I have a file containing a large number of occurrences of the string Guid="GUID HERE" (where GUID HERE is a unique GUID at each occurrence) and I want to replace every existing GUID with a new unique GUID.

This is on a Windows development machine, so I can generate unique GUIDs with uuidgen.exe (which produces a GUID on stdout every time it is run). I have sed and such available (but no awk oddly enough).

I am basically trying to figure out if it is possible (and if so, how) to use the output of a command-line program as the replacement text in a sed substitution expression so that I can make this replacement with a minimum of effort on my part. I don't need to use sed -- if there's another way to do it, such as some crazy vim-fu or some other program, that would work as well -- but I'd prefer solutions that utilize a minimal set of *nix programs since I'm not really on *nix machines.

To be clear, if I have a file like this:

etc etc Guid="A" etc etc Guid="B"

I would like it to become this:

etc etc Guid="C" etc etc Guid="D"

where A, B, C, D are actual GUIDs, of course.

(for example, I have seen xargs used for things similar to this, but it's not available on the machines I need this to run on, either. I could install it if it's really the only way, although I'd rather not)

  • Are you familiar with Powershell? – user113476 Feb 4 '10 at 17:27
  • I know of it, but I don't regularly use it and don't have it installed. If there's a viable solution there, I'm all for it. – Josh Feb 4 '10 at 18:28
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I rewrote the C# solution in PowerShell. I figured it would be easier for you to run a powershell script then compile a C# exe.

Steps for using this:

  1. Download/install powershell
  2. Save the code below somewhere, named GuidSwap.ps1
  3. Modify the $filename and $outputFilename variables to suit your needs
  4. Run powershell -noexit c:\location\to\guidswap.ps1

## GuidSwap.ps1
##
## Reads a file, finds any GUIDs in the file, and swaps them for a NewGUID
##

$filename = "d:\test.txt"
$outputFilename = "d:\test_new.txt"

$text = [string]::join([environment]::newline, (get-content -path $filename))

$sbNew = new-object system.text.stringBuilder

$pattern = "[a-fA-F0-9]{8}-([a-fA-F0-9]{4}-){3}[a-fA-F0-9]{12}"

$lastStart = 0
$null = ([regex]::matches($text, $pattern) | %{
    $sbNew.Append($text.Substring($lastStart, $_.Index - $lastStart))
    $guid = [system.guid]::newguid()
    $sbNew.Append($guid)
    $lastStart = $_.Index + $_.Length
})
$null = $sbNew.Append($text.Substring($lastStart))

$sbNew.ToString() | out-file -encoding ASCII $outputFilename

Write-Output "Done"
  • I am a developer, I'm not sure where you saw otherwise. This, however, will be more useful than writing a C# app to do it. – Josh Feb 17 '10 at 20:34
  • Sorry about that. That was a different question where I saw that. – BigJoe714 Feb 17 '10 at 20:59
  • 1
    I wish I could upvote this more. This has saved me so much time. – Dan Field Mar 11 '15 at 19:46

Would you be open to compiling a C# console app to do this? I whipped this up real quick. It takes a filename as a command line argument, finds anything that looks like a GUID, replaces it with a new GUID, and writes the new contents of the file.

Take a look:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace GUIDSwap
{
    class Program
    {
        static int Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                if (args.Length == 0) throw new ApplicationException("No filename specified");

                string filename = args[0];
                filename = filename.TrimStart(new char[] { '"' }).TrimEnd(new char[] { '"' });

                if (!File.Exists(filename)) throw new ApplicationException("File not found");

                StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(filename);
                string text = sr.ReadToEnd();
                sr.Close();

                StringBuilder sbNew = new StringBuilder();

                string pattern = "[a-fA-F0-9]{8}-([a-fA-F0-9]{4}-){3}[a-fA-F0-9]{12}";

                int lastStart = 0;
                foreach (Match m in Regex.Matches(text, pattern))
                {
                    sbNew.Append(text.Substring(lastStart, m.Index - lastStart));
                    sbNew.Append(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());
                    lastStart = m.Index + m.Length;
                }

                sbNew.Append(text.Substring(lastStart));

                StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(filename, false);
                sw.Write(sbNew.ToString());
                sw.Flush();
                sw.Close();

                return 0;
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
                return 1;
            }
        }
    }
}

I was looking for a way to replace all GUIDs in a Visual Studio solution, so I took the answer to this StackOverflow question (GuidSwap.ps1) and extended it so that the script keeps track of GUIDs that are referenced across multiple files. An example is shown in the header below.

