2

I have a data set that I need to do some specific sorting on. Here is a sample:

43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            97      1546    1435
43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            98      331     1539
43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            99      67      633
43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           51      2000    806
43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           52      228     1315
43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           61      2657    718
43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           62      893     1818
43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           63      1553    1293
43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            74      95      185
43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            75      1919    862
43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            79      1425    651
31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            86      137     300
31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            87      67      470
31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            88      1711    285

For each line, I need to sort the values from smallest to longest, and then find out the difference between each value. I then need to find the smallest difference between the sorted values, and append that number to the end of the line. Lastly (and here is the tricky part), I need to display all the lines in numerically sorted of the 'smallest difference' column, but the other values have to be in their original order.

For example, using the last line of the data set, the script would have to do the following:

Start:
31 61 1800 1891 47 3983 88 1711 285

Sorted:
31 47 61 88 285 1711 1800 1891 3983

Differences between each#
. 16 14 27 197 1426 89 91 2092

Smallest Difference:
14

Prepend smallest difference to ORIGINAL LINE in its own column:
14 31 61 1800 1891 47 3983 88 1711 285

And lastly, sort all the lines based on the newly added 'smallest difference' column. I don't care about the amount of white space between the columns, that can fluctuate as needed to make the script simpler.

This was a bit beyond my bash scripting ability, so I figured I'd turn to the Internet for help. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

  • I agree with the several people below, this is definitely a task bash is ill-suited for, the only reason to write it in straight bash is didactic. – U2EF1 Feb 25 '14 at 2:50
  • Awesome, thanks for all the help guys, I'm super thankful (and impressed) for how quick you guys were able to come up with a script that did exactly this. I've upvoted all working solutions and marked as the answer the solution that I implemented. Thanks again! – Eddie Feb 25 '14 at 22:31
5

I'd go with Perl for this:

perl -lane '
    BEGIN { $,=" "; sub numeric {$a <=> $b} } 
    @sorted   = sort numeric @F;
    @diffs    = map {$sorted[$_] - $sorted[$_-1]} 1..$#sorted;
    $min_diff = ( sort numeric @diffs )[0]; 
    print $min_diff, @F
' filename | sort -n
4 43 67 2772 2881 37 10189 63 1553 1293
4 43 67 2772 2881 47 8375 74 95 185
4 43 67 2772 2881 47 8375 75 1919 862
4 43 67 2772 2881 47 8375 79 1425 651
5 43 67 2772 2881 37 10189 62 893 1818
6 31 61 1800 1891 47 3983 87 67 470
6 43 37 1512 1591 59 2819 97 1546 1435
6 43 37 1512 1591 59 2819 98 331 1539
6 43 37 1512 1591 59 2819 99 67 633
6 43 67 2772 2881 37 10189 51 2000 806
6 43 67 2772 2881 37 10189 52 228 1315
6 43 67 2772 2881 37 10189 61 2657 718
14 31 61 1800 1891 47 3983 86 137 300
14 31 61 1800 1891 47 3983 88 1711 285

Ruby is even shorter:

ruby -ane '
  min_diff = $F.map(&:to_i).sort.each_cons(2).map {|a,b| b-a}.sort.min
  puts [min_diff, $F].join " "
' 
  • Don't forget "And lastly, sort all the lines based on the newly added 'smallest difference' column" – Digital Trauma Feb 25 '14 at 0:32
3

A bit of a mouthful, but I think this is more or less what you need:

#!/bin/bash

mapfile -t a < "$1"             # read file into an array

for i in ${!a[@]}; do           # loop over the array
    p=0                         # "previous" number
# convert line of numbers to one number per line, then sort and loop
    < <(for n in $(sort -n <<< "${a[i]//[[:blank:]]/$'\n'}" ); do
        if [ $p -gt 0 ]; then   # if not 1st number
            echo $((n-p))       # calculate difference
        fi
        p=$n                    # save number for next calc
    done | sort -n) read d _    # get smallest diff from process substitution
    echo "$d    ${a[i]}"         # paste difference at the start of the line
done | sort -n                  # sort by smallest difference

Save as a script, chmod +x and run:

$ ./nsort.sh input.txt
4   43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           63      1553    1293
4   43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            74      95      185
4   43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            75      1919    862
4   43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            79      1425    651
5   43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           62      893     1818
6   31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            87      67      470
6   43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            97      1546    1435
6   43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            98      331     1539
6   43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            99      67      633
6   43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           51      2000    806
6   43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           52      228     1315
6   43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           61      2657    718
14  31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            86      137     300
14  31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            88      1711    285
$ 

Note mapfile is new to , since version 4.0 If you have an older version, you'd need a while read loop to read the file into an array.


Normally you should give some idea of what you have tried and not count on the SO community to write your scripts for you in their entirety.

  • Thanks for the suggestion. In truth, I've only ever done Bash scripting and haven't done anything witH Perl/Python, they are next on my languages to learn. In bash, I had no clue how to even start :( I am very thankful for the Stackoverflow community for so willingly (and quickly!) helping me out with this. – Eddie Feb 25 '14 at 22:29
2

Using Gnu Awk version 4:

awk -f a.awk file

where a.awk is:

BEGIN {
    PROCINFO["sorted_in"]="@val_num_asc"
}
{
    for (i=1; i<=NF; i++)
        a[i]=$i
    j=0; 
    for (i in a) {
        j++;   
        if (j>1) {
            d=a[i]-prev;
            if (j==2) mind=d;
            else if (d<mind) mind=d;
        }
        prev=a[i]
    }
    b[FNR]=(mind OFS $0)
    c[FNR]=mind
}
END {
    for (i in c)
        print b[i]
}

Output:

4 43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           63      1553    1293
4 43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            74      95      185
4 43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            75      1919    862
4 43      67      2772    2881    47      8375            79      1425    651
5 43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           62      893     1818
6 43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            97      1546    1435
6 43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            98      331     1539
6 43      37      1512    1591    59      2819            99      67      633
6 43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           51      2000    806
6 43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           52      228     1315
6 43      67      2772    2881    37      10189           61      2657    718
6 31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            87      67      470
14 31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            86      137     300
14 31      61      1800    1891    47      3983            88      1711    285
1

In a line of python:

In [2]: sorted([[max([l[n-1]-l[n] for n in range(len(l))])]+l for l in [[int(i) for i in line.split()] for line in open("file.tsv", 'r').readlines()], key=lambda line: line[0])

Where "file.tsv" is whatever file holds the data.

  • I don't see the point in long one-line answers unless the OP specifically requests it or you're playing code-golf. IMO, unless the line is (a fairly arbitrary) 40 chars or less (definitely no more than 80), readability suffers dramatically when otherwise prettily indented code blocks are smushed onto one line. – Digital Trauma Feb 25 '14 at 17:47
  • @DigitalTrauma it's for fun, mostly. Everyone needs a hobby. I also saw some fairly involved answers, 10+ lines of multiple-looping code, and wanted to show that something else could achieve similar results. – a p Feb 25 '14 at 22:06
  • Doing it just for the challenge - I get it. You should really check out the Programming Puzzles & Code Golf.SE beta :) – Digital Trauma Feb 25 '14 at 22:19

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