174

Go's range can iterate over maps and slices, but I was wondering if there is a way to iterate over a range of numbers, something like this:

for i := range [1..10] {
    fmt.Println(i)
}

Or is there a way to represent range of integers in Go like how Ruby does with the class Range?

10 Answers 10

223
2

You can, and should, just write a for loop. Simple, obvious code is the Go way.

for i := 1; i <= 10; i++ {
    fmt.Println(i)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 265
    I don't think most people would call this three-expression version more simple than what @Vishnu wrote. Only perhaps after years and years of C or Java indoctrination ;-) – Thomas Ahle Jun 28 '14 at 21:06
  • 12
    IMO the point is that you are always going to have this three-expression version of the for loop (i.e. you can do a lot more with it, the syntax from the OP is only good for that more restricted case of a number range, so in any language you're going to want this extended version) and it sufficiently accomplishes the same task, and isn't remarkably different anyway, so why have to learn/remember another syntax. If you are coding on a large and complex project you have enough to worry about already without having to fight the compiler about various syntaxes for something as simple as a loop. – Brad Peabody Apr 5 '15 at 19:43
  • 3
    @ThomasAhle especially considering C++ is officially adding notation for_each(x,y) inspired by the boost template library – don bright Feb 8 '17 at 2:02
  • 5
    @BradPeabody this is actually a matter of preference. Python does not have the 3-expression loop and works fine. Many consider the for-each syntax a lot less error-prone and there is nothing intrinsically inefficient about it. – VinGarcia Jun 17 '17 at 3:17
  • 3
    @necromancer here is a post from Rob Pike arguing for much the same thing as my answer. groups.google.com/d/msg/golang-nuts/7J8FY07dkW0/goWaNVOkQU0J . It may be that the Go community disagrees, but when it agrees with one of the authors of the language, it can't really be that bad of an answer. – Paul Hankin Jan 18 '18 at 17:47
43
1

Here is a program to compare the two ways suggested so far

import (
    "fmt"

    "github.com/bradfitz/iter"
)

func p(i int) {
    fmt.Println(i)
}

func plain() {
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        p(i)
    }
}

func with_iter() {
    for i := range iter.N(10) {
        p(i)
    }
}

func main() {
    plain()
    with_iter()
}

Compile like this to generate disassembly

go build -gcflags -S iter.go

Here is plain (I've removed the non instructions from the listing)

setup

0035 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:14) MOVQ    $0,AX
0036 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:14) JMP     ,38

loop

0037 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:14) INCQ    ,AX
0038 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:14) CMPQ    AX,$10
0039 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:14) JGE     $0,45
0040 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:15) MOVQ    AX,i+-8(SP)
0041 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:15) MOVQ    AX,(SP)
0042 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:15) CALL    ,p+0(SB)
0043 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:15) MOVQ    i+-8(SP),AX
0044 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:14) JMP     ,37
0045 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:17) RET     ,

And here is with_iter

setup

0052 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    $10,AX
0053 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    $0,~r0+-24(SP)
0054 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    $0,~r0+-16(SP)
0055 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    $0,~r0+-8(SP)
0056 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    $type.[]struct {}+0(SB),(SP)
0057 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    AX,8(SP)
0058 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    AX,16(SP)
0059 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) PCDATA  $0,$48
0060 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) CALL    ,runtime.makeslice+0(SB)
0061 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) PCDATA  $0,$-1
0062 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    24(SP),DX
0063 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    32(SP),CX
0064 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    40(SP),AX
0065 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    DX,~r0+-24(SP)
0066 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    CX,~r0+-16(SP)
0067 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    AX,~r0+-8(SP)
0068 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    $0,AX
0069 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) LEAQ    ~r0+-24(SP),BX
0070 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    8(BX),BP
0071 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    BP,autotmp_0006+-32(SP)
0072 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) JMP     ,74

loop

0073 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) INCQ    ,AX
0074 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    autotmp_0006+-32(SP),BP
0075 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) CMPQ    AX,BP
0076 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) JGE     $0,82
0077 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) MOVQ    AX,autotmp_0005+-40(SP)
0078 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:21) MOVQ    AX,(SP)
0079 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:21) CALL    ,p+0(SB)
0080 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:21) MOVQ    autotmp_0005+-40(SP),AX
0081 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:20) JMP     ,73
0082 (/home/ncw/Go/iter.go:23) RET     ,

So you can see that the iter solution is considerably more expensive even though it is fully inlined in the setup phase. In the loop phase there is an extra instruction in the loop, but it isn't too bad.

I'd use the simple for loop.

