93

Xunit has a nice feature: you can create one test with a Theory attribute and put data in InlineData attributes, and xUnit will generate many tests, and test them all.

I want to have something like this, but the parameters to my method are not 'simple data' (like string, int, double), but a list of my class:

public static void WriteReportsToMemoryStream(
    IEnumerable<MyCustomClass> listReport,
    MemoryStream ms,
    StreamWriter writer) { ... }
131

There are many xxxxData attributes in XUnit. Check out for example the PropertyData attribute.

You can implement a property that returns IEnumerable<object[]>. Each object[] that this method generates will be then "unpacked" as a parameters for a single call to your [Theory] method.

Another option is ClassData, which works the same, but allows to easily share the 'generators' between tests in different classes/namespaces, and also separates the 'data generators' from the actual test methods.

See i.e. these examples from here:

PropertyData Example

public class StringTests2
{
    [Theory, PropertyData(nameof(SplitCountData))]
    public void SplitCount(string input, int expectedCount)
    {
        var actualCount = input.Split(' ').Count();
        Assert.Equal(expectedCount, actualCount);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<object[]> SplitCountData
    {
        get
        {
            // Or this could read from a file. :)
            return new[]
            {
                new object[] { "xUnit", 1 },
                new object[] { "is fun", 2 },
                new object[] { "to test with", 3 }
            };
        }
    }
}

ClassData Example

public class StringTests3
{
    [Theory, ClassData(typeof(IndexOfData))]
    public void IndexOf(string input, char letter, int expected)
    {
        var actual = input.IndexOf(letter);
        Assert.Equal(expected, actual);
    }
}

public class IndexOfData : IEnumerable<object[]>
{
    private readonly List<object[]> _data = new List<object[]>
    {
        new object[] { "hello world", 'w', 6 },
        new object[] { "goodnight moon", 'w', -1 }
    };

    public IEnumerator<object[]> GetEnumerator()
    { return _data.GetEnumerator(); }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    { return GetEnumerator(); }
}
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  • @dcastro: yeah, I'm actually searching for some on original xunit docs – quetzalcoatl Feb 28 '14 at 11:36
  • 2
    @Nick: I agree that's similar to PropertyData, but also, you have pointed out the reason for it: static. That's exactly why I wouldn't. ClassData is when you want to escape from statics. By doing so, you can reuse (i.e. nest) the generators easier. – quetzalcoatl Aug 29 '14 at 8:02
  • 1
    Any ideas what happened with ClassData? I canõt find it in xUnit2.0, for now, I am using MemberData with static method, which creates new instance of class, and returns that. – Erti-Chris Eelmaa May 16 '15 at 23:43
  • 13
    @Erti, use [MemberData("{static member}", MemberType = typeof(MyClass))] to replace ClassData attribute. – Junle Li Jun 4 '15 at 16:10
  • 6
    As of C#6 it'd recommended to use the nameof keyword instead of hardcoding a property name (breaks easily but silently). – sara Mar 24 '16 at 12:45
38

To update @Quetzalcoatl's answer: The attribute [PropertyData] has been superseded by [MemberData] which takes as argument the string name of any static method, field, or property that returns an IEnumerable<object[]>. (I find it particularly nice to have an iterator method that can actually calculate test cases one at a time, yielding them up as they're computed.)

Each element in the sequence returned by the enumerator is an object[] and each array must be the same length and that length must be the number of arguments to your test case (annotated with the attribute [MemberData] and each element must have the same type as the corresponding method parameter. (Or maybe they can be convertible types, I don't know.)

(See release notes for xUnit.net March 2014 and the actual patch with example code.)

