0

Interesting thought question for you guys. Given an array of length n, if I were to pick two random indexes in this array, a and b on average how far apart would they be? As in how many steps would I have to take to walk from a to b. There are no restrictions so there's a chance I pick the same index for both, and there's a chance a and b are at opposite ends of the array.

I've thought about this for a while, my initial idea being they're on average n/2(ish) apart, but I think this hunch is incorrect. An index chosen in the center of the array at most would have to walk n/2 places to find its corresponding second choice, whereas only at the ends of the array would the second choice ever be around n distance away.

Thanks!

  • True but I'm curious if there's a way to prove or explain this probability (apparently it's n/3 in practice) – matty-d Feb 27 '14 at 1:50
  • 4
    Isn't this a maths question smuggled onto Stackoverflow by framing it in terms of an array? – stovroz Feb 27 '14 at 1:55
  • 2
    1) are math and algorithms questions that different? 2) this is an algorithms homework problem 3) stack overflow has an algorithms tag so I used it. – matty-d Feb 27 '14 at 1:59
  • @stovroz If the question were about continuous intervals of real numbers, it would clearly be for math.stackexchange.com. But since it is a discrete array, I think it could go either way. – Teepeemm Feb 27 '14 at 5:44
  • 3
    I could see this as being closed for being off topic. But I don't understand "unclear what you're asking". There's four answers that interpret the question the exact same way. And I can prove that @stovroz 's answer is correct. – Teepeemm Feb 27 '14 at 5:56
5

After scribbling some grids of possible distances for the first few values of n, I think the exact result is in fact given by:

f(n) = (n² - 1) / 3n
  • 1
    +1 This is the only answer that matches what I'm seeing. In addition, the probability of any specific interval k is 2(n-k) / n^2. – Geobits Feb 27 '14 at 3:48
  • This answer is correct. I'd post a rigorous derivation of it if the question hadn't been placed on-hold. – pjs Feb 27 '14 at 20:20
2

Choosing two places in an array is equivalent to splitting the array up into 3 sections. The average size of each of those sections will be n/3 so the average distance between the two points is also n/3.

  • This sounds very reasonable to me. – Philippe Signoret Feb 27 '14 at 2:07
  • 1
    Or rather it tends to n/3. – stovroz Feb 27 '14 at 2:08
  • Agreed, this only works over large n (like take n == 4 it doesn't work). But I think it's elegant and solves it for me. – matty-d Feb 27 '14 at 2:10
  • 1
    @PhilippeSignoret No, it's not evenly distributed. For example, there are n ways to get a distance of 0, while there are only ever 2 ways to get a distance of n-1 – Geobits Feb 27 '14 at 2:45
  • You're absolutely right. I should think, then speak. :) Edit: dumb comment removed, I don't want to confuse people, since it was dead wrong. – Philippe Signoret Feb 27 '14 at 2:47
1

Using a monte carlo method in python:

from collections import defaultdict
import random

sample = [abs(random.choice(range(0,10)) - random.choice(range(0,10))) for i in range(0,10000)]

avg = float(sum(sample) / len(sample))
print ("Average: %f" % avg)

freq = defaultdict(int)
for s in sample:
    freq[s] += 1

scale = 40.0 / max(freq.values())
for i in range(0,10):
    print ("%d : %s" % (i, "#" * int(freq[i] * scale)))

Output:

Average: 3.293700
0 : ######################
1 : ########################################
2 : ####################################
3 : ###############################
4 : ##########################
5 : ######################
6 : #################
7 : #############
8 : #########
9 : ####

So, looks like it's n/3 - but it's not evenly distributed.

  • Any ideas as to why? – matty-d Feb 27 '14 at 1:52
  • Does my answer below make sense? Twas inspired by your research. – matty-d Feb 27 '14 at 1:53
  • It would be very interesting to try this again without taking the absolute value of the difference, giving a range of (-n,n) (exclusive). I think you'll get something closer to a gaussian distribution. – beaker Feb 27 '14 at 3:44
  • @beaker It's not Gaussian, it's triangular. Think of it as an n by n matrix where the row's are the index of the first number and the columns are the index of the second. Put |i-j| as the entries at location (i,j), each of which occurs with probability 1/n<sup>2</sup>. You get n zeros down the main diagonal, n-1 ones to either side of the main diagonal for a total of 2(n-1) ones, 2(n-2) twos two away from the diag, etc. Eliminate the absolute value => one side of the diagonal is positive, the other is negative, and the probabilities diminish linearly with the difference => triangle. – pjs Feb 27 '14 at 18:39
1

There is an easy way to know: for all the couples (a, b), computer their distance. Knowing that all the couples (a, b) have the same probability of appearance, you will just need to do the average of those distances in order to answer your question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.