11

This is what I'd like to do in C++11: given two time points (such as a timing class) as std::chrono::steady_clock::now(), print their time difference elegantly, for instance:

1 day 4 hours 3 minutes 45 seconds

or

32 minutes 54 seconds 345 milliseconds

Please note that I'm not interested in simply using put_time, since I want to print starting from the most significant unit of time. I know, it's a solution to just print the difference, but it's not pretty: I'm looking for an elegant solution :)

Cheers!

4
  • What solution do you have right now? – RedX Feb 27 '14 at 9:24
  • Using a custom put_time formatting, based on a subsequent division by days, hours, ..., kinda like @Simple wrote. But I'm hoping to find something prettier! :) – senseiwa Feb 27 '14 at 10:03
  • @senseiwa I don't get it. " I'm not interested in simply using put_time, since I want to print starting from the most significant unit of time." Why can't you use put_time to start from the most significant unit of time? I am afraid I am missing a point. – Ali Feb 27 '14 at 16:11
  • Because I'd like to generalize the printing, and though it is weird, I'd like to avoid subsequent subtractions in order to find the most significant unit that is non zero. – senseiwa Mar 6 '14 at 14:58
5

Duration can do arithmetic.

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

int main(){
    using namespace std::chrono;
    using day_t = duration<long, std::ratio<3600 * 24>>;
    auto start = system_clock::now();
    std::this_thread::sleep_for(seconds(1));
    auto end = system_clock::now();
    auto dur = end - start;
    auto d = duration_cast<day_t>(dur);
    auto h = duration_cast<hours>(dur -= d);
    auto m = duration_cast<minutes>(dur -= h);
    auto s = duration_cast<seconds>(dur -= m);
    auto ms = duration_cast<seconds>(dur -= s);
    std::cout << d.count() << " days, "
        << h.count() << " hours, "
        << m.count() << " minutes, "
        << s.count() << " seconds, "
        << ms.count() << " milliseconds\n";

    return 0;
}

Output:

enter image description here

Possible duplicate: Extract year/month/day etc. from std::chrono::time_point in C++

3
template<typename T>
void print_time_diff(std::ostream& out, T prior, T latter)
{
    namespace sc = std::chrono;
    auto diff = sc::duration_cast<sc::milliseconds>(latter - prior).count();
    auto const msecs = diff % 1000;
    diff /= 1000;
    auto const secs = diff % 60;
    diff /= 60;
    auto const mins = diff % 60;
    diff /= 60;
    auto const hours = diff % 24;
    diff /= 24;
    auto const days = diff;

    bool printed_earlier = false;
    if (days >= 1) {
        printed_earlier = true;
        out << days << (1 != days ? " days" : " day") << ' ';
    }
    if (printed_earlier || hours >= 1) {
        printed_earlier = true;
        out << hours << (1 != hours ? " hours" : " hour") << ' ';
    }
    if (printed_earlier || mins >= 1) {
        printed_earlier = true;
        out << mins << (1 != mins ? " minutes" : " minute") << ' ';
    }
    if (printed_earlier || secs >= 1) {
        printed_earlier = true;
        out << secs << (1 != secs ? " seconds" : " second") << ' ';
    }
    if (printed_earlier || msecs >= 1) {
        printed_earlier = true;
        out << msecs << (1 != msecs ? " milliseconds" : " millisecond");
    }
}

http://ideone.com/bBNHQp

1
  • Thanks, this is very similar to the solution I'm using right now. I was wondering if there is a more coincise way of expressing divisions. For instance, printing file sizes is quite coincise by using log10 and finding the maximum unit of measure. I don't know if there is a clever way of transposing this to time... – senseiwa Feb 27 '14 at 10:08
3

Here's an easily extensible solution using variadic templates and recursion. It defines ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const duration&) for ease of use.

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

using day_t = std::chrono::duration<long long, std::ratio<3600 * 24>>;

template<typename> struct duration_traits {};

#define DURATION_TRAITS(Duration, Singular, Plural) \
template<> struct duration_traits<Duration> { \
    constexpr static const char* singular = Singular; \
    constexpr static const char* plural = Plural; \
}

DURATION_TRAITS(std::chrono::milliseconds, "millisecond", "milliseconds");
DURATION_TRAITS(std::chrono::seconds, "second", "seconds");
DURATION_TRAITS(std::chrono::minutes, "minute", "minutes");
DURATION_TRAITS(std::chrono::hours, "hour", "hours");
DURATION_TRAITS(day_t, "day", "days");

using divisions = std::tuple<std::chrono::milliseconds, 
                             std::chrono::seconds, 
                             std::chrono::minutes, 
                             std::chrono::hours, 
                             day_t>;

namespace detail {
template<typename...> struct print_duration_impl_ {};

template<typename Head, typename... Tail>
struct print_duration_impl_<Head, Tail...> {
    template <typename Duration>
    static bool print(std::ostream& os, Duration& dur) {
        const auto started_printing = print_duration_impl_<Tail...>::print(os, dur);

        const auto n = std::chrono::duration_cast<Head>(dur);
        const auto count = n.count();

        if (count == 0) {
            return started_printing;
        }

        if (started_printing) {
            os << ' ';
        }

        using traits = duration_traits<Head>;
        os << count << ' ' << (count == 1 ? traits::singular : traits::plural);
        dur -= n;

        return true;
    }
};

template<>
struct print_duration_impl_<> {
    template <typename Duration>
    static bool print(std::ostream& os, Duration& dur) {
        return false;
    }
};

template<typename...> struct print_duration {};

template<typename... Args>
struct print_duration<std::tuple<Args...>> {
    template<typename Duration>
    static void print(std::ostream& os, Duration dur) {
        print_duration_impl_<Args...>::print(os, dur);
    }
};
}

template<typename Rep, typename Period>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const std::chrono::duration<Rep, Period>& dur) {
    detail::print_duration<divisions>::print(os, dur);
    return os;
}

New durations are added by specializing duration_traits and inserting the type at the correct position in divisions. For example, adding a 10 ms jiffy type would involve:

using jiffy_t = std::chrono::duration<long long, std::centi>;
DURATION_TRAITS(jiffy_t, "jiffy", "jiffies");

using divisions = std::tuple<std::chrono::milliseconds, 
                             jiffy_t,
                             std::chrono::seconds, 
                             std::chrono::minutes, 
                             std::chrono::hours, 
                             day_t>;

Not bad for three lines of code!

Live example on ideone.com.

1
  • 1
    Man, this is very interesting! – senseiwa Mar 6 '14 at 14:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.