7

The documented derivation constraint uses a where T : clause and the sample code that I'm tinkering with is

public class TwoThingsIPC<T> where T : IPassClass
{ ...
}

where IPassClass is an interface.

Code from a third-party that I am using has the format

public class TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass>
{ ...
}

Both result in the same behaviour in my code, but are they the same and if not what is the difference?

  • 3
    The second form just uses a type argument name that starts with I - that's not something I would recommend. It does not enforce any constraint. – 500 - Internal Server Error Feb 25 '14 at 21:26
  • 1
    The first is a generic constraint, the second is a generic argument – asawyer Feb 25 '14 at 21:26
  • "the same behaviour in my code"??? Can you have TwoThingsIPC<string> with both of the generic definitions? (you should be able to do it just fine with second version unless you are not showing relevant code) – Alexei Levenkov Feb 25 '14 at 21:42
  • @Alexei-- I can try using the string class as a constraint and argument to determine the difference as recommended by @asawyer. – Stephan Luis Feb 25 '14 at 21:56
9

They are not the same. The second declaration is misleading:

public class TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass>
{ ...
}

does not constrain the type to the IPassClass interface. It uses a poor choice of names for a generic argument. There's nothing preventing you from creating an instance of TwoThingsIPC<int> - the IPassClass references in the class's code would just be "replaced" by int.1

On the other hand, a variable of type TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass>, for example:

TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass> myVar = new TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass>();

does constrain the type to the IPassClass interface.


1 That's not what really happens, but I don't have a better explanation yet.

  • +1 Basically the IPassClass's interface name is "hiding" the IPassClass generic parameter, just like variables in methods "hide" fields in the containing class – BlackBear Feb 25 '14 at 22:01
2

Your example is wrong. An identifier is an identifier, and T and IPassClass are both just identifiers. What's in a name? So:

public class TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass>

is really the same as:

public class TwoThingsIPC<T>

except in the first case you use a really confusing name for the type parameter you declare there.

Maybe you were thinking of another situation where you will find yourself choosing between:

public class AnotherClass : TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass>

and:

public class AnotherClass<TPass> : TwoThingsIPC<TPass>
    where TPass : IPassClass

where in both cases IPassClass must be a type that is already declared elsewhere.

Note that the first of these is a non-generic class that has a generic class as its base class. The second one is a generic class (since TPass which is declared there is its type parameter) which has a base class that depends on its own generic parameter.

  • Thanks Jeppe do you know where I can find examples (do you know a simple one) that uses concrete class inheriting from a generic with an interface parameter? Like public class AnotherClass : TwoThingsIPC<IPassClass> . – Stephan Luis Feb 28 '14 at 11:01
1

In a generic type definition, the where clause is used to specify constraints on the types that can be used as arguments for a type parameter defined in a generic declaration.

In addition to interface constraints, a where clause can include a base class constraint, which states that a type must have the specified class as a base class (or be that class itself) in order to be used as a type argument for that generic type

If you want to examine an item in a generic list to determine whether it is valid or to compare it to some other item, the compiler must have some guarantee that the operator or method it has to call will be supported by any type argument that might be specified by client code. This guarantee is obtained by applying one or more constraints to your generic class definition.

References:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb384067.aspx
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d5x73970.aspx

0

The 'where' is a generic type constraint.

Taken from http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb384067.aspx

In a generic type definition, the where clause is used to specify constraints on the types that can be used as arguments for a type parameter defined in a generic declaration. For example, you can declare a generic class, MyGenericClass, such that the type parameter T implements the IComparable interface:

Here are some examples:

public class TwoThingsIPC<T> where T : IPassClass
{ 
}
public class TestClass
{
}
public class TestClass2 : IPassClass
{
}

var test1 = new TwoThingsIPC<TestClass>(); //this will not compile
var test2 = new TwoThingsIPC<TestClass2>(); //this will compile because it implements IPassClass 

Other examples:

public class TwoThingsIPC<T> where T : class
{
}
public class TestClass
{
}
var test1 = new TwoThingsIPC<int>(); //this will not compile because it is a value type

//these will compile because they are reference types 
var test2 = new TwoThingsIPC<TestClass>(); 
var test3 = new TwoThingsIPC<List<TestClass>>(); 

internal delegate void DWork();
var test4 = new TwoThingsIPC<DWork>(); 

References:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb384067.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d5x73970.aspx

0

Thanks for the help; to put together the pertinent responses and to make sure I have the facts correct:

The Asawyer comment to the original post points out the difference between a constraint and argument for generics ... while D Stanly illustrates how using an argument where a constraint is required can lead to sloppy type matching.

Jeppe Stig Nielsen figured out that I soon will want to write classes that inherit from the generic class with an interface argument. I have asked him where to find examples of how to do that.

All together solid support to get going with some dependency injection... Thanks again!

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