234

In terms of performance in Python, is a list-comprehension, or functions like map(), filter() and reduce() faster than a for loop? Why, technically, they run in a C speed, while the for loop runs in the python virtual machine speed?.

Suppose that in a game that I'm developing I need to draw complex and huge maps using for loops. This question would be definitely relevant, for if a list-comprehension, for example, is indeed faster, it would be a much better option in order to avoid lags (Despite the visual complexity of the code).

1
  • 2
    You can have a look at this article. It explains how it works under the hood - which is basically what explains when and how it is faster: pythonsimplified.com/…
    – PlagTag
    Nov 10, 2021 at 14:33

8 Answers 8

207

The following are rough guidelines and educated guesses based on experience. You should timeit or profile your concrete use case to get hard numbers, and those numbers may occasionally disagree with the below.

A list comprehension is usually a tiny bit faster than the precisely equivalent for loop (that actually builds a list), most likely because it doesn't have to look up the list and its append method on every iteration. However, a list comprehension still does a bytecode-level loop:

>>> dis.dis(<the code object for `[x for x in range(10)]`>)
 1           0 BUILD_LIST               0
             3 LOAD_FAST                0 (.0)
       >>    6 FOR_ITER                12 (to 21)
             9 STORE_FAST               1 (x)
            12 LOAD_FAST                1 (x)
            15 LIST_APPEND              2
            18 JUMP_ABSOLUTE            6
       >>   21 RETURN_VALUE

Using a list comprehension in place of a loop that doesn't build a list, nonsensically accumulating a list of meaningless values and then throwing the list away, is often slower because of the overhead of creating and extending the list. List comprehensions aren't magic that is inherently faster than a good old loop.

As for functional list processing functions: While these are written in C and probably outperform equivalent functions written in Python, they are not necessarily the fastest option. Some speed up is expected if the function is written in C too. But most cases using a lambda (or other Python function), the overhead of repeatedly setting up Python stack frames etc. eats up any savings. Simply doing the same work in-line, without function calls (e.g. a list comprehension instead of map or filter) is often slightly faster.

Suppose that in a game that I'm developing I need to draw complex and huge maps using for loops. This question would be definitely relevant, for if a list-comprehension, for example, is indeed faster, it would be a much better option in order to avoid lags (Despite the visual complexity of the code).

Chances are, if code like this isn't already fast enough when written in good non-"optimized" Python, no amount of Python level micro optimization is going to make it fast enough and you should start thinking about dropping to C. While extensive micro optimizations can often speed up Python code considerably, there is a low (in absolute terms) limit to this. Moreover, even before you hit that ceiling, it becomes simply more cost efficient (15% speedup vs. 300% speed up with the same effort) to bite the bullet and write some C.

4
  • 3
    This does not seem accurate any longer. I just used the dis package in python 3.6 and the list comprehension does not create any for loop, while the for loop does. More specifically, the list comprehension code now loads a build-in function called <listcomp> with LOAD_CONST and executes it. My guess is that this function is implemented in C.
    – MattSt
    Jul 31, 2022 at 11:05
  • 2
    @MattSt You ignored the part of the dis output that showed the bytecode for the function, including the looping. Mar 24, 2023 at 22:34
  • @KellyBundy I am not sure what bytecode you are talking about. The output was similarly structured to the output in this post. No bytecode was included for the function. Just a LOAD_CONST. I would appreciate a more updated answer to the original question instead of a comment.
    – MattSt
    Jun 20, 2023 at 7:28
  • @MattSt Ok I might update (mostly because the answer's dis.dis(<the code object ... call isn't real code that one can run). But can you show your code and full output? Paste it to dpaste.org or so and share the link in a comment. Jun 20, 2023 at 8:22
30

If you check the info on python.org, you can see this summary:

Version Time (seconds)
Basic loop 3.47
Eliminate dots 2.45
Local variable & no dots 1.79
Using map function 0.54

But you really should read the above article in details to understand the cause of the performance difference.

I also strongly suggest you should time your code by using timeit. At the end of the day, there can be a situation where, for example, you may need to break out of for loop when a condition is met. It could potentially be faster than finding out the result by calling map.

