3

I'm very new to html and css, but I'm trying my best. I have the word Google in a table row that has every letter in the word colored a different color, like the Google logo actually is. To do this, the only way I could think of was to span each letter a different color. That's all fine and good. What I would like to do is make it so that when you hover over the word Google, it changes to the specified hover color. The code I have works to do that, but it does it to each letter individually, because of the spans. I would like that when the word Google is hovered over, the entire word changes color and not just the individual letter that is being hovered over. Is there a way to connect all the spans so they act as one, or is there a better way of going about having different colors for each letter in the word Google?

Here is my relevant html code:

            <td style="width: 100px; text-align: center; font-weight: bold; background: #88FAF8; border-color: black; letter-spacing: -2px">
                <a href="https://www.google.com/" style="text-decoration: none">
                    <span style="color: blue">G</span>                  
                    <span style="color: red">o</span>
                    <span style="color: yellow">o</span>
                    <span style="color: blue">g</span>
                    <span style="color: green">l</span>
                    <span style="color: red">e</span>
                </a>
            </td>

and here is my relevant CSS code:

    td:hover {background: #000000 !important;}

    a:hover {color: #2BFBFB !important;}

    span:hover {color: #2BFBFB !important;}

The a:hover is for other cells that don't have the span code in them. the span:hover is for the Google cell because a:hover doesn't work on it due to the spans, but like I've said, it doesn't work exactly like I would like it to.

Forgive me if my posting isn't formatted exactly right. This is my first post. I'll get it right.

Here's my code in action at JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Sharkie405/36aT7/

  • Welcome to SO :) In future, it's good to copy your code into a live editor like jsFiddle so that people can easily see your issue and edit your code, update it, and give it back to you. – Ming Feb 26 '14 at 4:05
4

You can use a:hover span to cover all the spans.

http://jsfiddle.net/r44zw/

a:hover span {
    color: #2BFBFB !important;
}
0

I'm not sure if you have learned classes yet, but this seems like a good case for it. You may want to add a class to you anchor tag (a tag) like so. class="google-link" or so you can see it with all the other code.

<a href="https://www.google.com/" class="google" style="text-decoration: none">
  <span style="color: blue">G</span>                  
  <span style="color: red">o</span>
  <span style="color: yellow">o</span>
  <span style="color: blue">g</span>
  <span style="color: green">l</span>
  <span style="color: red">e</span>
</a>

then you could add a .google:hover rule to your css

.google:hover span{
  color: #CCC !important;
}

adding the class will ensure if you ever have another span inside an a it won't get the google hover color.

Fiddle

Using !important inside the .google:hover span rule is necessary here to override the high precedence of inline styles. styles with !important have an added value that makes it higher than an inline-style. (More about specificity/precedence here, but keep in mind that's a somewhat advanced css topic.)

Edit:

Using !important is also somewhat bad practice and usually avoidable, although it is necessary in some cases. I would suggest avoiding it when possible, here is the way to do it without !important.

html (almost the same but now it has classes on each span).

<a href="https://www.google.com/" class="google" style="text-decoration: none">
  <span class="text-blue">G</span>                  
  <span class="text-red">o</span>
  <span class="text-yellow">o</span>
  <span class="text-blue">g</span>
  <span class="text-green">l</span>
  <span class="text-red">e</span>
</a>

css (a color added for each class)

.google:hover span{
  color: #CCC !important;
}

.text-blue {
    color: blue;
}

.text-red {
    color: red;
}

.text-yellow {
    color: yellow;
}

.text-green {
    color: green;
}

fiddle

  • I am familiar with classes. I tried your method and it also worked. Thank you for the information on the !important usages. There seems to be so many different ways to accomplish the same task, I'm often not sure which is the best route. It's always good to learn "best practices". – user3282051 Feb 26 '14 at 5:12
  • Hey, no problem glad I could give some insight, that article on specificity is definitely worth the read if you're going to be doing a lot of web development. Knowing specificity can save you a lot of headaches later on. You don't have to read it though since I said it's kind of advanced, but nothing too hard if you really want to learn it. – John Feb 26 '14 at 5:19

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