4

Can this problem be done using only one dp array? It is the zigzag problem from topcoder (http://community.topcoder.com/stat?c=problem_statement&pm=1259&rd=4493) A sequence of numbers is called a zig-zag sequence if the differences between successive numbers strictly alternate between positive and negative. The first difference (if one exists) may be either positive or negative. A sequence with fewer than two elements is trivially a zig-zag sequence.

For example, 1,7,4,9,2,5 is a zig-zag sequence because the differences (6,-3,5,-7,3) are alternately positive and negative. In contrast, 1,4,7,2,5 and 1,7,4,5,5 are not zig-zag sequences, the first because its first two differences are positive and the second because its last difference is zero.

Given a sequence of integers, sequence, return the length of the longest subsequence of sequence that is a zig-zag sequence. A subsequence is obtained by deleting some number of elements (possibly zero) from the original sequence, leaving the remaining elements in their original order.

  • What is the desired running time? – Nikunj Banka Feb 21 '14 at 16:13
  • 1
    what exactly do you want? If you want just one array just use an array of length 2n with 0-n being zag and n-2n being zig? – sukunrt Feb 21 '14 at 18:04
0

For reference: the DP with two arrays uses an array A[1..n] where A[i] is the maximum length of a zig-zag sequence ending with a zig on element i, and an array B[1..n] where B[i] is the maximum length of a zig-zag sequence ending with a zag on element i. For i from 1 to n, this DP uses the previous entries of the A array to compute the B[i], and the previous entries of the B array to compute A[i]. At the cost of an extra loop, it would be possible to recreate the B entries on demand and thus use only the A array. I'm not sure if this solves your problem, though.

(Also, since the input arrays are so short, there are any number of encoding tricks not worth mentioning.)

0

Here's an attempt, I'm returning the indices from where you have zigzag. In your 2nd input (1,4,7,2,5), it returns indices of 5 and 4 since it's a zigzag from 4,7,2,5.

You can figure out if the whole array is zigzag based on the result.

 public class LongestZigZag
    {
        private readonly int[] _input;

        public LongestZigZag(int[] input)
        {
            _input = input;
        }

        public Tuple<int,int> Sequence()
        {
            var indices = new Tuple<int, int>(int.MinValue, int.MinValue);

            if (_input.Length <= 2) return indices;

            for (int i = 2; i < _input.Length; i++)
            {
                var firstDiff = _input[i - 1] - _input[i - 2];
                var secondDiff = _input[i] - _input[i - 1];

                if ((firstDiff > 0 && secondDiff < 0) || (firstDiff < 0 && secondDiff > 0))
                {
                    var index1 = indices.Item1;
                    if (index1 == int.MinValue)
                    {
                        index1 = i - 2;
                    }

                    indices = new Tuple<int, int>(index1, i);
                }
                else
                {
                    indices = new Tuple<int, int>(int.MinValue, int.MinValue); 
                }
            }

            return indices;
        }
    }
0

Dynamic Programming takes O(n2) time to run a program. I have designed a code which is of Linear Time Complexity O(n). With one go in the array, it gives the length of Largest possible sequence. I have tested for many test cases provided by different sites for the problem and have got positive results.

Here is my C implementation of code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
int i,j;
int n;
int count=0;
int flag=0;
scanf(" %d",&n);
int *a;
a = (int*)malloc(n*sizeof(a));

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
{
    scanf(" %d",&a[i]);  //1,7,5,10,13,15,10,5,16,8
}   
i=0; 
if(a[0] < a[1])
{
    count++;
    while(a[i] <= a[i+1] && i<n-1)
    i++;

    if(i==n-1 && a[i-1]<a[i])
    {
        count++;
        i++;
    }    
}  
  while(i<n-1)
  {   count++;
      while(a[i] >= a[i+1] && i<n-1) 
      {
        i++;  
      }
      if(i==n-1 && a[i-1]>a[i])
      {
          count++; 
          break;
      }      
      if(i<n-1)
      count++;
      while(a[i] <= a[i+1] && i<n-1)
      {
          i++;
      } 
      if(i==n-1 && a[i-1]<a[i])
      {
          count++;
          break;
      }         
  }      

printf("%d",count);
return 0;
}     
  • Dynamic Programming takes O(n2) - no it does not. – Błażej Michalik Mar 12 '18 at 13:58
0

Every (to my knowledge on the topic, so don't take it for granted) solution which you work out with dynamic programming, comes down to representing a "solution space" (meaning every possible solution that is correct, not necessarily optimal) with a DAG (Directed Acyclic Graph).

For example, if you are looking for a longest rising subseqence, then the solution space can be represented as the following DAG:

  • Nodes are labeled with the numbers of the sequence
  • Edge e(u, v) between two nodes indicates that valueOf(u) < valueOf(v) (where valueOf(x) is the value associated with node x)

In dynamic programming, finding an optimal solution to the problem is the same thing as traversing this graph in the right way. The information provided by that graph is in some sense represented by that DP array.

In this case we have two ordering operations. If we would present both of them on one of such graphs, that graph would not be acyclic - we will require at least two graphs (one representing < relation, and one for >).

If the topological ordering requires two DAGs, the solution will require two DP arrays, or some clever way of indicating which edge in Your DAG corresponds to which ordering operation (which in my opinion needlessly complicates the problem).

Hence no, You can't do it with just one DP array. You will require at least two. At least if you want a simple solution that is approached purely by using dynamic programming.


The recursive call for this problem should look something like this (the directions of the relations might be wrong, I haven't checked it):

S - given sequence (array of integers)
P(i), Q(i) - length of the longest zigzag subsequence on elements S[0 -> i] inclusive (the longest sequence that is correct, where S[i] is the last element)

P(i) = {if i == 0 then 1
       {max(Q(j) + 1 if A[i] < A[j] for every 0 <= j < i)


Q(i) = {if i == 0 then 0  #yields 0 because we are pedantic about "is zig the first relation, or is it zag?". If we aren't, then this can be a 1.
       {max(P(j) + 1 if A[i] > A[j] for every 0 <= j < i)

This should be O(n) with the right memoization (two DP arrays). These calls return the length of the solution - the actual result can be found by storing "parent pointer" whenever a max value is found, and then traversing backwards on these pointers.

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