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    I can't "see that the iter solution is considerably more expensive." Your method of counting Go pseudo-assembler instructions is flawed. Run a benchmark. – peterSO Feb 22 '14 at 18:27
  • 11
    One solution calls runtime.makeslice and the other doesn't - I don't need a benchmark to know that is going to be a lot slower! – Nick Craig-Wood Feb 22 '14 at 18:45
  • 6
    Yes runtime.makeslice is clever enough not to allocate any memory if you ask for zero size allocation. However the above still calls it, and according to your benchmark does take 10nS longer on my machine. – Nick Craig-Wood Feb 23 '14 at 10:48
  • 4
    this reminds of people suggesting to use C over C++ for performance reasons – necromancer Jan 18 '18 at 10:50
  • 5
    Debating the runtime performance of nanosecond CPU operations, while common in Goland, seems silly to me. I'd consider that a very distant last consideration, after readability. Even if CPU performance were relevant, the contents of the for loop will almost always swamp whatever differences incurred by the loop itself. – Jonathan Hartley Jan 30 '19 at 19:50
34
0

It was suggested by Mark Mishyn to use slice but there is no reason to create array with make and use in for returned slice of it when array created via literal can be used and it's shorter

for i := range [5]int{} {
        fmt.Println(i)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    If you're not going to use the variable you can also omit the left side and use for range [5]int{} { – blockloop May 4 '18 at 3:07
  • 6
    Drawback is that 5 here is a literal and cannot be determined at run-time. – Steve Powell Jul 25 '18 at 14:44
  • Is it faster or comparable to normal three expressions for loop? – Amit Tripathi Jul 29 '18 at 18:56
  • @AmitTripathi yes, it's comparable, execution time is almost the same for billions of iterations. – Daniil Grankin Mar 27 '19 at 15:58
18
0

iter is a very small package that just provides a syntantically different way to iterate over integers.

for i := range iter.N(4) {
    fmt.Println(i)
}

Rob Pike (an author of Go) has criticized it:

It seems that almost every time someone comes up with a way to avoid doing something like a for loop the idiomatic way, because it feels too long or cumbersome, the result is almost always more keystrokes than the thing that is supposedly shorter. [...] That's leaving aside all the crazy overhead these "improvements" bring.

| improve this answer | |
  • 16
    Pike's critique is simplistic in that it only addresses the keystrokes rather than the mental overhead of constantly redeclaring ranges. Also, with most modern editors, the iter version actually uses fewer keystrokes because range and iter will autocomplete. – Chris Redford Apr 3 '17 at 19:04
  • 1
    @lang2, for loops are not a first class citizen of Unix like they are in go. Besides, unlike for, seq streams to standard output a sequence of numbers. Whether or not to iterate over them is up to the consumer. Though for i in $(seq 1 10); do ... done is common in Shell, it's only one way to do a for loop, which is itself only one way to consume the output of seq, albeit a very common one. – Daniel Farrell Nov 13 '17 at 23:13
  • 2
    Also, Pike simply doesn't consider the fact that a compile (given the language specs included a range syntax for this use case) could be build in a way to just treat i in range(10) exactly like i := 0; i < 10; i++. – Rouven B. Sep 13 '19 at 20:22
8
0

Here's a benchmark to compare a Go for statement with a ForClause and a Go range statement using the iter package.

iter_test.go

package main

import (
    "testing"

    "github.com/bradfitz/iter"
)

const loops = 1e6

func BenchmarkForClause(b *testing.B) {
    b.ReportAllocs()
    j := 0
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for j = 0; j < loops; j++ {
            j = j
        }
    }
    _ = j
}

func BenchmarkRangeIter(b *testing.B) {
    b.ReportAllocs()
    j := 0
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        for j = range iter.N(loops) {
            j = j
        }
    }
    _ = j
}

// It does not cause any allocations.
func N(n int) []struct{} {
    return make([]struct{}, n)
}

func BenchmarkIterAllocs(b *testing.B) {
    b.ReportAllocs()
    var n []struct{}
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        n = iter.N(loops)
    }
    _ = n
}

Output:

$ go test -bench=. -run=.
testing: warning: no tests to run
PASS
BenchmarkForClause      2000       1260356 ns/op           0 B/op          0 allocs/op
BenchmarkRangeIter      2000       1257312 ns/op           0 B/op          0 allocs/op
BenchmarkIterAllocs 20000000            82.2 ns/op         0 B/op          0 allocs/op
ok      so/test 7.026s
$
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    If you set loops to 10 then retry the benchmark you'll see a marked difference. On my machine the ForClause takes 5.6 ns whereas the Iter takes 15.4 ns, so calling the allocator (even though it is clever enough not to allocate anything) still costs 10ns and a whole heap of extra I-cache busting code. – Nick Craig-Wood Feb 23 '14 at 10:46
  • I would be interested to see your benchmarks and critiques for the package I created and referenced in my answer. – Chris Redford Apr 3 '17 at 18:58
5
0

While I commiserate with your concern about lacking this language feature, you're probably just going to want to use a normal for loop. And you'll probably be more okay with that than you think as you write more Go code.