4
  • 41
    While that page is a good read and partly related, just quoting those numbers is not helpful, possibly even misleading.
    – user395760
    Mar 1, 2014 at 0:45
  • 5
    This gives no indication of what you're timing. Relative performance will vary greatly depending on what's in the loop/listcomp/map. Mar 1, 2014 at 0:46
  • @delnan I agree. I have modified my answer to urge OP to read the documentation to understand the difference in performance. Mar 1, 2014 at 0:49
  • @user2357112 You have to read the wiki page I linked for the context. I posted it for OP's reference. Mar 1, 2014 at 0:51
17

I modified @Alisa's code and used cProfile to show why list comprehension is faster:

from functools import reduce
import datetime

def reduce_(numbers):
    return reduce(lambda sum, next: sum + next * next, numbers, 0)

def for_loop(numbers):
    a = []
    for i in numbers:
        a.append(i*2)
    a = sum(a)
    return a

def map_(numbers):
    sqrt = lambda x: x*x
    return sum(map(sqrt, numbers))

def list_comp(numbers):
    return(sum([i*i for i in numbers]))

funcs = [
        reduce_,
        for_loop,
        map_,
        list_comp
        ]

if __name__ == "__main__":
    # [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3]
    import cProfile
    for f in funcs:
        print('=' * 25)
        print("Profiling:", f.__name__)
        print('=' * 25)
        pr = cProfile.Profile()
        for i in range(10**6):
            pr.runcall(f, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
        pr.create_stats()
        pr.print_stats()

Here's the results:

=========================
Profiling: reduce_
=========================
         11000000 function calls in 1.501 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
  1000000    0.162    0.000    1.473    0.000 profiling.py:4(reduce_)
  8000000    0.461    0.000    0.461    0.000 profiling.py:5(<lambda>)
  1000000    0.850    0.000    1.311    0.000 {built-in method _functools.reduce}
  1000000    0.028    0.000    0.028    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


=========================
Profiling: for_loop
=========================
         11000000 function calls in 1.372 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
  1000000    0.879    0.000    1.344    0.000 profiling.py:7(for_loop)
  1000000    0.145    0.000    0.145    0.000 {built-in method builtins.sum}
  8000000    0.320    0.000    0.320    0.000 {method 'append' of 'list' objects}
  1000000    0.027    0.000    0.027    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


=========================
Profiling: map_
=========================
         11000000 function calls in 1.470 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
  1000000    0.264    0.000    1.442    0.000 profiling.py:14(map_)
  8000000    0.387    0.000    0.387    0.000 profiling.py:15(<lambda>)
  1000000    0.791    0.000    1.178    0.000 {built-in method builtins.sum}
  1000000    0.028    0.000    0.028    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}


=========================
Profiling: list_comp
=========================
         4000000 function calls in 0.737 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
  1000000    0.318    0.000    0.709    0.000 profiling.py:18(list_comp)
  1000000    0.261    0.000    0.261    0.000 profiling.py:19(<listcomp>)
  1000000    0.131    0.000    0.131    0.000 {built-in method builtins.sum}
  1000000    0.027    0.000    0.027    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}

IMHO:

  • reduce and map are in general pretty slow. Not only that, using sum on the iterators that map returned is slow, compared to suming a list
  • for_loop uses append, which is of course slow to some extent
  • list-comprehension not only spent the least time building the list, it also makes sum much quicker, in contrast to map
0
15

You ask specifically about map(), filter() and reduce(), but I assume you want to know about functional programming in general. Having tested this myself on the problem of computing distances between all points within a set of points, functional programming (using the starmap function from the built-in itertools module) turned out to be slightly slower than for-loops (taking 1.25 times as long, in fact). Here is the sample code I used:

import itertools, time, math, random

class Point:
    def __init__(self,x,y):
        self.x, self.y = x, y

point_set = (Point(0, 0), Point(0, 1), Point(0, 2), Point(0, 3))
n_points = 100
pick_val = lambda : 10 * random.random() - 5
large_set = [Point(pick_val(), pick_val()) for _ in range(n_points)]
    # the distance function
f_dist = lambda x0, x1, y0, y1: math.sqrt((x0 - x1) ** 2 + (y0 - y1) ** 2)
    # go through each point, get its distance from all remaining points 
f_pos = lambda p1, p2: (p1.x, p2.x, p1.y, p2.y)

extract_dists = lambda x: itertools.starmap(f_dist, 
                          itertools.starmap(f_pos, 
                          itertools.combinations(x, 2)))

print('Distances:', list(extract_dists(point_set)))

t0_f = time.time()
list(extract_dists(large_set))
dt_f = time.time() - t0_f

Is the functional version faster than the procedural version?

