6

Working through some programming interview challenges I found online, I had to write an algorithm to reverse a const char * and return a pointer to a new char *. I think I have it, but to make it work properly I had to do some wonky stuff - basically having to account for the null-terminating character myself. Somehow I feel this is wrong, but I'm stumped, and I was wondering if someone could help me out:

char * reverse(const char * str)
{
  int length = strlen(str);
  char * reversed_string = new char[length+1];

  for(int i = 0; i < length; ++i)
  {
    reversed_string[i] = str[(length-1) - i];
  }
  //need to null terminate the string
  reversed_string[length] = '\0';

  return reversed_string;

}

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{

  char * rev_str = reverse("Testing");

  cout << "Your string reversed is this: " << rev_str << endl;

  delete rev_str;
  rev_str = 0;

  return 0;
}
  • You should be using delete[], not plain delete. – Adam Rosenfield Oct 20 '08 at 18:51
  • 1
    Don't forget to check for a NULL string. – Michael McCarty Oct 20 '08 at 18:51
  • 1
    thanks adam and michael, good tips! – Keith Oct 20 '08 at 18:56
  • 1
    My C++ is rusty, but shouldn't it be delete[] rev_str instead of delete rev_str? – Rontologist Oct 20 '08 at 19:59
  • Nice, I actually had this question during an interview last week. – smaclell Oct 20 '08 at 20:28

20 Answers 20

16

std::reverse from <algorithm> works for strings and char arrays:

string str = "Hello";
char chx[] = "Hello";

reverse(str.begin(), str.end());
reverse(chx, chx + strlen(chx));

cout << str << endl;
cout << chx << endl;

/EDIT: This, of course, modifies the original string. But STL to the rescue. The following creates a new reversed string. Unfortunately (?), this doesn't work directly on C char arrays without creating an additional (implicit) copy:

string reverse_string(string const& old) {
    return string(old.rbegin(), old.rend());
}

cout << reverse_string("Hello") << endl;
  • Yes. Prefer a library when available. – dmckee Oct 20 '08 at 18:55
  • Modifying the original string is a very bad idea when the original string is a pointer to a string literal. An array would be better. – bk1e Oct 21 '08 at 4:46
  • b1ke: ouch. Should test more. ;-) – Konrad Rudolph Oct 21 '08 at 8:03
  • Is using a library a good answer to a programming interview challenge if the task is to "write an algorithm"? – akaihola Feb 10 '09 at 9:18
  • akaihola: that depends on the interview situation. But in my experience knowledge in the C++ standard library is abysmal, even in programmers who proclaim to be proficient C++ programmers. Reversing a string (even efficiently) is a trivial problem. Knowing the right C++stdlib function is important. – Konrad Rudolph Feb 10 '09 at 10:47
14

I had this question once. That's the first answer that comes to mind, but the follow-up is, "now do it without allocating any memory."

int length = strlen(string);
for(int i = 0; i < length/2; i++) {
  char c = string[i];
  string[i] = string[length - i];
  string[length - i] = c;
}

EDIT: Some folks have expressed disdain for not using pointers. This is a tiny bit more readable, though not completely optimal. Others have entered the pointer solution, so I won't repeat it here.

One commenter challenged that it should be doable without a (stack based) holding cell for the swap. The mechanism for doing that is bitwise XOR. Replace the inside of the loop with

string[i] = string[i] ^ string[length - i];
string[length - i] = string[i] ^ string[length - i];
string[i] = string[i] ^ string[length - i];

But in general, modern compilers can optimize out the local variable of a naive swap. For details, See Wikipedia

