1

So I'm using Monte Carlo method to evaluate definite integral of a bunch of functions. To start with,

    y = x ^ (-0.5) ; for x in [0.01,1]

for which, my code in R looks like this

#
s <- NULL

m<- 100
a<- 0.01
b<- 1
set.seed(5)
x<-runif(m,a,b)
y<-runif(m,0,1)

for (i in 1:m){
if(y[i]<(x[i]^(-0.5))){
s[i] <- 1
}
else{
s[i] <-0
}
}


nn<-sum(s==1)*(b-a)/m
print(nn)
#

Answer (nn) : 0.99

Actual answer: 1.8

I cannot figure out where I'm going wrong with this. Have I done something wrong?

2

A number less than 1 to the power of something negative will always be greater than anything less than one, so you shouldn't be surprised when you get a vector of all 1s.

The rectangle you're using is too short (a height of 1). In reality, it should be 10 tall (since 0.01^-0.5=10) is the maximum value.

Then you take the total area of the rectangle and multiply it by the average of s, so the revised code looks like this:

s <- NULL

m<- 100
a<- 0.01
b<- 1
set.seed(5)
x<-runif(m,a,b)
y<-10*runif(m,0,1)

for (i in 1:m){
    if(y[i]<(x[i]^(-0.5))){
        s[i] <- 1
    }
    else{
        s[i] <-0
    }
}

nn<-sum(s)*(b-a)/m*10#note that the addition of the area of the rectangle
print(nn)

I got a result of 1.683, which is a lot closer to the real answer.

Edit: made a superfluous multiplication, answer revised slightly

2
  • This is helpful. I never thought of having to change the rectangle under consideration based on minimum/maximum values at all. I also had one other question. The same code - vectorised, and not using any "for" loops, gives me a much different answer. Any idea why? Here's the code : m<-100000 a<-0.01 b<-1 set.seed(7063257) x<-runif(m,a,b) y<-10*runif(m,0,1) s<-ifelse(y<(x^(-0.05)),1,0) s<-sum(s)*10*(b-a)/m print(s) I get approx 1.038 – Raaj Feb 25 '14 at 3:54
  • There is an extra zero in your power: -0.05 instead of -0.5. Your code works if this is corrected – user20650 Feb 25 '14 at 13:59
1

As user1362215 points out, your function should be contained in the rectangle. You get closer to the solution if you increase n. Here is a vectorised solution. Results are in the range.

# Hit and miss

f <- function(x) x ^ (-0.5)

n <- 1000000
a <- 0.01
b <- 1

#ceiling(max(f((seq(0.01,1,by=0.001)))))
#[1] 10

set.seed(5)
x <- runif(n,a,b)
y <- 10*runif(n,0,1)
R <- sum(y < f(x))/n
(b-a)*10*R

#[1] 1.805701


# Repeat a few times to look at the distribution
set.seed(5)
n <- 100000
r <- replicate(1000,sum(10*runif(n,0,1) < f(runif(n,a,b)))/n *(b-a)*10)
hist(r)
summary(r)

#   Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
#  1.755   1.792   1.800   1.800   1.809   1.845 



# Sample mean method for comparison
set.seed(5)
r <- replicate(1000, mean(f(runif(n, a,b)))*(b-a))
hist(r)
summary(r)

#   Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
#  1.788   1.798   1.800   1.800   1.803   1.813 

Re your edit: I am assuming the x*2 + y^2, [-1,1] you are referring to a circle rather than a function f(z). So really to estimate area of unit circle/Pi by simulation.

f2 <- function(x)   sqrt(1-x^2)

s <- seq(-1 , 1 ,by=0.001)
plot(s,f2(s))
# Get the max value of function within the range
c <- ceiling(max(f2(s)))
# [1] 1

n <- 1000000
a <- -1
b <- 1

set.seed(5)
x <- runif(n,a,b)
y <- c*runif(n,0,1)
R <- sum(y < f2(x))/n

(b-a)*c*R
#[1] 1.57063 # multiply it by 2 to get full area

pi/2
#[1] 1.570796
9
  • Nice job including the distributional behavior! – pjs Feb 25 '14 at 14:42
  • Brilliant. Thank you. Another question - how does one select the value to multiply the length with? I mean, for this function , as @user1362215 pointed out, I needed to perform "10*runif..." instead of just "runif" based on maximum value. Suppose I had a function like "x^2 + y^2" instead, [x,y from -1 to 1] , would that mean I have to consider "2*runif" ? – Raaj Feb 25 '14 at 16:05
  • @Raaj; Yes,it would depend on the function - i would just look for the maximum across the range (&so avoid any differentiation if poss). I'm sure the others are better placed to advise here – user20650 Feb 25 '14 at 17:21
  • Re: x^2 + y^2 [x,y : -1 to 1] When I solve it manually, I end up getting 8/3 or 2.6667. When I solve using MC , I get 3.2 I notice that when I change the maximum ceiling, the value changes as it should be. However, I'm just wondering if this is the best estimation MC can give me because the difference seems to be too much! Hence I asked about choosing the "c" value in your code above (the maximum of the function) – Raaj Feb 25 '14 at 19:30
  • Increasing c should not change results much - run the above edit code changing c=10. Are you wanting to calculate the area of a circle (for unit circle x*2 + y*2 = 1)? Answer should be Pi. – user20650 Feb 25 '14 at 19:47
1

A Monte Carlo alternative to acceptance/rejection is to uniformly generate x values, average the resulting y = f(x) values to estimate the average height, and multiply that by the interval length to get the estimated area. I don't know R well enough, so here it is in Ruby to illustrate the algorithm:

def f(x)
  x ** -0.5
end

sum = 0.0
10000.times { sum += f(0.01 + 0.99 * rand) }
print (1.0 - 0.01) * (sum / 10000)

I'm getting results in the range 1.8 +/- 0.02

You can also improve the precision of your estimator by using antithetic random variates - for each x you generate, also use the symmetric x value mirrored about the median of the x's.

Using @user20650's code for guidance for how to do this in R, you can estimate Pi / 2 as follows:

f <- function(x)    sqrt(1-x^2)
n <- 100000
a <- -1
b <- 1
range <- b-a
set.seed(5)
r <- replicate(1000, mean(f(runif(n,a,b))) * range)
hist(r)
summary(r)
#   Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
#  1.566   1.570   1.571   1.571   1.572   1.575 

No bounding function is needed for this approach, and generally it yields greater precision than the acceptance/rejection approach.

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