<#
    .Synopsis
    Replace all GUIDs in specified files under a root folder, carefully keeping track 
    of how GUIDs are referenced in different files (e.g. Visual Studio solution).

    Loosely based on GuidSwap.ps1:
    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2201740/replacing-all-guids-in-a-file-with-new-guids-from-the-command-line

    .NOTES
    Version:        1.0
    Author:         Joe Zamora (blog.idmware.com)
    Creation Date:  2016-03-01
    Purpose/Change: Initial script development

    .EXAMPLE
    .\ReplaceGuids.ps1 "C:\Code\IDMware" -FileNamePatterns @("*.sln","*.csproj","*.cs") -Verbose -WhatIf
#>

# Add common parameters to the script.
[CmdletBinding()]
param(
    $RootFolder
    ,$LogFolder='.'
    ,[String[]]$FileNamePatterns
    ,[switch]$WhatIf
)
$global:WhatIf = $WhatIf.IsPresent

# Change directory to the location of this script.
$scriptpath = $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path
$dir = Split-Path $scriptpath
cd $dir
$ScriptName = $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Name

If(!($RootFolder))
{
    Write-Host @"
Usage: $ScriptName  -RootFolder <RootFolder> [Options]

Options:
    -LogFolder <LogFolder>                      Defaults to location of script.

    -FileNamePatterns @(*.ext1, *.ext2, ...)    Defaults to all files (*).

    -WhatIf                                     Test run without replacements.

    -Verbose                                    Standard Powershell flags.
    -Debug
"@
    Exit
}

if ($LogFolder -and !(Test-Path "$LogFolder" -PathType Container))
{
    Write-Host "No such folder: '$LogFolder'"
    Exit
}

<#
    .Synopsis
    This code snippet gets all the files in $Path that contain the specified pattern.
    Based on this sample:
    http://www.adminarsenal.com/admin-arsenal-blog/powershell-searching-through-files-for-matching-strings/
#>
function Enumerate-FilesContainingPattern {
[CmdletBinding()]
param(
    $Path=(throw 'Path cannot be empty.')
    ,$Pattern=(throw 'Pattern cannot be empty.')
    ,[String[]]$FileNamePatterns=$null
)
    $PathArray = @()
    if (!$FileNamePatterns) {
        $FileNamePatterns = @("*")
    }

    ForEach ($FileNamePattern in $FileNamePatterns) {
        Get-ChildItem $Path -Recurse -Filter $FileNamePattern |
        Where-Object { $_.Attributes -ne "Directory"} |
        ForEach-Object {
            If (Get-Content $_.FullName | Select-String -Pattern $Pattern) {
                $PathArray += $_.FullName
            }
        }
    }
    $PathArray
} <# function Enumerate-FilesContainingPattern #>

# Timestamps and performance.
$stopWatch = [System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch]::StartNew()
$startTime = Get-Date
Write-Verbose @"

--- SCRIPT BEGIN $ScriptName $startTime ---

"@

# Begin by finding all files under the root folder that contain a GUID pattern.
$GuidRegexPattern = "[a-fA-F0-9]{8}-([a-fA-F0-9]{4}-){3}[a-fA-F0-9]{12}"
$FileList = Enumerate-FilesContainingPattern $RootFolder $GuidRegexPattern $FileNamePatterns

$LogFilePrefix = "{0}-{1}" -f $ScriptName, $startTime.ToString("yyyy-MM-dd_HH-mm-ss")
$FileListLogFile = Join-Path $LogFolder "$LogFilePrefix-FileList.txt"
$FileList | ForEach-Object {$_ | Out-File $FileListLogFile -Append}
Write-Host "File list log file:`r`n$FileListLogFile"
cat $FileListLogFile | %{Write-Verbose $_}