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  • 2
    @davidbak The codplex is gone. The link is not working – Kishan Vaishnav Nov 28 '19 at 6:06
11

Creating anonymous object arrays is not the easiest way to construct the data so I used this pattern in my project

First define some reusable, shared classes

//http://stackoverflow.com/questions/22093843
public interface ITheoryDatum
{
    object[] ToParameterArray();
}

public abstract class TheoryDatum : ITheoryDatum
{
    public abstract object[] ToParameterArray();

    public static ITheoryDatum Factory<TSystemUnderTest, TExpectedOutput>(TSystemUnderTest sut, TExpectedOutput expectedOutput, string description)
    {
        var datum= new TheoryDatum<TSystemUnderTest, TExpectedOutput>();
        datum.SystemUnderTest = sut;
        datum.Description = description;
        datum.ExpectedOutput = expectedOutput;
        return datum;
    }
}

public class TheoryDatum<TSystemUnderTest, TExecptedOutput> : TheoryDatum
{
    public TSystemUnderTest SystemUnderTest { get; set; }

    public string Description { get; set; }

    public TExpectedOutput ExpectedOutput { get; set; }

    public override object[] ToParameterArray()
    {
        var output = new object[3];
        output[0] = SystemUnderTest;
        output[1] = ExpectedOutput;
        output[2] = Description;
        return output;
    }

}

Now your individual test and member data is easier to write and cleaner...

public class IngredientTests : TestBase
{
    [Theory]
    [MemberData(nameof(IsValidData))]
    public void IsValid(Ingredient ingredient, bool expectedResult, string testDescription)
    {
        Assert.True(ingredient.IsValid == expectedResult, testDescription);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<object[]> IsValidData
    {
        get
        {
            var food = new Food();
            var quantity = new Quantity();
            var data= new List<ITheoryDatum>();

            data.Add(TheoryDatum.Factory(new Ingredient { Food = food }                       , false, "Quantity missing"));
            data.Add(TheoryDatum.Factory(new Ingredient { Quantity = quantity }               , false, "Food missing"));
            data.Add(TheoryDatum.Factory(new Ingredient { Quantity = quantity, Food = food }  , true,  "Valid"));

            return data.ConvertAll(d => d.ToParameterArray());
        }
    }
}

The string Description property is to throw yourself a bone when one of your many test cases fail

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  • 1
    I like this; it has some real potential for a very complex object I have to validate the validations on 90+ properties. I can pass in a simple JSON object, deserialize it, and generate the data for a test iteration. Good job. – Gustyn Dec 20 '16 at 10:56
  • 1
    aren't the parameters for the IsValid Testmethod mixed up - shouldn't it be IsValid(ingrediant, exprectedResult, testDescription)? – pastacool Mar 18 at 15:31
  • 1
    thanks - have fixed this – fiat Mar 19 at 10:17
9

Suppose that we have a complex Car class that has a Manufacturer class:

public class Car
{
     public int Id { get; set; }
     public long Price { get; set; }
     public Manufacturer Manufacturer { get; set; }
}
public class Manufacturer
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Country { get; set; }
}

We're going to fill and pass the Car class to a Theory test.

So create a 'CarClassData' class that returns an instance of the Car class like below:

public class CarClassData : IEnumerable<object[]>
    {
        public IEnumerator<object[]> GetEnumerator()
        {
            yield return new object[] {
                new Car
                {
                  Id=1,
                  Price=36000000,
                  Manufacturer = new Manufacturer
                  {
                    Country="country",
                    Name="name"
                  }
                }
            };
        }
        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() => GetEnumerator();
    }

It's time for creating a test method(CarTest) and define the car as a parameter:

[Theory]
[ClassData(typeof(CarClassData))]
public void CarTest(Car car)
{
     var output = car;
     var result = _myRepository.BuyCar(car);
}

complex type in theory

Good Luck

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  • 3
    This answer explicitly addresses the question of passing a custom type as the Theory input which seems to be missing from the selected answer. – J.D. Cain Aug 28 '19 at 11:32
  • 1
    This is exactly the use-case I was looking for which is how to pass a complex type as a parameter to a Theory. Works perfectly! This really pays off for testing MVP patterns. I can now setup many different instances of a View in all sorts of states and pass them all into the same Theory which tests the effects that Presenter methods have on that view. LOVE it! – Denis M. Kitchen Oct 17 '19 at 15:25
3

You can try this way:

public class TestClass {

    bool isSaturday(DateTime dt)
    {
       string day = dt.DayOfWeek.ToString();
       return (day == "Saturday");
    }

    [Theory]
    [MemberData("IsSaturdayIndex", MemberType = typeof(TestCase))]
    public void test(int i)
    {
       // parse test case
       var input = TestCase.IsSaturdayTestCase[i];
       DateTime dt = (DateTime)input[0];
       bool expected = (bool)input[1];

