I'm pretty fresh to Go and already loving it. I'm building a REST API using Gorilla's mux as the router.

I'm wondering how I can protect specific routes with simple HTTP Basic Auth. I don't have a need to read the credentials from a file or any external source, I really just want to protect selected routes by a hard coded HTTP Basic Auth username and password.

What is the idiomatic way of doing so in Go? Does Gorilla offer anything to make it more easy? If you could provide a few lines of code, that would be just wonderful.

Combining a couple of answers into an easy copy/paste:

// BasicAuth wraps a handler requiring HTTP basic auth for it using the given
// username and password and the specified realm, which shouldn't contain quotes.
//
// Most web browser display a dialog with something like:
//
//    The website says: "<realm>"
//
// Which is really stupid so you may want to set the realm to a message rather than
// an actual realm.
func BasicAuth(handler http.HandlerFunc, username, password, realm string) http.HandlerFunc {

    return func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {

        user, pass, ok := r.BasicAuth()

        if !ok || subtle.ConstantTimeCompare([]byte(user), []byte(username)) != 1 || subtle.ConstantTimeCompare([]byte(pass), []byte(password)) != 1 {
            w.Header().Set("WWW-Authenticate", `Basic realm="`+realm+`"`)
            w.WriteHeader(401)
            w.Write([]byte("Unauthorised.\n"))
            return
        }

        handler(w, r)
    }
}

...

http.HandleFunc("/", BasicAuth(handleIndex, "admin", "123456", "Please enter your username and password for this site"))

Note that subtle.ConstantTimeCompare() still depends on the length, so it is probably possible for attackers to work out the length of the username and password if you do it like this. To get around that you could hash them or add a fixed delay.

  • This is the only correct answer to the question of idiom, and the only sensibly secure answer. – Matt Jan 4 '17 at 0:16
  • What added benefits are there for using ConstantTimeCompare if the username/password check is done on the server side? I'm genuinely curious because I use a similar method to this one but with basic comparisons. I haven't had any problems with it. – lee8oi Mar 30 '17 at 22:37
  • 3
    If you don't use ConstantTimeCompare() people could work out how long the operation took. From that they can work out how much of the password matches and try all letters until the first letter of the password matches, then the second and so on. If you hash the passwords before comparison (which you really should - passwords shouldn't be stored in plain text) then it isn't so much of an issue but is probably still a good idea anyway. You'll never notice any issues if you don't do it but it is a potential security vulnerability. – Timmmm Mar 31 '17 at 9:44
  • Makes sense. I appreciate the insight. Thanks. – lee8oi Mar 31 '17 at 14:18

Check req.BasicAuth() https://golang.org/pkg/net/http/#Request.BasicAuth

You can check this in your handler or wrap your handler like so:

func auth(fn http.HandlerFunc) http.HandlerFunc {
  return func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    user, pass, _ := r.BasicAuth()
    if !check(user, pass) {
       http.Error(w, "Unauthorized.", 401)
       return
    }
    fn(w, r)
  }
}

Where

check(u, p string) bool 

is a function you will have to write yourself based on how you are storing credentials. Now you can use:

auth(originalHandler)

Wherever you were passing originalHandler before.

[edit: It's worth adding that your check function should be resistant to side channel attacks like timing attacks. Also stored passwords should be hashed with a cryptographically random salt. Also you should probably use OAuth instead and let an established identity provider worry about password security for you.]

  • 7
    http.Error(w, "Unauthorized.", http.StatusUnauthorized) – Matt Williamson Nov 18 '16 at 18:36
  • 1
    this method is simple and works beautifully – Tyguy7 Mar 17 '17 at 19:28
  • 1
    I second Matt Williamson's suggestion to use the more semantic statuscode constant. Also add w.Header().Set("WWW-Authenticate", "Basic realm=\"MY REALM\"") before http.Error() to make the browser prompt for the password. – joonas.fi Nov 12 '17 at 9:26

As of 2016, I would suggest to use this answer. In any case, wrap your HTTP basic auth in SSL to avoid sending username and password as plain text.


Just wrap your handler in another handler and use issue WWW-Authorization header on the incoming request.

Example (full version):

func checkAuth(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) bool {
    s := strings.SplitN(r.Header.Get("Authorization"), " ", 2)
    if len(s) != 2 { return false }

    b, err := base64.StdEncoding.DecodeString(s[1])
    if err != nil { return false }

    pair := strings.SplitN(string(b), ":", 2)
    if len(pair) != 2 { return false }

    return pair[0] == "user" && pair[1] == "pass"
}

yourRouter.HandleFunc("/", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    if checkAuth(w, r) {
        yourOriginalHandler.ServeHTTP(w, r)
        return
    }

    w.Header().Set("WWW-Authenticate", `Basic realm="MY REALM"`)
    w.WriteHeader(401)
    w.Write([]byte("401 Unauthorized\n"))
})

Unfortunately, the std. library only offers client basic auth and therefore you have to do it yourself or use a library, for example this one.

