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I'm learning objective-C and Cocoa. In the Apple tutorial I'm working through there's a side note that says:

IBOutlet is a null-defined macro, which the C preprocessor removes at compile time.

I'm curious - what's a null-defined macro?

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#define IBOutlet

Whenever IBOutlet is used in program text, it will be replaced with nothing at all.

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FYI, in this particular case, the reason the IBOutlet even exists is simply so that Interface Builder can parse the source file and glean bits of understanding from it. It's a clue (well, a bit stronger than a clue) that the variable preceded by IBOutlet should show up as an Outlet in Interface Builder when designing your UIs.

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A null-defined macro is a macro which will be replaced by nothing (will be removed) by the preprocessor. It's role is to give a hint about something in code, such as:

#define IN
#define OUT
#define INOUT

int myFunction(IN char *name, INOUT char *address, OUT char *phone);

This declaration suggests that name is a input variable for the function, address is both input and output, phone is an output variable.

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    That's really cute. Reminds me of Ada (obviously). I prefer to prefix the parameter name with in or out. But same effect. – schwa Oct 3 '08 at 19:03
  • Same, except for lack of pollution of the namespace with crazy macros. ;) – Kos Jan 6 '11 at 16:19
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Also - if you're unsure how anything is defined - command double-click it and Xcode will open the definition in the original source file.

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Oh and while I'm at it. Option double click will (attempt to) open up the documentation for the double clicked symbol.

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    Why don't you merge the two answers and delete one? – Amarghosh Oct 18 '10 at 12:11

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