       // test
       bool result = isSaturday(dt);
       result.Should().Be(expected);
    }   
}

Create another class to hold the test data:

public class TestCase
{
   public static readonly List<object[]> IsSaturdayTestCase = new List<object[]>
   {
      new object[]{new DateTime(2016,1,23),true},
      new object[]{new DateTime(2016,1,24),false}
   };

   public static IEnumerable<object[]> IsSaturdayIndex
   {
      get
      {
         List<object[]> tmp = new List<object[]>();
            for (int i = 0; i < IsSaturdayTestCase.Count; i++)
                tmp.Add(new object[] { i });
         return tmp;
      }
   }
}
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1

This is how I solved your problem, I had the same scenario. So inline with custom objects and a different number of objects on each run.

    [Theory]
    [ClassData(typeof(DeviceTelemetryTestData))]
    public async Task ProcessDeviceTelemetries_TypicalDeserialization_NoErrorAsync(params DeviceTelemetry[] expected)
    {
        // Arrange
        var timeStamp = DateTimeOffset.UtcNow;

        mockInflux.Setup(x => x.ExportTelemetryToDb(It.IsAny<List<DeviceTelemetry>>())).ReturnsAsync("Success");

        // Act
        var actual = await MessageProcessingTelemetry.ProcessTelemetry(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(expected), mockInflux.Object);

        // Assert
        mockInflux.Verify(x => x.ExportTelemetryToDb(It.IsAny<List<DeviceTelemetry>>()), Times.Once);
        Assert.Equal("Success", actual);
    }

So this is my unit test, notice the params parameter. This allow to send a different number of object. And now my DeviceTelemetryTestData class :

    public class DeviceTelemetryTestData : IEnumerable<object[]>
    {
        public IEnumerator<object[]> GetEnumerator()
        {
            yield return new object[] { new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "asd" }, new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "qwe" } };
            yield return new object[] { new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "asd" }, new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "qwe" } };
            yield return new object[] { new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "asd" }, new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "qwe" } };
            yield return new object[] { new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "asd" }, new DeviceTelemetry { DeviceId = "qwe" } };
        }

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() => GetEnumerator();
    }

Hope it helps !

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0

For my needs I just wanted to run a series of 'test users' through some tests - but [ClassData] etc. seemed overkill for what I needed (because the list of items was localized to each test).

So I did the following, with an array inside the test - indexed from the outside:

[Theory]
[InlineData(0)]
[InlineData(1)]
[InlineData(2)]
[InlineData(3)]
public async Task Account_ExistingUser_CorrectPassword(int userIndex)
{
    // DIFFERENT INPUT DATA (static fake users on class)
    var user = new[]
    {
        EXISTING_USER_NO_MAPPING,
        EXISTING_USER_MAPPING_TO_DIFFERENT_EXISTING_USER,
        EXISTING_USER_MAPPING_TO_SAME_USER,
        NEW_USER

    } [userIndex];

    var response = await Analyze(new CreateOrLoginMsgIn
    {
        Username = user.Username,
        Password = user.Password
    });

    // expected result (using ExpectedObjects)
    new CreateOrLoginResult
    {
        AccessGrantedTo = user.Username

    }.ToExpectedObject().ShouldEqual(response);
}

This achieved my goal, while keeping the intent of the test clear. You just need to keep the indexes in sync but that's all.

Looks nice in the results, it's collapsable and you can rerun a specific instance if you get an error:

enter image description here

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-1

I guess you mistaken here. What xUnit Theory attribute actually means: You want to test this function by sending special/random values as parameters that this function-under-test receives. That means that what you define as the next attribute, such as: InlineData, PropertyData, ClassData, etc.. will be the source for those parameters. That means that you should construct the source object to provide those parameters. In your case I guess you should use ClassData object as source. Also - please note that ClassData inherits from: IEnumerable<> - that means each time another set of generated parameters will be used as incoming parameters for function-under-test until IEnumerable<> produces values.

Example here: Tom DuPont .NET

Example may be incorrect - I didn't use xUnit for a long time

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