4

I actually got the idea of this question when I was discussing on another question of mine (Member not zeroed, a clang++ bug?). That question is about C++11 value-initialization, but when I saw the C++03 value-initialization rule someone posted there, I am confused.

The value-initialization rule from C++03 is:

To value-initialize an object of type T means:

  • if T is a class type (clause 9) with a user-declared constructor (12.1), then the default constructor for T is called (and the initialization is ill-formed if T has no accessible default constructor);
  • if T is a non-union class type without a user-declared constructor, then every non-static data member and base-class component of T is value-initialized;
  • if T is an array type, then each element is value-initialized;
  • otherwise, the object is zero-initialized

Please look at the second bullet which defines the value-initialize process for a type without user-declared constructor. This rule doesn't mention a constructor call. As we can see from the description of other cases of value-initialize or from the description of default-initialize, if constructor should be called, it will be explicitly mentioned in the text of the standard. I know there is certain initialization form that constructor doesn't get called (e.g. {}-initialization for aggregates), but should it be the case for value-initialize of non-union class type without a user-declared constructor? The implicitly declared constructor of such a type could easily be non-trivial. For example:

class A {
public:
    virtual void f() {}
};

According to the rule in C++03, if the implicitly declared non-trivial constructor doesn't get called in the process of the value-initialization of an object of A, how does the vptr of the object get setup? (I know things related to vptr is all implementation-defined, but this doesn't change the major point I'm trying to make here.)

(Someone would argue that the absence of mentioning a constructor call in the rule doesn't mean constructor won't get called. OK. Let's say constructor will get called according to some other rule I may have overlooked, but since all members need to be value-initialized anyway, wouldn't that cause the members' constructors to be called more than once?)

Asking a question for C++03 when it's already C++11 everywhere may seem worthless. Yeah, that's a valid point. However, I think I could more or less learn something if I finally figure this out (whether I am wrong and why).

EDIT: Maybe I shouldn't have used vptr as an example. My point is, wouldn't skipping the call to a non-trivial constructor cause some potential problem for the validity of the object? After all, it's called non-trivial for a reason.

  • That standard quote doesn't preclude the compiler from inserting its own magic during initialization, and setting up the vtable is part of that magic. – Praetorian Feb 21 '14 at 17:25
  • @Praetorian: Maybe I shouldn't have used vptr as an example. My point is, wouldn't skipping the call to a non-trivial constructor cause some potential problem for the validity of the object? After all, it's called non-trivial for a reason. – goodbyeera Feb 21 '14 at 17:40
0

As far as the Standard is concerned, the constructor is not responsible for setting up the vtable. There is nothing responsible for setting up the vtable; vtables don't exist, as far as the Standard is concerned.

Rather, the vtable is a consequence of the other rules the compiler has to follow, relating to virtual function binding and such. So whether or not the constructor is called, the vtable's going to be set up somewhere, because otherwise the compiler will have trouble meeting its other obligations. That doesn't contradict the value-initialization rule; rather, it adds nuance to the practicalities of implementing the rule.

  • Maybe I shouldn't have used vptr as an example. My point is, wouldn't skipping the call to a non-trivial constructor cause some potential problem? After all, it's called non-trivial for a reason. – goodbyeera Feb 21 '14 at 17:34
  • No, because the things which a non-trivial default constructor does are the same things which value-initialization does. – Sneftel Feb 21 '14 at 17:43
  • Quote from standard: "A constructor is trivial if it is an implicitly-declared default constructor and if: - its class has no virtual functions (10.3) and no virtual base classes (10.1), and ...". Though adding a virtual function will make an implicitly-declared default constructor change from trivial to non-trivial, it still does exactly the same thing (nothing more, nothing less), so skipping it doesn't hurt at all. Am I understanding correctly? – goodbyeera Feb 21 '14 at 18:00
  • Yeah. The trivial/non-trivial definition does exist to address issues relating to vtable setup/teardown, but this particular exception to the special treatment of non-trivial constructors doesn't compromise compilers' ability to do their vtable duties. – Sneftel Feb 21 '14 at 18:11
0

When a class X has no user-provided constructor, its default constructor does exactly what a constructor of the form X::X() {} would (C++03[class.ctor]§6). And as far as the standard is concerned, this is defined to perform default initialisation of all members and base class subobjects, and nothing else. So "calling the generated default constructor" is identical to "default-initialising all data members and base class subobjects."

So this actually does "less" than the value initialisation you quoted - as that value initialisation value-initialises all data members and base class subobjects. So it does all the constructor does, and more.

As far as implementation-specific things (like the vtable pointer) go, these are outside of the scope of the standard. It is a compiler's responsibility to make sure all of its implementation-specific mechanisms work regardless of constructor calls mandated by the standard.

  • The bolded part says without an initializer, but value-initialize does have an initializer: (). As for vptr, maybe I shouldn't have used vptr as an example. My point is, wouldn't skipping the call to a non-trivial constructor cause some potential problem for the validity of the object? After all, it's called non-trivial for a reason. – goodbyeera Feb 21 '14 at 17:39
  • @goodbyeera Torn down and rewritten from scratch. – Angew Feb 21 '14 at 17:47
  • Quote from standard: "A constructor is trivial if it is an implicitly-declared default constructor and if: - its class has no virtual functions (10.3) and no virtual base classes (10.1), and ...". Though adding a virtual function will make an implicitly-declared default constructor change from trivial to non-trivial, it still does exactly the same thing, so skipping it doesn't hurt at all. Am I understanding correctly? – goodbyeera Feb 21 '14 at 17:59
  • @goodbyeera Yes, that's how I interpret it. – Angew Feb 21 '14 at 18:00

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