  • Because JDS starts with const char*, allocation (or breaking constant correctness by casting) is required... – dmckee Oct 20 '08 at 18:43
  • Sure, but the implication of the follow-up question is that you're going to be modifying the string in-place, which implies getting rid of const. – nsayer Oct 20 '08 at 18:44
  • Don't forget to check for a null string – Michael McCarty Oct 20 '08 at 18:48
  • Now do it without using a temporary holding variable. – Giao Oct 20 '08 at 19:51
  • Slightly faster, with pointer arithmetic: int top = strlen(string)-1; char c; for( ; top!=0; top--, string++) { c = string[0]; string[0] = string[top]; string[top] = c; } – Joe Pineda Oct 20 '08 at 21:45
7
if( string[0] )
{
    char *end = string + strlen(string)-1;
    while( start < end )
    {
        char temp = *string;
        *string++ = *end;
        *end-- = temp;
    }
}
  • 1
    You probably mean *end--, not *end++. – nsayer Oct 20 '08 at 18:48
  • Even if the *end++ if fixed to be *end-- the line that initializes `end results in undefined behavior if strlen() returns 0. – Michael Burr Oct 20 '08 at 18:53
  • (facepalm) Oops. @Mike B: Undefined but completely reliable in the real world (like much production C) – Menkboy Oct 20 '08 at 19:01
  • Yeah - I wouldn't have a heart attack if I saw it in a code review, but I'd mention it and would expect it to be fixed as a result of it being brought up in a code review. – Michael Burr Oct 20 '08 at 19:12
  • Aye, fair point, fixed. – Menkboy Oct 20 '08 at 19:59
3

Your code is straight forward and unsurprising. A few things:

  1. Use size_t instead of int for your loop index
  2. While your compiler is most likely smart enough to figure out that (length -1) is invariant, it's probably not smart enough to figure out that (length-1)-i is best replaced by a different loop variable that is decremented in each pass
  3. I'd use pointers instead of array syntax - it will look cleaner to me to have *dst-- = *src++; in the loop.

In other words:

char *dst = reversed_string + length;
*dst-- = '\0';
while (*src) {
   *dst-- = *src++;
}
3

Uh? No one did it with pointers?

char *reverse(const char *s) {
    size_t n = strlen(s);
    char *dest = new char[n + 1];
    char *d = (dest + n - 1);

    dest[n] = 0;
    while (*s) {
        *d-- = *s++
    }

    return dest;
}

Hopefully years of Java haven't ruined my C ;-)

Edit: replaced all those strlen calls with an extra var. What does strlen return these days? (Thanks plinth).

  • Careful - you called strlen() on s three times when one would have done - that means you traverse the string 4x. – plinth Oct 20 '08 at 20:01
3

I know this is highly unportable but x86 assembler instruction bswap lets you swap four bytes by means of just one instruction which can be a good path to boost the code.

This is an example of how to get it working with GCC.

/* 
 * reverse.c
 *
 * $20081020 23:33 fernando DOT miguelez AT gmail DOT com$
 */

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#define MAX_CHARS 10 * 1024 * 1024

/*
 * Borrowed from http://coding.derkeiler.com/Archive/Assembler/comp.lang.asm.x86/2007-03/msg00004.html
 * GNU Compiler syntax
 */
inline uint32_t bswap(uint32_t val)
{
    __asm__("bswap %0" : "=r" (val) : "0" (val));
    return val;
}

char * reverseAsm(const char * str)
{
    int i;
    int length = strlen(str);
    int dwordLength = length/4;

    if(length % 4 != 0)
    {
        printf("Error: Input string length must be multiple of 4: %d\n", length);       
        return NULL;
    }

    char * reversed_string = (char *) malloc(length+1);
    for(i = 0; i < dwordLength; i++)
    {
        *(((uint32_t *) reversed_string) + dwordLength - i - 1) = bswap(*(((uint32_t *) str) + i));
    }

    reversed_string[length] = '\0';

    return reversed_string;
}

char * reverse(const char * str)
{
    int i;
    int length = strlen(str);
    char * reversed_string = (char *) malloc(length+1);

    for(i = 0; i < length; ++i)
    {
        reversed_string[i] = str[(length-1) - i];
    }

