5

I have been starting unit testing recently and am wondering, should I be writing unit tests for 100% code coverage?

This seems futile when I end up writing more unit testing code than production code.

I am writing a PHP Codeigniter project and sometimes it seems I write so much code just to test one small function.

For Example this Unit test

public function testLogin(){
    //setup
    $this->CI->load->library("form_validation");
    $this->realFormValidation=new $this->CI->form_validation;
    $this->CI->form_validation=$this->getMock("CI_Form_validation");
    $this->realAuth=new $this->CI->auth;
    $this->CI->auth=$this->getMock("Auth",array("logIn"));
    $this->CI->auth->expects($this->once())
                   ->method("logIn")
                   ->will($this->returnValue(TRUE));

    //test
    $this->CI->form_validation->expects($this->once())
        ->method("run")
        ->will($this->returnValue(TRUE));
    $_POST["login"]=TRUE;
    $this->CI->login();
    $out = $this->CI->output->get_headers();
    //check new header ends with dashboard
    $this->assertStringEndsWith("dashboard",$out[0][0]);

    //tear down
    $this->CI->form_validation=$this->realFormValidation;
    $this->CI->auth=$this->realAuth;

}
public function badLoginProvider(){
    return array(
        array(FALSE,FALSE),
        array(TRUE,FALSE)
    );
}
/**
 * @dataProvider badLoginProvider
 */
public function testBadLogin($formSubmitted,$validationResult){
    //setup
    $this->CI->load->library("form_validation");
    $this->realFormValidation=new $this->CI->form_validation;
    $this->CI->form_validation=$this->getMock("CI_Form_validation");

    //test
    $this->CI->form_validation->expects($this->any())
        ->method("run")
        ->will($this->returnValue($validationResult));
    $_POST["login"]=$formSubmitted;
    $this->CI->login();
    //check it went to the login page
    $out = output();
    $this->assertGreaterThan(0, preg_match('/Login/i', $out));

    //tear down
    $this->CI->form_validation=$this->realFormValidation;
}

For this production code

public function login(){
    if($this->input->post("login")){
        $this->load->library('form_validation');
        $username=$this->input->post('username');
        $this->form_validation->set_rules('username', 'Username', 'required');
        $this->form_validation->set_rules('password', 'Password', "required|callback_userPassCheck[$username]");
        if ($this->form_validation->run()===FALSE) {
            $this->load->helper("form");
            $this->load->view('dashboard/login');
        }
        else{
            $this->load->model('auth');
            echo "valid";
            $this->auth->logIn($this->input->post('username'),$this->input->post('password'),$this->input->post('remember_me'));
            $this->load->helper('url');
            redirect('dashboard');
        }
    }
    else{
        $this->load->helper("form");
        $this->load->view('dashboard/login');
    }
}

Where am I going so wrong?

3 Answers 3

3

In my opinion, it's normal for test code to be more than production code. But test code tends to be straightforward, once you get the hang of it, it's like a no brainer task to write tests.

Having said that, if you discover your test code is too complicated to write/to cover all the execution paths in your production code, that's a good indicator for some refactoring: your method may be too long, or attempts to do several things, or has so many external dependencies, etc...

Another point is that it's good to have high test coverage, but does not need to be 100% or some very high number. Sometimes there are code that has no logic, like code that simply delegates tasks to others. In that case you can skip testing them and use @codeCoverageIgnore annotation to ignore them in your code coverage.

2

In my opinion its logical that test are much more code because you have to test multiple scenarios, must provide test data and you have to check that data for every case.

Typically a test-coverage of 80% is a good value. In most cases its not necessary to test 100% of the code because you should not test for example setters and getter. Dont test just for the statistics ;)

2
  • Thanks, by not testing setters and getters go you mean things like public function foo(){ return somePrivateFoo; }
    – EdL
    Feb 23, 2014 at 16:54
  • Yep, the goal is to test your code and not PHP, Java or any other programming language nor its the goal to test any framework out there. So testing getters and setter will just test if PHP can set, get or return values ;) Its more about your programm is using that stuff correctly
    – Yser
    Feb 23, 2014 at 17:09
0

The answer is it depends, but generally no. If you are publishing a library then lots of tests are important and can even help create the examples for the docs.

Internal projects you would probably want to focus your code around complex functions and things which would be bad if they were to go wrong. For each test thing what is the value in having the test here rather than in the parent function?

What you would want to avoid is testing too much is anything that relies on implementation details, or say private method/functions, otherwise if you change the structure you'll find you'll have to repeatedly rewrite the entire suite of tests.

It is better to test at a higher level, the public functions or anything which is at the boundary between modules, a few tests at the highest level you can should yield reasonable converge and ensure the code works in the way that your code is actually called. This is not to say lower level functions shouldn't have tests but at that level it's more to check edge cases than to have a test for the typical case against every function.

Instead of creating tests to increase coverage, create tests to cover bugs as you find and fix them, create tests against new functionality when you would have to manually test it anyway. Create tests to guard against bad things which must not happen. Fragile tests which easily break during refactors should be removed or changed to be less dependant on the implementation of the function.

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