# Next, do a read-only loop over the files and build a mapping table of old to new GUIDs.
$guidMap = @{}
foreach ($filePath in $FileList)
{
    $text = [string]::join([environment]::newline, (get-content -path $filePath))
    Foreach ($match in [regex]::matches($text, $GuidRegexPattern)) {
        $oldGuid = $match.Value.ToUpper()
        if (!$guidMap.ContainsKey($oldGuid)) {
            $newGuid = [System.Guid]::newguid().ToString().ToUpper()
            $guidMap[$oldGuid] = $newGuid
        }
    }
}

$GuidMapLogFile = Join-Path $LogFolder "$LogFilePrefix-GuidMap.csv"
"OldGuid,NewGuid" | Out-File $GuidMapLogFile
$guidMap.Keys | % { "$_,$($guidMap[$_])" | Out-File $GuidMapLogFile -Append }
Write-Host "GUID map log file:`r`n$GuidMapLogFile"
cat $GuidMapLogFile | %{Write-Verbose $_}

# Finally, do the search-and-replace.
foreach ($filePath in $FileList) {
    Write-Verbose "Processing $filePath"
    $newText = New-Object System.Text.StringBuilder
    cat $filePath | % { 
        $original = $_
        $new = $_
        $isMatch = $false
        $matches = [regex]::Matches($new, $GuidRegexPattern)
        foreach ($match in $matches) {
            $isMatch = $true
            $new = $new -ireplace $match.Value, $guidMap[$match.Value.ToString().ToUpper()]
        }        
        $newText.AppendLine($new) | Out-Null
        if ($isMatch) {
            $msg = "Old: $original`r`nNew: $new"
            if ($global:WhatIf) {
                Write-Host "What if:`r`n$msg"
            } else {
                Write-Verbose "`r`n$msg"
            }
        }
    }
    if (!$global:WhatIf) {
        $newText.ToString() | Set-Content $filePath
    }
}

# Timestamps and performance.
$endTime = Get-Date
Write-Verbose @"

--- SCRIPT END $ScriptName $endTime ---

Total elapsed: $($stopWatch.Elapsed)
"@

you can just capture the uid into a variable first, then do the sed?

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
for /f %%x in ('uuidgen.exe') do (
        set uid=%%x
)
sed -e "s/Guid=\"\(.*\)\"/Guid=\"!uid!\"/g" file
  • Be careful that using .* in your regular expressions may cause it to grab more than you expect, depending on the mode that it's run in. You might consider instead doing something like "[^"]+" (Note how it explicitly will never swallow a literal " ) – Steven Schlansker Feb 5 '10 at 0:48
  • 2
    That appears to replace every GUID in the file with the same new GUID (when I try it). I need to replace every GUID with a new, unique GUID. – Josh Feb 5 '10 at 16:31

I really like the solution by BigJoe714. I took it one step further finding all specific extension files and replace all GUIDs.

<pre>
<code>
using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace AllGuidSwap
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            try
            {
                if (args.Length == 0) throw new ApplicationException("No filename specified");

                string directory = args[0]; //Path
                string extensionToFind = args[1]; //Extension to find

                if (!Directory.Exists(directory)) throw new ApplicationException("directory not found");

                var allFiles = Directory.GetFiles(directory).Where(a => a.EndsWith(extensionToFind));

                foreach (var filename in allFiles)
                {
                    if (!File.Exists(filename)) throw new ApplicationException("File not found");

                    var sr = new StreamReader(filename);
                    var text = sr.ReadToEnd();
                    sr.Close();

                    var sbNew = new StringBuilder();

                    var pattern = "[a-fA-F0-9]{8}-([a-fA-F0-9]{4}-){3}[a-fA-F0-9]{12}";

                    var lastStart = 0;
                    foreach (Match m in Regex.Matches(text, pattern))
                    {
                        sbNew.Append(text.Substring(lastStart, m.Index - lastStart));
                        sbNew.Append(Guid.NewGuid().ToString().ToUpperInvariant());
                        lastStart = m.Index + m.Length;
                    }

                    sbNew.Append(text.Substring(lastStart));

                    var sw = new StreamWriter(filename, false);
                    sw.Write(sbNew.ToString());
                    sw.Flush();
                    sw.Close();
                }

                Console.WriteLine("Successful");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            }

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

</code>
</pre>

protected by Community Jul 20 '15 at 3:16

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