5

Suppose I have a structure with 50 integers. Is there a way to print out the value of every integer without having to manually type it out?

Example:

struct foo
{
  int one; //= 1
  int two; //= 2
  int three; //= 3
  ...
  int fifty; //= 50
};
int main()
{
    foo bar;
    int dream;
    cout << someThing(bar) //prints 12345...50
}

edit: I realize data like this should be stored in an array, this is just a hypothetical question. I am just curious if something like this exists.

  • You probably shouldn't have such a structure. That's what arrays are for. – user229044 Feb 26 '14 at 5:57
  • 3
    A structure with 50 ints in it? Rethink your design at once – Borgleader Feb 26 '14 at 5:58
  • How can you assign int one = 1; values to structure member directly? – Sumeet Feb 26 '14 at 6:00
  • I just typed the one = 1 thing quickly for the sake of the example. Its just suppose to give you an idea of what im asking about. – user3331346 Feb 26 '14 at 6:03
  • You can do this in higher level languages like C#. It's called reflection. – Mark Lakata Feb 26 '14 at 6:24
5

Well, you probably should have used arrays for such a thing in the first place since that would have made this task so much easier :-)

However, you could try casting the structure into an array and printing that out. There's no guarantee it will work in every implementation since it may be that the structure gets padded differently to an array, though I couldn't imagine why, but you may get lucky:

int *base = (int*)(&bar.one);
for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
    std::cout << "Item #" << (i + 1) << " = " << base[i] << '\n';

By way of example, the following program:

#include <iostream>

struct foo {
  int one, two, three, four;
};

int main() {
    foo bar;
    bar.one = 42;
    bar.two = 314159;
    bar.three = 271828;
    bar.four = 1414;

    int *base = (int*)(&bar.one);
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        std::cout << "Item #" << (i + 1) << " = " << base[i] << '\n';
    return 0;
}

outputs this:

Item #1 = 42
Item #2 = 314159
Item #3 = 271828
Item #4 = 1414

in my environment (Debian 7, g++ 4.7.2):

But, if you want to treat them like an array, they really should be an array.

  • Isn't it an error to initialize members of a structure in its definition? The code snippet in the question is plain wrong and should be corrected. – ajay Feb 26 '14 at 6:19
  • 1
    @ajay This works since C++11 and is a great way to give simple structs a predefined initialization without writing your own constructor. – Excelcius Feb 26 '14 at 6:24
  • I will change that, I meant the entire thing as sudo code. – user3331346 Feb 26 '14 at 6:24
  • Looks like it is valid in C++11 but is not in earlier C++ standards neither in C. The compiler emits the following warning without the switch -std=c++11: warning: non-static data member initializers only available with -std=c++11. – ajay Feb 26 '14 at 6:25
  • 1
    And it appears most of the comments above should have been made on the question. I'm not doing the C++11 init thing in this answer. – paxdiablo Feb 26 '14 at 6:31

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