I wrote this iter package — which is backed by a simple, idiomatic for loop that returns values over a chan int — in an attempt to improve on the design found in https://github.com/bradfitz/iter, which has been pointed out to have caching and performance issues, as well as a clever, but strange and unintuitive implementation. My own version operates the same way:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "github.com/drgrib/iter"
)

func main() {
    for i := range iter.N(10) {
        fmt.Println(i)
    }
}

However, benchmarking revealed that the use of a channel was a very expensive option. The comparison of the 3 methods, which can be run from iter_test.go in my package using

go test -bench=. -run=.

quantifies just how poor its performance is

BenchmarkForMany-4                   5000       329956 ns/op           0 B/op          0 allocs/op
BenchmarkDrgribIterMany-4               5    229904527 ns/op         195 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkBradfitzIterMany-4          5000       337952 ns/op           0 B/op          0 allocs/op

BenchmarkFor10-4                500000000         3.27 ns/op           0 B/op          0 allocs/op
BenchmarkDrgribIter10-4            500000      2907 ns/op             96 B/op          1 allocs/op
BenchmarkBradfitzIter10-4       100000000        12.1 ns/op            0 B/op          0 allocs/op

In the process, this benchmark also shows how the bradfitz solution underperforms in comparison to the built-in for clause for a loop size of 10.

In short, there appears to be no way discovered so far to duplicate the performance of the built-in for clause while providing a simple syntax for [0,n) like the one found in Python and Ruby.

Which is a shame because it would probably be easy for the Go team to add a simple rule to the compiler to change a line like

for i := range 10 {
    fmt.Println(i)
}

to the same machine code as for i := 0; i < 10; i++.

However, to be fair, after writing my own iter.N (but before benchmarking it), I went back through a recently written program to see all the places I could use it. There actually weren't many. There was only one spot, in a non-vital section of my code, where I could get by without the more complete, default for clause.

So while it may look like this is a huge disappointment for the language in principle, you may find — like I did — that you actually don't really need it in practice. Like Rob Pike is known to say for generics, you might not actually miss this feature as much as you think you will.

| improve this answer | |
4
0

If you want to just iterate over a range w/o using and indices or anything else, this code sample worked just fine for me. No extra declaration needed, no _. Haven't checked the performance, though.

for range [N]int{} {
    // Body...
}

P.S. The very first day in GoLang. Please, do critique if it's a wrong approach.

| improve this answer | |
  • So far (version 1.13.6), it doesn't work at. Throwing non-constant array bound at me. – WHS Jan 25 at 20:57
1
0

You can also check out github.com/wushilin/stream

It is a lazy stream like concept of java.util.stream.

// It doesn't really allocate the 10 elements.
stream1 := stream.Range(0, 10)

// Print each element.
stream1.Each(print)

// Add 3 to each element, but it is a lazy add.
// You only add when consume the stream
stream2 := stream1.Map(func(i int) int {
    return i + 3
})

// Well, this consumes the stream => return sum of stream2.
stream2.Reduce(func(i, j int) int {
    return i + j
})

// Create stream with 5 elements
stream3 := stream.Of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

// Create stream from array
stream4 := stream.FromArray(arrayInput)

// Filter stream3, keep only elements that is bigger than 2,
// and return the Sum, which is 12
stream3.Filter(func(i int) bool {
    return i > 2
}).Sum()

Hope this helps

| improve this answer | |
0
0
package main

import "fmt"

func main() {

    nums := []int{2, 3, 4}
    for _, num := range nums {
       fmt.Println(num, sum)    
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Add some context to your code to help future readers better understand its meaning. – Grant Miller Jul 26 '18 at 3:15
  • 3
    what is this? sum is not defined. – naftalimich Nov 6 '18 at 18:12
0
0

I have written a package in Golang which mimic the Python's range function:

Package https://github.com/thedevsaddam/iter

package main

import (
    "fmt"

    "github.com/thedevsaddam/iter"
)

func main() {
    // sequence: 0-9
    for v := range iter.N(10) {
        fmt.Printf("%d ", v)
    }
    fmt.Println()
    // output: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

    // sequence: 5-9
    for v := range iter.N(5, 10) {
        fmt.Printf("%d ", v)
    }
    fmt.Println()
    // output: 5 6 7 8 9

    // sequence: 1-9, increment by 2
    for v := range iter.N(5, 10, 2) {
        fmt.Printf("%d ", v)
    }
    fmt.Println()
    // output: 5 7 9

    // sequence: a-e
    for v := range iter.L('a', 'e') {
        fmt.Printf("%s ", string(v))
    }
    fmt.Println()
    // output: a b c d e
}

Note: I have written for fun! Btw, sometimes it may be helpful

| improve this answer | |

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