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I'm very new to programming, and don't understand much. I've been trying to build a simple game where a user and computer compete by rolling dice to earn points. My method is posted below. The computer is only allowed to earn 20 points per turn.

My issue is that I need the value of variable computerTotal to be remembered after the method has been called and completed. I want to ensure that whenever the computerTurn method is finished, I can use that calculated variable computerTotal outside of that method.

I tried establishing a new int in the .java file class (but outside of the method), and then using that int within the method to hold the value, however I receive errors about the integer needing to be static?

This is all very confusing to me. Can anyone help me out?

public static void computerTurn() {

    System.out.println("Passed to Computer.");

    Die computerDie1, computerDie2;
    int computerRound, computerTotal;
    computerRound = 0;
    computerTotal = 0;


    while (computerTotal < 21){
    computerDie1 = new Die();
    computerDie2 = new Die();
    computerDie1.roll();
    computerDie2.roll();

    System.out.println("\n" + "CPU Die One: " + computerDie1 + ", CPU Die Two: " + computerDie2 + "\n");
    computerRound = computerDie1.getFaceValue() + computerDie2.getFaceValue();

    int cpuDie1Value;
    int cpuDie2Value;

    cpuDie1Value = computerDie1.getFaceValue();
    cpuDie2Value = computerDie2.getFaceValue();

    System.out.println ("Points rolled this round for the Computer: " + computerRound);

    computerTotal = computerTotal + computerRound;

    System.out.println ("Total points for the Computer: " + computerTotal + "\n");
    }

6 Answers 6

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Any variables created inside a method are "local variables" meaning they cannot be used outside the method. Put a static variable outside of a method to create "global variables" which can be used anywhere.

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Add a method to your class

public static int getComputerTotal() { return ComputerTotal;}

Then you can get the value outside of the class by doing something like:

ComputerTurn();
ComputerTurn.getComputerTotal();
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Putting the variable outside of the method is on the right track, but since this method is static (meaning it cannot access variables that depend on object instances), it can only access static variables. Declare computerTotal in the class, outside of methods, using the following:

private static int computerTotal;

You should probably do some research on object-oriented programming and what static means in Java.

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Declare computerTotal as a member variable of your class, so that its value is available even outside the function.

class MyClass{
    private int computerTotal ;

    public  void function myFunction()
    {
         ........
         ......... // your calculations
         computerTotal = computerTotal + computerRound;      

    }

   public int getComputerTotal(){return     computerTotal ;}

}

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You have to declare the computertotal outside any methods to keep them. so like this:

public class name {
    int computertotal = 0; //v=can just uuse int computertotal;
    public void method() {
         while(computertotal < 20) {
                computertotal += 1;
         }
    }
}

And now he variable gets saved!

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You may need to add some setters and getters to get that int from another class.

class NewClass {
   private int yourInt = 1;
}

It is telling you to make it a static variable because you may be calling it in a statement like

NewClass.yourInt;

, a static variable is one that’s associated with a class, not objects of that class.

Setters and getters are methods which allows you to retrieve or set the value which is private from another class. You might want to add them in the NewClass, where your int is declared. Setters and getters looks like this.

Setter:

public void setYourInt(int newInt) {
   this.yourInt = newInt;
}

Getter:

public int getYourInt() {
   return this.yourInt;
}

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