5

I'm writing a custom Angular filter that randomly capitalizes the input passed to it.

Here's the code:

angular.module('textFilters', []).filter('goBananas', function() {
  return function(input) {

    var str = input;
    var strlen = str.length;

    while(strlen--) if(Math.round(Math.random())) {
      str = str.substr(0,strlen) + str.charAt(strlen).toUpperCase() + str.substr(strlen+1);
    }

    return str;
  };
});

I call it in my view like so:

    <a class='menu_button_news menu_button' ng-href='#/news'>
        {{"News" | goBananas}}
    </a>

It works, but in my console I'm seeing a rootScope:infdig (infinite digest) loop.

I'm having some trouble understanding why this is happening and what I can do to resolve it. If I understand correctly, this is due to the fact that there are more than 5 digest actions called by this function. But the input is only called once by the filter, right?

Any help appreciated.

  • 1
    Did you ever check out my answer? It it's not helpful at all, I'd like to delete it. However, I feel that it's very good information that we should be memoizing such filters to keep the data transformation separate from the logic that fixes the infinite digest error. The code is so much cleaner that way. I'd really appreciate your feedback. Note my solution doesn't involve changing your code, which works fine. – m59 Oct 3 '14 at 22:12
4

Since digest will continue to run until consistent state of the model will be reached or 10 iterations will run, you need your own algorithm to generate pseudo-random numbers that will return the same numbers for the same strings in order to avoid infinite digest loop. It will be good if algorithm will use character value, character position and some configurable seed to generate numbers. Avoid using date/time parameters in such algorithm. Here is one of possible solutions:

HTML

<h1>{{ 'Hello Plunker!' | goBananas:17 }}</h1> 

JavaScript

angular.module('textFilters', []).
  filter('goBananas', function() {
    return function(input, seed) {
      seed = seed || 1;
      (input = input.split('')).forEach(function(c, i, arr) {
        arr[i] = c[(c.charCodeAt(0) + i + Math.round(seed / 3)) % 2 ? 'toUpperCase' : 'toLowerCase']();
      });
      return input.join('');
    }
  });

You can play with seed parameter to change a bit an algorithm. For example it may be $index of ngRepeat

Plunker: http://plnkr.co/edit/oBSGQjVZjhaIMWNrPXRh?p=preview

  • Great, this works a charm. Wouldn't it just be possible to define $scope.random = Math.random()*10; in the controller and use the filter in the view as {{'Hey there' | goBananas:random}} ? – Squrler Feb 27 '14 at 13:16
  • @Squrler Yes, just take a look at this plunk plnkr.co/edit/ee0mRPMhfFsDZMzZv9iE?p=preview – Vadim Feb 27 '14 at 13:21
  • Awesome, that did the trick. Thanks @Vadim – Squrler Feb 27 '14 at 13:59
6

The problem is that the filter will produce a new result every time it is called, and Angular will call it more than once to ensure that the value is done changing, which it never is. For example, if you use the uppercase filter on the word 'stuff' then the result is 'STUFF'. When Angular calls the filter again, the result is 'STUFF' again, so the digest cycle can end. Contrast that with a filter that returns Math.random(), for example.

The technical solution is to apply the transformation in the controller rather than in the view. However, I do prefer to transform data in the view with filters, even if the filter applies an unstable transformation (returns differently each time) like yours.

In most cases, an unstable filter can be fixed by memoizing the filter function. Underscore and lodash have a memoize function included. You would just wrap that around the filter function like this:

.filter('myFilter', function() {
  return _memoize(function(input) {
    // your filter logic
    return result;
  });
});
  • can you please direct me what is wrong here- stackoverflow.com/questions/30435382/… – codebased May 25 '15 at 12:16
  • 1
    @codebased my answer here explains the problem you're having and the easiest solution. Wrap your filter in a memoize function. – m59 May 25 '15 at 16:31
0

An alternative, if you want the behaviour to be truly random, is to do deal with the randomness only once during linking by creating a seed, and then use a seeded random number generator in the actual filter:

angular.module('textFilters', []).filter('goBananas', function() {
  var seed = Math.random()
  var rnd = function () {
    var x = Math.sin(seed++) * 10000;
    return x - Math.floor(x);
  }

  return function(input) {

    var str = input;
    var strlen = str.length;

    while(strlen--) if(Math.round(rnd())) {
      str = str.substr(0,strlen) + str.charAt(strlen).toUpperCase() + str.substr(strlen+1);
    }

    return str;
  };
});

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