  • 1
    Based on @Romoku's comment and @nemo's checkAuth function, I've made a more complete example that allows you to wrap any http.HandlerFunc with a piece of middleware that implements HTTP Basic Auth. Take a look here: gist.github.com/elithrar/9146306 – elithrar Feb 22 '14 at 0:08
  • need : import ( "encoding/base64" "strings") – temple Aug 21 '16 at 1:45
  • Your example is vulnerable to timings attacks. Copypasters should use crypto/subtle when verifying username and password. – Ammar Bandukwala May 7 '17 at 21:48

The net/http request type has helper functions for doing this (tested on go 1.7). A simpler version of nemo's answer would look like such:

func basicAuthHandler(user, pass, realm string, next http.HandlerFunc) http.HandlerFunc {
    return func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
        if checkBasicAuth(r, user, pass) {
            next(w, r)
            return
        }

        w.Header().Set("WWW-Authenticate", fmt.Sprintf(`Basic realm="%s"`, realm))
        w.WriteHeader(401)
        w.Write([]byte("401 Unauthorized\n"))
    }
}

func checkBasicAuth(r *http.Request, user, pass string) bool {
    u, p, ok := r.BasicAuth()
    if !ok {
        return false
    }
    return u == user && p == pass
}

then simply create your handler with business logic and pass it as the next argument in basicAuthHandler to create a new "wrapped" handlerFunc.

  • This is also the cleanest (most readable) least pretentious version of the code. – MrMesees Oct 27 '17 at 21:45

go-http-auth will do it for you. It will fit right in if you're using net/http.

  • Thanks so much! Could you provide very basic example which illustrates this? – Ralf Feb 22 '14 at 16:21
  • 1
    I don't recommend this package, the documentation is very incomplete – Tyguy7 Mar 17 '17 at 19:24

I realize I'm late to the party here. I just happened to be revisiting HTTP Basic Authentication. After going through all the answers here I actually settled on a variation of Timmmm's solution. I even took it the step farther and added the hashing as per his suggestion to improve security. Figured I might as well share my variation of the code.

userhash := hasher("admin")
passhash := hasher("$CrazyUnforgettablePassword?")
realm := "Please enter username and password"

http.HandleFunc("/", authHandler(indexHandler, userhash, passhash, realm))

// Above code should obviously be in main() along with the http listener, etc.

// hasher uses package "crypto/sha256"
func hasher(s string) []byte {
    val := sha256.Sum256([]byte(s))
    return val[:]
}

func authHandler(handler http.HandlerFunc, userhash, passhash []byte, realm string) http.HandlerFunc {
    return func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
        user, pass, ok := r.BasicAuth()
        if !ok || subtle.ConstantTimeCompare(hasher(user),
            userhash) != 1 || subtle.ConstantTimeCompare(hasher(pass), passhash) != 1 {
            w.Header().Set("WWW-Authenticate", `Basic realm="`+realm+`"`)
            http.Error(w, "Unauthorized.", http.StatusUnauthorized)
            return
        }
        handler(w, r)
    }
}
  • 1
    Please don't use MD5 for password hashing. Use something like PBKDF2. – nemo Apr 4 '17 at 13:07
  • pbkdf2 isn't part of the standard library. Any other suggestions? – lee8oi Apr 4 '17 at 18:25
  • 1
    the x repository for PBKDF2 which I linked is official but 'experimental', meaning that it is not yet part of the standard library because the API might change. It is still possible to use and almost certainly better than using MD5. An alternative would be to use blowfish or SHA256 with a randomly generated salt. – nemo Apr 4 '17 at 18:49
  • 1
    Salting is not a process that requires special functionality, it is the process of adding additional bytes to the bytes you want to hash. There are certain things you need to watch out for. For example, for Merkle-Damgård (MD) hash functions you must not append the salt bytes since then you could precompute all MD rounds until the last one and compute the salt independently. More info here. In essence, if you are not sure, use something that already does what you want (bcrypt, PBKDF2). – nemo Apr 4 '17 at 19:20
  • 1
    I think you are assuming the hackers would be able to access the hashed data. This hashing is happening on the server side out of view. The general idea of using hashing, according to Timmmm, was to accompany the subtle time compare to help thwart the ability to figure out how much of the password matches based on how long the operation took. I think we've accomplished that already. So I'm content with the answer as it stands. Especially considering it's probably the most secure answer in this thread. Even yours doesn't use any hashing or encryption. – lee8oi Apr 4 '17 at 19:34

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