18

What is this? I can't find help by using ?. (Sorry for being dumb)

> 1%*%1
     [,1]
[1,]    1
> 10%*%10
     [,1]
[1,]  100
> c(1:2)%*%c(1:2)
     [,1]
[1,]    5
  • 14
    try putting it in quotes ?'%*%' – JeremyS Feb 27 '14 at 6:16
16

It's a matrix multiplication operator!

From the documentation:

Description:

Multiplies two matrices, if they are conformable. If one argument is a vector, it will be promoted to either a row or column matrix to make the two arguments conformable. If both are vectors of the same length, it will return the inner product (as a matrix).

Usage:

x %*% y

Arguments:

x, y    numeric or complex matrices or vectors

6
> c(1,2,3) %*% c(4,5,6)
     [,1]
[1,]   32
> c(1,2,3) * c(4,5,6)
[1]  4 10 18

Like MadSeb said, it is the matrix multiplication operator. If you give it two vectors, it will coerce them to (logical) 1-row & a 1-col matrix and multiply them.

It is also the inner (or dot) product between two vectors and finds wide usage in linear algebra, computational geometry and a host of other applications.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dot_product

BTW, the vectors have to be in the same space (same number of dimensions)

> c(1,2,3) %*% c(4,5,6,7)
Error in c(1, 2, 3) %*% c(4, 5, 6, 7) : non-conformable arguments
1

I created a question 'What is the calculation behind the %*% operator in R?' which was marked as a duplicate of this question. The %*% operator is used to multiply two matrices. I didn't realise 'matrix multiplication' was an established algebraic method so it was useful to learn the underlying calculation, not yet described explicitly in other answers here. Passing on useful links from comments in the duplicate question

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matrix_multiplication#Definition

http://matrixmultiplication.xyz/

From Matrix Multiplication Wikipedia Page

0

This operator is used to multiply a matrix with its transpose.

M = matrix( c(2,6,5,1,10,4), nrow = 2,ncol = 3,byrow = TRUE)

t = M %*% t(M)

print(t)

from tutorialspoints

  • As other answers already state, it is used to multiply any two matrices. Doesn't matter if one is a transpose, regardless of what your tutorial site says. – Gregor - reinstate Monica Apr 16 '19 at 13:38
  • > M = matrix(c(3,2,5,3,4,5),3, 2) > M [,1] [,2] [1,] 3 3 [2,] 2 4 [3,] 5 5 > M %*% M Error in M %*% M : non-conformable arguments > M %*% t(M) [,1] [,2] [,3] [1,] 18 18 30 [2,] 18 20 30 [3,] 30 30 50 I think the transpose matters if the matrix is multiplied by itself, otherwise the %*% produces an error stackoverflow.com/questions/33237043/… – Roasty247 Apr 16 '19 at 13:52
  • Dimensions must conform for matrix multiplication---this means the number of columns of the first matrix must equal the number of rows of the second matrix. This is always the case for a transpose, but the transpose is not necessary. Try m1 = matrix(1:4, ncol = 2) and m2 = matrix(1:100, nrow = 2). m1 %*% m2 works just fine. – Gregor - reinstate Monica Apr 16 '19 at 15:53
  • I'd recommend you do a bit of reading. For example, here's the wikipedia page on matrix multiplication. You don't have to read far---the 4th sentence gives the conformable arguments requirement. You can also read the Definition section, and see that the term transpose is not used in the definition. – Gregor - reinstate Monica Apr 16 '19 at 15:57

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