12

I want to get sysdate -1 and sysdate -2 in variable and echo it. I am using below query which gives todays date as output.

#! /bin/bash
tm=$(date +%Y%d%m)
echo $tm

How to get yesterday and day before yesterdays date?

  • 1
    Do date -d"yesterday" and date -d"yesterday -1 day" work to you? – fedorqui Feb 26 '14 at 13:38
  • 1
    Please use YYYY-mm-dd xkcd.com/1179 – Gerry Feb 11 at 4:11
25

Here is another one way,

For yesterday,

date -d '-1 day' '+%Y%d%m'

For day before yesterday,

date -d '-2 day' '+%Y%d%m'
  • 2
    Note that the BSD date command (like macOS has) uses the -v switch for this. So date -v '-1d' '+%Y%d%m' would do what you want. – Graham Mitchell Apr 27 '18 at 16:18
  • Sane version (iso 8601): date -v '-1d' '+%Y-%m-%d' – Gerry Feb 11 at 4:10
8
  1. Yesterday date

    YES_DAT=$(date --date=' 1 days ago' '+%Y%d%m')
    
  2. Day before yesterdays date

    DAY_YES_DAT=$(date --date=' 2 days ago' '+%Y%d%m')
    

For any date you can use below one default it take 1 days. If its passing value that day before it take

ANY_YES_DAT=$(date --date=' $1 days ago' '+%Y%d%m')
2

You can get the yesterday date by this:

date -d "yesterday 13:00 " '+%Y-%m-%d'

and day before yesterday by this:-

date -d "yesterday-1 13:00 " '+%Y-%m-%d'
  • yesterday-1 works for you? – Nadine Feb 12 '15 at 11:05
  • yesterday-1 and yesterday -1 not working in RHEL 7.1, only date -d "yesterday -1 day" – Betlista Aug 30 '18 at 13:11
1

For older versions of BSD date (on old versions of macOS for example) which don't provide a -v option, you can get yesterdays date by subtracting 86400 seconds (seconds in a day) from the current epoch.

date -r $(( $(date '+%s') - 86400 ))

Obviously, you can subtract 2 * 86400 away for the day for yesterday etc.

Edit: Add reference to old macOS versions.

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