1

Is there a cleaner way for doing this ?

public void change(char x)
{
    if(x == 'a')
    {
       return 'b';
    }
    else if(x == 'b')
    {
       return 'a';
    }
    else if(x == 't')
    {
       return 'r';
    }
    else if(x == 'r')
    {
       return 't';
    }
    return 'z';
}

I was wondering if there was anything built into Java so that I can swap pairs of characters like a dictionary in Python or is this the best way to do this?

14
  • no it is just switching four characters Feb 21, 2014 at 22:30
  • 1
    That looks quite simple and readable to me. Shorter is not always better.
    – JB Nizet
    Feb 21, 2014 at 22:31
  • 1
    oh, compile it. bytecodes will be shorter :-) [TGIF]
    – Leo
    Feb 21, 2014 at 22:57
  • 1
    very very easy to read :-) return c=='a'?'b':c=='b'?'a':c=='t'?'r':c=='r'?'t':'z';
    – Leo
    Feb 21, 2014 at 23:01
  • 1
    @JohannesH. and java uses UNICODE... ;-)
    – Leo
    Feb 21, 2014 at 23:07

6 Answers 6

12

One might try the following:

public char change(char x) {
    final String dictionary = "abtr";
    final String transform = "bart";

    int loc= dictionary.indexOf(x);
    if (loc < 0) {
        return 'z';
    } else {
        return transform.charAt(loc);
    }
}
4
  • The "default" value is "z" for the author, not x itself. I have edited your answer. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:57
  • Nice one! I really like that one, it's short, readable and has little overhead. The only drawback is, that Java has to loop over both strings, which might be a performance issue for large replacement maps. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:57
  • Well a loop over dictionary, but calculated position for transform. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:59
  • Erm... right. So loop only over one string, agreed ;) Feb 21, 2014 at 23:04
12

Well, it's not making it much shorter, but at least nicer: you could use the switch statement instead of your if-elseif-elseif-... construct.

public char change(char x)
{
    switch (x) {
        case 'a':
            return 'b';
        case 'b':
            return 'a';
        case 't':
            return 'r';
        case 'r':
            return 't';
        default:
            return 'z';
    }
}
7
  • 2
    what if you had so many pairs ? what if there were new pairs dynamically created at run time ? Feb 21, 2014 at 22:34
  • 1
    "like dictionary in python" How is this like a Python Dictionary? Feb 21, 2014 at 22:35
  • 2
    you need a char return type there :)
    – Reimeus
    Feb 21, 2014 at 22:35
  • @Mhd.Tahawi No such requirement is specified in the quesiton. If those are true, one should consider jeremyjjbrown's solution. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:35
  • I cut "like dictionary in python" out of the question. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:36
7

"so that i can swap pairs of characters like dictionary in python"

Just use a Map. It's just like a Python Dictionary.

Map<Character, Character> likeADict = new HashMap<Character, Character>();
likeADict.put('a','b');
likeADict.get('a');

You can add and remove values from it at runtime.

5
  • 1
    I consider this an overkill. A HashMap has quite some overhead, it's not a particulary small structure... for something that simple, I wouldn't wast the memory and lookup time. BUt, agreed: It's the most flexible solution one can do. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:34
  • 1
    He still needs to check for null as return value to return the default (in his case z) Feb 21, 2014 at 22:35
  • @Mhd.Tahawi No, once is enough. Although the put is idempotent so he could put each pair x times. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:41
  • @jeremyjjbrown, the pairs he has in his question are symmetric. if a swaps with b then b should swap with a. so I guess he need to insert the pair and its inverse to work , right ? in order for this to function as a two way map. or no ? Feb 21, 2014 at 22:50
  • @Mhd.Tahawi Sure that's true for any of these solutions. Feb 21, 2014 at 22:51
2

another cool way is using enum, that way adding new swap value is easy, just add a mapping into the enum

public enum swap{
    a('b'),
    b('a'),
    t('r'),     
    r('t'),
    z('z');

    private swap(char c){
        this.value=c;
    }
    public final char value;
}

and the use is:

public char change(char x)
{
   swap swapObject = swap.valueOf(Character.toString(x));
   return swapObject.value;
}
2
  • This has numerous errors. (1) Does not compile. swap.valueOf(x) should be swap.valueOf(Character.toString(x)). (2) change needs to return something. (3) The OP's code changed all characters other than a, b, t, r, to z, and this code doesn't do that. In fact, it doesn't work at all unless x is one of those five. (4) This approach only works when all the characters to be swapped are letters.
    – ajb
    Feb 21, 2014 at 23:46
  • i have changed the code, thanks.i do agree that in case we don't know all the cases we deal with or if we want a default value this approach is not good enough but for this scenario it seems sufficient.
    – knightsb
    Feb 22, 2014 at 1:46
0

You could use a Map, E.G:

public char change(char x) {
    Map <Character, Character> dictionary = new HashMap<Character, Character>() {{
        put('a', 'b');
        put('b', 'a');
        put('t', 'r');
        put('r', 't');
    }};

    if (dictionary.containsKey(x)) {
        return dictionary.get(x);
    } else {
        return 'z';
    }
}

However I wouldn't bother if its just a few characters. And I would probably make the dictionary a class field.

-1

The dictionary technic is more flexible but not shorter (like every thing in java). Here is a complete example.

package example;

import java.util.TreeMap;

public class Dictionary {

    static final TreeMap<Character,Character> myDict = new TreeMap();

    static Character choose(TreeMap<Character,Character> dict, 
                            Character x, Character def) {
        Character result = dict.get(x);
        if (result==null) result = def;
        return result;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        myDict.put('a','b');
        myDict.put('b','a');
        myDict.put('r','t');
        System.out.println(choose(myDict,'a','z'));
        System.out.println(choose(myDict,'b','z'));
        System.out.println(choose(myDict,'r','z'));
        System.out.println(choose(myDict,'X','z'));
    }
}
5
  • 2
    Why use a TreeMap, which is O(log n), instead of a HashMap, which is O(1), when you don't care about the order of the keys? Also, it should be new TreeMap<>().
    – JB Nizet
    Feb 21, 2014 at 22:45
  • I like TreeMap .. yes HashMap is also OK.. and new TreeMap<> is possible but not nessesary OR?
    – huckfinn
    Feb 21, 2014 at 22:50
  • 4
    @huckfinn "I like" is not a particular good reason for a bad design choice... You do realize that different Map (as well as different List) implementations have different characteristics for a reason? Feb 21, 2014 at 22:52
  • You "like" it? Any good reason? The diamond avoids using raw types and getting unchecked warnings from the compiler.
    – JB Nizet
    Feb 21, 2014 at 22:52
  • Please stop pitching pennies, dimonds and map types.. Is the solution OK?
    – huckfinn
    Feb 21, 2014 at 23:00

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