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I am trying to figure out how isolated certain points are within my data set. I am using two methods to determine isolation, the distance of the closest neighbor and the number of neighboring sites within a given radius. All my coordinates are in latitude and longitude

This is what my data looks like:

    pond            lat         long        area    canopy  avg.depth   neighbor    n.lat   n.long  n.distance  n.area  n.canopy    n.depth n.avg.depth radius1500
    A10             41.95928    -72.14605   1500    66      60.61538462                                 
    AA006           41.96431    -72.121     250     0       57.77777778                                 
    Blacksmith      41.95508    -72.123803  361     77      71.3125                                 
    Borrow.Pit.1    41.95601    -72.15419   0       0       41.44444444                                 
    Borrow.Pit.2    41.95571    -72.15413   0       0       37.7                                    
    Borrow.Pit.3    41.95546    -72.15375   0       0       29.22222222                                 
    Boulder         41.918223   -72.14978   1392    98      43.53333333                                 

I want to put the name of the nearest neighboring pond in the column neighbor, its lat and long in n.lat and n.long, the distance between the two ponds in n.distance, and the area, canopy and avg.depth in each of the appropriate columns.

Second, I want to put the number of ponds within 1500m of the target pond into radius1500.

Does anyone know of a function or package that will help me calculate the distances/numbers that I want? If it's an issue, it won't be hard to enter the other data I need, but the nearest neighbor's name and distance, plus the number of ponds within 1500m is what I really need help with.

Thank you.

35

Best option is to use libraries sp and rgeos, which enable you to construct spatial classes and perform geoprocessing.

library(sp)
library(rgeos)

Read the data and transform them to spatial objects:

mydata <- read.delim('d:/temp/testfile.txt', header=T)

sp.mydata <- mydata
coordinates(sp.mydata) <- ~long+lat

class(sp.mydata)
[1] "SpatialPointsDataFrame"
attr(,"package")
[1] "sp"

Now calculate pairwise distances between points

d <- gDistance(sp.mydata, byid=T)

Find second shortest distance (closest distance is of point to itself, therefore use second shortest)

min.d <- apply(d, 1, function(x) order(x, decreasing=F)[2])

Construct new data frame with desired variables

newdata <- cbind(mydata, mydata[min.d,], apply(d, 1, function(x) sort(x, decreasing=F)[2]))

colnames(newdata) <- c(colnames(mydata), 'neighbor', 'n.lat', 'n.long', 'n.area', 'n.canopy', 'n.avg.depth', 'distance')

newdata
            pond      lat      long area canopy avg.depth     neighbor    n.lat    n.long n.area n.canopy n.avg.depth
6            A10 41.95928 -72.14605 1500     66  60.61538 Borrow.Pit.3 41.95546 -72.15375      0        0    29.22222
3          AA006 41.96431 -72.12100  250      0  57.77778   Blacksmith 41.95508 -72.12380    361       77    71.31250
2     Blacksmith 41.95508 -72.12380  361     77  71.31250        AA006 41.96431 -72.12100    250        0    57.77778
5   Borrow.Pit.1 41.95601 -72.15419    0      0  41.44444 Borrow.Pit.2 41.95571 -72.15413      0        0    37.70000
4   Borrow.Pit.2 41.95571 -72.15413    0      0  37.70000 Borrow.Pit.1 41.95601 -72.15419      0        0    41.44444
5.1 Borrow.Pit.3 41.95546 -72.15375    0      0  29.22222 Borrow.Pit.2 41.95571 -72.15413      0        0    37.70000
6.1      Boulder 41.91822 -72.14978 1392     98  43.53333 Borrow.Pit.3 41.95546 -72.15375      0        0    29.22222
        distance
6   0.0085954872
3   0.0096462277
2   0.0096462277
5   0.0003059412
4   0.0003059412
5.1 0.0004548626
6.1 0.0374480316

Edit: if coordinates are in degrees and you would like to calculate distance in kilometers, use package geosphere

library(geosphere)

d <- distm(sp.mydata)

# rest is the same

This should provide better results, if the points are scattered across the globe and coordinates are in degrees

  • Thank you very much. The libraries you suggested are exactly what I needed! – user2934942 Feb 24 '14 at 16:18
  • This is some very informative and readable code, thanks! I am, however, unable to tweak it to my slightly different usecase: I need to find the closest points between two different datasets (I have a dataset of tweets, and I need the closest city to each tweet). What should I change? – jesusiniesta Mar 10 '15 at 20:46
  • 1
    use following as the function: sort(x[x>0], decreasing=F)[1] – Zbynek Aug 31 '16 at 18:44
  • 1
    @ike; sort orders values in row/column from smallest to highest or vice versa. but since you want to omit zero distances, first you must filter the data - x[x>0]. then you sort them and finally you just take the first value in sorted array ([1]). all clear? – Zbynek Sep 1 '16 at 17:13
  • 1
    @NicoCoallier it depends on units of coordinate system (for WGS, as in example, it is just a number, it does not use haversine distance) – Zbynek Apr 12 '17 at 8:25
1

The Solution propose by @Zbynek is quite nice but if you are looking for a distance between two neighboor in km like I am , I am proposing this solution.

   earth.dist<-function(lat1,long1,lat2,long2){

           rad <- pi/180
           a1 <- lat1 * rad
           a2 <- long1 * rad
           b1 <- lat2 * rad
           b2 <- long2 * rad
           dlat <- b1-a1
           dlon<- b2-a2
           a <- (sin(dlat/2))^2 +cos(a1)*cos(b1)*(sin(dlon/2))^2
           c <- 2*atan2(sqrt(a),sqrt(1-a))
           R <- 6378.145
           dist <- R *c
           return(dist)
           }


    Dist <- matrix(0,ncol=length(mydata),nrow=length(mydata.sp))

  for (i in 1:length(mydata)){
      for(j in 1:length(mydata.sp)){
          Dist[i,j] <- earth.dist(mydata$lat[i],mydata$long[i],mydata.sp$lat[j],mydata.sp$long[j])
 }}



     DDD <- matrix(0, ncol=5,nrow=ncol(Dist))   ### RECTIFY the nb of col by the number of variable you want

   for(i in 1:ncol(Dist)){
       sub<- sort(Dist[,i])[2]
       DDD[i,1] <- names(sub) 
       DDD[i,2] <- sub
       DDD[i,3] <- rownames(Dist)[i]
       sub_neig_atr <- Coord[Coord$ID==names(sub),]
       DDD[i,4] <- sub_neig_atr$area
       DDD[i,5] <- sub_neig_atr$canopy
       ### Your can add any variable you want here 

   }

    DDD <- as.data.frame(DDD)

    names(DDD)<-c("neigboor_ID","distance","pond","n.area","n.canopy")
   data <- merge(mydata,DDD, by="pond")

You end up getting a distance in km if your coordinates are long and lat.

Any suggestions to make it better ?

  • No need to wtire it on your own, there is already geosphere package - cran.r-project.org/web/packages/geosphere/geosphere.pdf – Zbynek Apr 13 '17 at 13:20
  • Which function in that package would calculate an euclidian distance in kilometers ? – Nico Coallier Apr 13 '17 at 13:40
  • I think distm and you can choose exact formula - default is Haversine, but there are more options (see the manual) – Zbynek Apr 13 '17 at 20:32

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