        //need to null terminate the string

    reversed_string[length] = '\0';

    return reversed_string;
}

int main(void)
{
    int i;
    char *reversed_str, *reversed_str2;
    clock_t start, total;
    char *str = (char *) malloc(MAX_CHARS+1);

    str[MAX_CHARS] = '\0';

    srand(time(0));

    for(i = 0; i < MAX_CHARS; i++)
    {
        str[i] = 'A' + rand() % 26;     
    }

    start = clock();
    reversed_str = reverse(str);
    total = clock() - start;
    if(reversed_str != NULL)
    {
        printf("Total clock ticks to reverse %d chars with pure C method: %d\n", MAX_CHARS, total); 
        free(reversed_str);
    }
    start = clock();
    reversed_str2 = reverseAsm(str);
    total = clock() - start;
    if(reversed_str2 != NULL)
    {
        printf("Total clock ticks to reverse %d chars with ASM+C method: %d\n", MAX_CHARS, total); 
        free(reversed_str2);
    }

    free(str);

    return 0;
}

The results on my old computer under Cygwin:

fer@fernando /cygdrive/c/tmp$ ./reverse.exe
Total clock ticks to reverse 10485760 chars with pure C method: 221
Total clock ticks to reverse 10485760 chars with ASM+C method: 140
2

@Konrad Rudolph: (sorry I don't have the "experience" to post a comment)

I want to point out that the STL supplies a reverse_copy() algorithm, similar to reverse(). You need not introduce a temporary the way you did, just allocate a new char * of the right size.

  • About reverse_copy: true. Don't see any advantage, though. About the temp copy: this one is necessary if I want to return a string. If I allocate a char array and return it, the caller has to clear up this memory – messy. Better stick with C++ strings. – Konrad Rudolph Oct 21 '08 at 8:07
  • The question posted requested a char * to be returned, I was just trying to point out that it can be done that way too. If you did want to return std::string, your method is great because it plays well with RVO, and uses the std::string range constructor for possible optimizations. – mmocny Oct 21 '08 at 15:49
2

You cannot (should not) do this:

string[i] ^= string[length - i] ^= string[i] ^= string[length - i];

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XOR_swap_algorithm#Code_example

  • *"This code has undefined behavior, since it modifies the lvalue x twice without an intervening sequence point.
1

Actually, given the constraint that the original string be left unmodified, I think the original approach given in the question is the best. All these fancy approaches to reversing in place people are posting are great, but once copying the given string is factored in, they are all less efficient than simply copying the string backwards.

  • Only if it stops half-way; as written, it is switching everything twice, isn't it? – Jonathan Leffler Oct 20 '08 at 19:45
  • No - scratch that comment; this one is not an in-place stuff. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 20 '08 at 19:46
  • Well, of course they're fancy approaches. This is an interview question we're talking about. :) – nsayer Oct 20 '08 at 22:26
1

We've used this question before -- with the surprisingly results of finding a lot of people that can't do it (even with significant C/C++ experience!). I prefer the in-place variant since it saves some overhead, and has the added twist of only needing to iterate over strlen(s)/2 characters.

Your solution in an interview would be fine. A (correct!) solution using pointer instead of array syntax would rate a bit higher since it shows a greater comfort level with pointers which are so critical in C/C++ programming.

The minor critiques would be to point out that strlen returns a size_t not an int, and you should use delete [] on rev_str.

  • The in-place variant needs to iterate over 3*strlen(s)/2 characters, because it has to call strlen first. – Sol Oct 20 '08 at 19:15
  • I would argue that the only reason to use pointers in this exercise would be to demonstrate skill in pointers. Array syntax makes for clearer code. You could argue that choosing pointers demonstrates a tendency to showboat! – slim Oct 21 '08 at 7:39
1

WRT: "Now do it without temporary holding variable"... Something like this perhaps (and keeping array indexing for now):

int length = strlen(string);
for(int i = 0; i < length/2; i++) {
  string[i] ^= string[length - i];
  string[length - i] ^= string[i];
  string[i] ^= string[length - i];
}
0

this works nicely:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

void reverse_string(char *str) {    
    char *end = str + strlen(str) - 1;
    while (str < end) {
        std::iter_swap(str++, end--);
    }
}

int main() {
    char s[] = "this is a test";
    reverse_string(s);
    std::cout << "[" << s << "]" << std::endl;
}
0

I would have solved it sort of like this (my c is a bit rusty though, forgive me)

char *reverse( const char *source ) {
  int len = strlen( source );
  char *dest = new char[ len + 1 ];
  int i = 0;
  int j = len;
  while( j > 0 ) {
    dest[j--] = src[i++];
  }
  dest[i] = \0;
  return dest;
}
0

It wouldn't be more efficient, but you could demonstrate knowledge of data structures by doing something like pushing each letter onto a stack, and then popping them off into your newly allocated buffer.