def extract_dists_procedural(pts):
    n_pts = len(pts)
    l = []    
    for k_p1 in range(n_pts - 1):
        for k_p2 in range(k_p1, n_pts):
            l.append((pts[k_p1].x - pts[k_p2].x) ** 2 +
                     (pts[k_p1].y - pts[k_p2].y) ** 2)
    return l

t0_p = time.time()
list(extract_dists_procedural(large_set)) 
    # using list() on the assumption that
    # it eats up as much time as in the functional version

dt_p = time.time() - t0_p

f_vs_p = dt_p / dt_f
if f_vs_p >= 1.0:
    print('Time benefit of functional progamming:', f_vs_p, 
          'times as fast for', n_points, 'points')
else:
    print('Time penalty of functional programming:', 1 / f_vs_p, 
          'times as slow for', n_points, 'points')
0
11

I wrote a simple script that test the speed and this is what I found out. Actually for loop was fastest in my case. That really suprised me, check out bellow (was calculating sum of squares).

from functools import reduce
import datetime


def time_it(func, numbers, *args):
    start_t = datetime.datetime.now()
    for i in range(numbers):
        func(args[0])
    print (datetime.datetime.now()-start_t)

def square_sum1(numbers):
    return reduce(lambda sum, next: sum+next**2, numbers, 0)


def square_sum2(numbers):
    a = 0
    for i in numbers:
        i = i**2
        a += i
    return a

def square_sum3(numbers):
    sqrt = lambda x: x**2
    return sum(map(sqrt, numbers))

def square_sum4(numbers):
    return(sum([int(i)**2 for i in numbers]))


time_it(square_sum1, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum2, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum3, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum4, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
0:00:00.302000 #Reduce
0:00:00.144000 #For loop
0:00:00.318000 #Map
0:00:00.390000 #List comprehension
4
  • With python 3.6.1 differences are not so big; Reduce and Map go down to 0.24 and list comprehension to 0.29. For is higher, at 0.18.
    – jjmerelo
    Mar 18, 2018 at 13:11
  • 1
    Eliminating the int in square_sum4 also makes it quite a bit faster and just a bit slower than the for loop.
    – jjmerelo
    Mar 18, 2018 at 13:16
  • 3
    This is a bad example to show the speeds. for loop won because you made it that it doesn't waste resources compared to others. Each run with map and reduce creates function object anew and that wastes resources - extract the functions. In list comprehension you did nonsensical thing to create throwaway list to just pass it to sum - remove brackets. You've also used your own implementation of timing function instead using more accurate timeit module.
    – WloHu
    Jul 20, 2021 at 9:58
  • Who times the custom time_it?
    – mirekphd
    Oct 17, 2022 at 10:18
7

I have managed to modify some of @alpiii's code and discovered that List comprehension is a little faster than for loop. It might be caused by int(), it is not fair between list comprehension and for loop.

from functools import reduce
import datetime

def time_it(func, numbers, *args):
    start_t = datetime.datetime.now()
    for i in range(numbers):
        func(args[0])
    print (datetime.datetime.now()-start_t)

def square_sum1(numbers):
    return reduce(lambda sum, next: sum+next*next, numbers, 0)

def square_sum2(numbers):
    a = []
    for i in numbers:
        a.append(i*2)
    a = sum(a)
    return a

def square_sum3(numbers):
    sqrt = lambda x: x*x
    return sum(map(sqrt, numbers))

def square_sum4(numbers):
    return(sum([i*i for i in numbers]))

time_it(square_sum1, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum2, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum3, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum4, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
0:00:00.101122 #Reduce

