15

I have following scala code

def message(attachmentId: UUID) : URI = {
  var r : mutable.MutableList[BasicTemplate] = new mutable.MutableList[BasicTemplate]
  val t : Type = new TypeToken[Iterable[BasicTemplate]](){}.getType()
  val m : String = "[{\"basicTemplate\":\"TEMPLATE\",\"baseline\":\"DEMO\",\"identifier\":\"0599999999\"}]"

  r = new Gson().fromJson(m, t)
  Console.println(r.head.getBasicTemplateName)

  URI.create("http://google.com")
}

And it gives me following compilation error:

[ERROR] Class1.scala:402: error: dead code following this construct
[ERROR] r = new Gson().fromJson(m, t)

Any ideas why I get this error are highly appreciated!

  • You don't need to specify the type after declaring variables. – wheaties Feb 26 '14 at 15:43
  • May be it is caused by the 'r' re-assignment. More info - issues.scala-lang.org/browse/SI-6339 – fiction Feb 26 '14 at 15:47
  • I don't know your error, but you create a list in line "var r ... = new ..., then you throw that list away in line r = new Gson(). Why don't you use val r = new Gson()... – Arne Feb 26 '14 at 15:48
  • @wheaties: I've tried to remove types and it didn't help – AVE Feb 26 '14 at 15:58
  • @Arne: I've also tried to use val r = new Gson().. and it still gives the same error. Any other ideas? – AVE Feb 26 '14 at 15:59
32

Look at the signature of fromJson:

public <T> T fromJson(String json, Type typeOfT)

As you can see, this method has type parameter T, but you called it without specifying it. This way, type inferencer understood it as new Gson().fromJson[Nothing](m, t) and the entire expression was assigned the type Nothing.

In Scala, Nothing is a bottom type that is a subtype of all types and has no values. Methods that return Nothing are guaranteed to never return, either because they always throw an exception, fall into infinite loop, forcibly terminate the program (e.g. sys.exit()), etc. In your case, the fromJson call will cause a ClassCastException to be thrown when the JVM tries to cast its result to Nothing. Therefore, everything after that call is a dead code.

This type inference behaviour is different from Java, which would normally infer new Gson().<Object>fromJson(m, t) here.

  • Thank you very much for your comment, I'm very new to Scala, could you please suggest what is the correct way of calling this fromJson method in Scala? I thought Scala should understand that the return type should be the same as type of variable 'r' – AVE Feb 26 '14 at 23:35
  • 1
    @AVE I guess you need to specify your type explicitly: new Gson().fromJson[mutable.MutableList[BasicTemplate]](m, t) – ghik Feb 26 '14 at 23:36
  • 1
    @AVE Although I must admit that the more I think about this, the more I'm starting to suspect that it's a bug. – ghik Feb 26 '14 at 23:42
  • Thanks again, your suggestion worked well – AVE Feb 27 '14 at 12:46
  • 1
    @ghik Sorry for the late post, but I just wanted to correct something in your answer. Nothing is actually a valid, required return type for any function that never returns, as well as being the type of a throw expression. (For example, scala.sys.exit() returns Nothing.) If a function doesn't return, then anything that follows a call to it will never execute, hence it is dead code. Your comment that the compiler thinks that your assignment will always throw an exception is not actually correct. – Mike Allen Jan 19 '17 at 15:06

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