It would take two passes and a scratch stack, but I would probably trust myself more to get this right the first time then to not make an off-by one error like the above.

char* stringReverse(const char* sInput)
{
    std::size_t nLen = strlen(sInput);
    std::stack<char> charStack;
    for(std::size_t i = 0; i < nLen; ++i)
    {
        charStack.push(sInput[i]);
    }
    char * result = new char[nLen + 1];
    std::size_t counter = 0;
    while (!charStack.empty())
    {
        result[counter++] = charStack.top();
        charStack.pop();
    }
    result[counter] = '\0';
    return result;
}
  • First, I didn't think knowing about something as basic as a stack needed demonstration. Second, just trying to demonstrate it in this case would be pretty negative for an interview, IMO. Would seem to indicate the candidate just throws stuff around without understanding it. – MichaelGG Oct 20 '08 at 20:25
  • It's also about not reinventing the wheel -- the other implementations have a risk of off-by-one errors -- I'll edit to show the code. – JohnMcG Oct 20 '08 at 20:39
0

When asking this question as an interviewer, I am looking to a clean, understandable solution and may ask how the initial solution could be made more efficient. I'm not interested in 'smart' solutions.

I am thinking about thing like; has the candidate made the old with off by one error in their loop, do they pre-allocate enough memory, do they check to bad input, do they use sufficiently efficient types.

Unfortunately, as already pointed out, too many people can't even do this.

0

String reversed in place, no temp variable.

static inline void
byteswap (char *a, char *b)
{
  *a = *a^*b;
  *b = *a^*b;
  *a = *a^*b;
}

void
reverse (char *string)
{
  char *end = string + strlen(string) - 1;

  while (string < end) {
    byteswap(string++, end--);
  }
}
  • For safety's sake, byteswap() should first check if a == b and return immediately if so. Note that I said a == b, not *a == *b. If you try and swap the same memory location with itself, the XOR method will change it to 0 instead. – nsayer Oct 20 '08 at 22:36
  • Good point. I should also check the string isn't NULL, but I wanted to keep the example lean. – Andrew Johnson Oct 20 '08 at 22:48
0

A method that doesn't need temporary variables

int length = strlen(string);
for(int i = 0; i < length/2; i++) {
  string[i] ^= string[length - i] ^= string[i] ^= string[length - i];
}
0

If I was doing the interviewing I would be a bit more fussy with the quality of the solution in terms of its robustness, not just it's performance.

All of the answers submitted thus far will fail if passed a null pointer - most of them leap to immediately calling strlen() on a possible null pointer - which will probably segfault your process.

Many of the answers are obsessive about performance to the point that they miss one of the key issues of the question: reverse a const char *, i.e. you need to make a reversed copy, not reverse in-place. You'll find it difficult to halve the number of iterations if a copy is required!

This is an interview question, so we want to look at the details of the algorithm, but in the real world this just highlights the value of using standard libraries whenever possible.

0

.

char * reverse(const char * str)
{
  if (!str)
    return NULL;

  int length = strlen(str);
  char * reversed_string = new char[length+1];

  for(int i = 0; i < length/2; ++i)
  {
    reversed_string[i] = str[(length-1) - i];
    reversed_string[(length-1) - i] = str[i];
  }
  //need to null terminate the string
  reversed_string[length] = '\0';

  return reversed_string;

}

Half the time but same complexity (note may be off by one error)

0

Above for loop has typo. Check of loop variable i should be <= instead of <, othrewise will fail for odd no of elements. for(int i = 0; i <= length/2; ++i)

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