speed. 2.94x memory.

Raw output:

arrays: 0.064794063568115
memory: 444920
Array (
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)
arrays: 0.048975944519043
memory: 164512
SomeClass Object (
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)
arrays: 0.081161022186279
memory: 484416
stdClass Object (
    [aaa] => aaa
    [bbb] => bbb
    [ccc] => aaabbb
)
0

If Arrays and Classs are the same performance, I think use objects of predefined classes for storing/passing business data would make our program more logic and the code more readability.

Today, with modern ide like Eclipse, Netbean ... it's very convenient to know what info an objects (of predefined class) is carrying but arrays are not so

Eg: With array

function registerCourse(array $student) {
    // Right here I don't know how a $student look like unless doing a print_r() or var_dump()
 ....
}

With object

class Studen {
    private $_name, $_age;
    public function getAge() {}
    public function getName() {}
    ..
}

function registerCourse(Studen $student) {
    // Right here I just Ctrl+Space $student or click "Student" and I know I can get name or age from it
    ...
}
  • This contradicts the other proven answers and has no proof. So this is more an ideological belief, than an actual answer. – scones Aug 10 '18 at 15:17

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