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I am in the process of converting an initially written C code in a CUDA parallelized one. Still a newbie, I converted most parts of the code into CUDA but some of my kernels aren't doing the job correctly.

Here is my kernel:

__global__ void kernel(long int *neighbour, double *f, double *r, double *b, double *fn, double *rn, double *bn, int nfluidsite){

int ns = blockDim.x * blockIdx.x + threadIdx.x;

    if(ns<nfluidsite)
 {
  double tempr = r[ns];
  double tempb = b[ns];
  rn[ns]=tempr;
  bn[ns]=tempb;
  for(int q=1;q<Q;++q)
  {  
  double confr=r[q*NSITE+ns];
  double confb=b[q*NSITE+ns];
  __syncthreads();
  int ns1=neighbour[q*NTOTAL+ns];
  __syncthreads();
  rn[q*NSITE+ns1]=confr;
  bn[q*NSITE+ns1]=confb;
  }
 }

if(ns<NSITE)
 {
  for(int q=0;q<Q;++q)
  {
      double rqns = rn[q*NSITE+ns];
      double bqns = bn[q*NSITE+ns];
  __syncthreads();
  r[q*NSITE+ns]=rqns;
  b[q*NSITE+ns]=bqns;
  f[q*NSITE+ns]=rqns+bqns;
  }
 }

}

So, this code is working fine (though it is not optimized at all), but I also want to parallelize the inner for loop on q. So, I went like this:

    int ns = blockIdx.x;
    int q = threadIdx.x;

And I launched my kernel as follows:

blocksPerGrid = NSITE;
threadsPerBlock = Q;
kernel<<<blocksPerGrid,threadsPerBlock>>>(neighbourCu, fCu, rCu, bCu, fnCu, rnCu, bnCu, nfluidsite);

And it doesn't work at all, CUDA does not return any errors but the operations on the arrays are somewhat random... I added the __syncthreads() commands in the fully parallelized version but it did not solve the discrepancies.

Also, I don't why but if I use more than 1024 threads, the instructions in my kernels are also running random...

Well I have been puzzled two weeks, if anyone is seeing what I need to do, please give me a hint!

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I think you don't need __syncthreads(); where you have put them, you are assigning and reading thread local (register or local memory) variables.

On the other side for sure you need to invoke __threadfence(); before the block of code starting with:

if(ns<NSITE) {
  ...
}

The offending statements are:

  rn[q*NSITE+ns1]=confr;
  bn[q*NSITE+ns1]=confb;

before and:

  double rqns = rn[q*NSITE+ns];
  double bqns = bn[q*NSITE+ns];

after.

Since one thread writes to some global memory and a different one read from it, you need to put in the middle at least both:

__threadfence();
__syncthreads();

(more information here). This will work correctly only if rn and bn are modified by threads within the same block. If it happens that even threads outside the block can modify them, that's not enough: you need the guarantee that all blocks have reached that point before proceeding (note: __syncthreads() guarantee only that threads within the same block have reached that point - it's a block-local barrier). You have three options:

  1. split the kernel in two different kernels in that point - separate kernel invocations are implicitly synchronized. I would start with this and see whether it works.

  2. If NSITE is just one thread block, as it seems, you can just follow the example of the global sum here again: only the last block will do it - all the rest will just skip.

  3. implement a global barrier (that's not an easy task - but if you google around, you'll find good references) in that point.

  • Thanks! I used the first option (the simplest one) and it worked. It also solved my threads per block number limit issue. I'll keep in mind the other options in case it is needed elsewhere. – Seif Feb 27 '14 at 14:24

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