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I want to find a linux command that can return a part of the string. In most programming languages, it's the substr() function. Does bash have any command that can be used for this purpose. I want to be able to do something like this... substr "abcdefg" 2 3 - prints cde.


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marked as duplicate by fedorqui linux Jan 24 '17 at 9:24

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up vote 145 down vote accepted

If you are looking for a shell utility to do something like that, you can use the cut command.

To take your example, try:

echo "abcdefg" | cut -c3-5

which yields

cde

Where -cN-M tells the cut command to return columns N to M, inclusive.

  • 2
    Even though I have the "accepted" answer, I would like to point out that if you want to do a lot of sub-string extraction, using the built-in substring expansion (see dmckee's answer) is the more efficient way to go. That said, cut is easier to remember and use. – Toybuilder Nov 14 '11 at 17:44
  • what do we need to do if we want to start from 3rd char till end of the string ie: "abcdef" we need cdef then echo "abcdef" | cut -c3?" – user1731553 Apr 5 '16 at 5:46
  • cut has some useful arguments you can use. -f changes it from counting characters to counting fields, delimited by TAB by default or by any character you specify following -d. So to get your input string up until but not including the first slash (exactly what I wanted), you can do: cut -d/ -f-1, which can be read as "cut on substrings delimited by /, only return the first one". – ArtOfWarfare Sep 11 '17 at 14:31

From the bash manpage:

${parameter:offset}
${parameter:offset:length}
        Substring  Expansion.   Expands  to  up  to length characters of
        parameter starting at the character  specified  by  offset.
[...]

Or, if you are not sure of having bash, consider using cut.

  • interesting, I did not know about this. For more flexibile substring options: man cut – Evan Teran Oct 20 '08 at 18:37
  • Shell extensions are nice, but... meh. – Clinton Pierce Oct 20 '08 at 20:03
  • I mostly agree. I usually write shell scripts in vanilla /bin/sh. But I find that I have to know some bashisms to read shell scripts... – dmckee Oct 20 '08 at 20:06
  • Is there something like ${str:3:-3} to extract a substring from char 3 to last char minus -3? – becko Feb 28 '17 at 15:10
  • @becko My current bash manpage (MacOS 10.12, so the BSD lineage, I think) has considerably more than the quote above including If offset evaluates to a number less than zero, the value is used as an offset from the end of the value of parameter. Meaning that you would want ${str:-3:3}. – dmckee Feb 28 '17 at 15:12

In "pure" bash you have many tools for (sub)string manipulation, mainly, but not exclusively in parameter expansion :

${parameter//substring/replacement}
${parameter##remove_matching_prefix}
${parameter%%remove_matching_suffix}

Indexed substring expansion (special behaviours with negative offsets, and, in newer Bashes, negative lengths):

${parameter:offset}
${parameter:offset:length}
${parameter:offset:length}

And of course, the much useful expansions that operate on whether the parameter is null:

${parameter:+use this if param is NOT null}
${parameter:-use this if param is null}
${parameter:=use this and assign to param if param is null}
${parameter:?show this error if param is null}

They have more tweakable behaviours than those listed, and as I said, there are other ways to manipulate strings (a common one being $(command substitution) combined with sed or any other external filter). But, they are so easily found by typing man bash that I don't feel it merits to further extend this post.

In bash you can try this:

stringZ=abcABC123ABCabc
#       0123456789.....
#       0-based indexing.

echo ${stringZ:0:2} # prints ab

More samples in The Linux Documentation Project

expr(1) has a substr subcommand:

expr substr <string> <start-index> <length>

This may be useful if you don't have bash (perhaps embedded Linux) and you don't want the extra "echo" process you need to use cut(1).

${string:position:length}

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