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I am finding it difficult to model polymorphism and instances in UML.

For example if i have an abstract, parent or base class called "Bird", i would imagine that you could say that "duck" is one form of polymorphism but it could also be an instance.

Maybe, i'm confusing where one starts and ends. Are there visual examples of these?

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    It's fine to vote my question down but if you don't tell me why, i won't know why and i may not be able to correct my question. – PeanutsMonkey Feb 26 '14 at 18:49
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    A class diagram doesn't capture instances. A Duck might be - is - a type of Bird, and Mr. McQuack might be a particular Duck. Of course, one might choose to not model Ducks as separate relations, depending upon the scope/task - basically, a small finite set of archetypes can be modeled as classes while an unbound collection of data can only be represented by "instances" of said relations. – user2864740 Feb 26 '14 at 18:54
  • @user2864740 Class diagram hasn't instances as elements, but it can speak about them indirectly - abstract class or interface has no instances and concrete class has them. – Gangnus Feb 27 '14 at 13:17
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It is simple enough.

If one concrete class Cage has reference to abstract class Bird, and concrete classes Woodpecker and Canary are derived from the last, this is polymorphism. You'll have to choose what bird really will sit in the cage, for abstract class has no instances. The same for Interface.

enter image description here

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  • Sorry. I don't quite follow. So you mean to say that Canary is not an instance of Bird but rather it represents polymorphism. So when is it an instance? My understanding is that Canary would be an instance and its behaviour e.g. sound would be polymorphism. – PeanutsMonkey Feb 27 '14 at 16:33
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    @PeanutsMonkey Canary is not instance of anything, it is the class. There are NO instances here. You see only classes that can or cannot have instances. Canary is derived from abstract class Bird. And class Canary can have instances - those little yellow singing beasties. – Gangnus Feb 27 '14 at 19:26
  • Thanks Gangnus. So it's generalization or specialization then. How does this equate to instances and polymorphism? – PeanutsMonkey Mar 3 '14 at 18:04
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    @PeanutsMonkey Bird can't have instances, but Cage has Bird, so it MUST be substituted for Canary or Woodpecker for getting an instance. THAT is polymorphysm. – Gangnus Mar 3 '14 at 20:14
  • @PeanutsMonkey So, you have a class Cage, the content of which can be Canary XOR Woodpecker. – Gangnus Mar 3 '14 at 20:37
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The question of inheritance vs instance depends on functionality. If there are any differences in your data model between ducks and other types of birds then you would want a Duck class that inherits from Bird. Otherwise you're looking at your duck simply as an instance of Bird.

Polymorphism only comes into play when you are calling the same method across different Bird implementations.

For UML modeling here are a couple points to help you out.

This book is required reading for many Software Engineeing courses and has served me well for many years.

http://www.amazon.com/UML-Distilled-Standard-Modeling-Language/dp/0321193687

This blog does a pretty good job of showing the different use cases and the corresponding OOP models. http://usna86-techbits.blogspot.com/2012/11/uml-class-diagram-relationships.html

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  • Thanks Babak. Can you give examples of polymorphism in the examples you cited of inheritance and instance? – PeanutsMonkey Feb 26 '14 at 19:12
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First, I think that your question is how to model polymorphism. To illustrate, see these Java codes:

Drawable.java

package examples.simple.model;

public interface Drawable {
    public void draw();
}

Shape.java

package examples.simple.model;

public abstract class Shape  implements Drawable {
    private Point center;

    public Point getCenter() {
        return center;
    }

    public void setCenter(Point center) {
        this.center = center;
    }
}

Rectangle.java

package examples.simple.model;

public class Rectangle extends Shape {
    public void draw() {
        System.out.println("Drawing a rectangle....");
    }
}

Circle.java

package examples.simple.model;

public class Circle extends Shape {
    public void draw() {
        System.out.println("Drawing a circle....");
    }
}

Line.java

package examples.simple.model;

public class Line implements Drawable{
    public void draw() {
        System.out.println("Drawing a line");
    }
}

Plotter.java

package examples.simple.client;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

import examples.simple.model.Circle;
import examples.simple.model.Drawable;
import examples.simple.model.Rectangle;
import examples.simple.model.Shape;
import examples.simple.model.Line;

class Plotter {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Drawable> drawables = new ArrayList<Drawable>();

        Shape s = new Circle();
        drawables.add(s);

        s = new Rectangle();
        drawables.add(s);

        Line l = new Line();
        drawables.add(l);

        for (Drawable drawable : drawables) {
            drawable.draw();
        }
    }
}

These are a classical example of polymorphism. The class diagram is

enter image description here

In this situation, using a sequence diagram, the polymorphic invocations are modeled by multiples scenarios controlled by the guard conditions. Therefore, for each polymorphic scenario, the dynamic binding (polymorphic invocation) is represented for a "scenario box". So, this is a single model (sequence diagram) to show polymorphic invocations.

Sequence Diagram to represent polymorphic scenarios

Finally, representing polymorphic invocations using UML is actually a challenge.

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