0:00:00.089216 #For loop

0:00:00.101532 #Map

0:00:00.068916 #List comprehension
6

Adding a twist to Alphii answer, actually the for loop would be second best and about 6 times slower than map

from functools import reduce
import datetime


def time_it(func, numbers, *args):
    start_t = datetime.datetime.now()
    for i in range(numbers):
        func(args[0])
    print (datetime.datetime.now()-start_t)

def square_sum1(numbers):
    return reduce(lambda sum, next: sum+next**2, numbers, 0)


def square_sum2(numbers):
    a = 0
    for i in numbers:
        a += i**2
    return a

def square_sum3(numbers):
    a = 0
    map(lambda x: a+x**2, numbers)
    return a

def square_sum4(numbers):
    a = 0
    return [a+i**2 for i in numbers]

time_it(square_sum1, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum2, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum3, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
time_it(square_sum4, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])

Main changes have been to eliminate the slow sum calls, as well as the probably unnecessary int() in the last case. Putting the for loop and map in the same terms makes it quite fact, actually. Remember that lambdas are functional concepts and theoretically shouldn't have side effects, but, well, they can have side effects like adding to a. Results in this case with Python 3.6.1, Ubuntu 14.04, Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-4770 CPU @ 3.40GHz

0:00:00.257703 #Reduce
0:00:00.184898 #For loop
0:00:00.031718 #Map
0:00:00.212699 #List comprehension
1
  • 4
    square_sum3 and square_sum4 are incorrect. They will not give sum. Answer below from @alisca chen is actually correct.
    – ShikharDua
    Oct 30, 2019 at 18:18
2

I was looking for some performance information regarding 'for' loops and 'list comprehension' and stumbled upon this topic. It has been a few months since Python 3.11 release (October 2022) and one of the main features of Python 3.11 was speed improvements. https://www.python.org/downloads/release/python-3110/

The Faster CPython Project is already yielding some exciting results. Python 3.11 is up to 10-60% faster than Python 3.10. On average, we measured a 1.22x speedup on the standard benchmark suite. See Faster CPython for details.

I ran the same code originally posted by Alphi and then "twisted" by jjmerelo. Python3.10 and Python3.11 results below:

    from functools import reduce
    import datetime
    
    def time_it(func, numbers, *args):
        start_t = datetime.datetime.now()
        for i in range(numbers):
            func(args[0])
        print(datetime.datetime.now()-start_t)
    
    def square_sum1(numbers):
        return reduce(lambda sum, next: sum+next**2, numbers, 0)
    
    
    def square_sum2(numbers):
        a = 0
        for i in numbers:
            a += i**2
        return a
    
    
    def square_sum3(numbers):
        a = 0
        map(lambda x: a+x**2, numbers)
        return a
    
    
    def square_sum4(numbers):
        a = 0
        return [a+i**2 for i in numbers]
    
    
    time_it(square_sum1, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
    time_it(square_sum2, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
    time_it(square_sum3, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])
    time_it(square_sum4, 100000, [1, 2, 5, 3, 1, 2, 5, 3])

I haven't calculated the exact percentage improvement but it is clear that the performance gain - at least in this particular instance - seems to be impressive (3 to 4 times faster) with the exception of 'map' which has negligible performance improvement.

#Python 3.10
0:00:00.221134  #Reduce
0:00:00.186307  #For
0:00:00.024311  #Map
0:00:00.206454  #List comprehension

#python3.11
0:00:00.072550  #Reduce
0:00:00.037168  #For
0:00:00.021702  #Map
0:00:00.058655  #List Comprehension

Note: I ran this on a Kali Linux VM running under Windows 11 using WSL. I'm not sure if this code might perform even better if run natively (bare metal) on a Linux instance.

My Kali Linux VM specs below:

Architecture:                    x86_64
CPU op-mode(s):                  32-bit, 64-bit
Address sizes:                   39 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
Byte Order:                      Little Endian
CPU(s):                          8
On-line CPU(s) list:             0-7
Vendor ID:                       GenuineIntel
Model name:                      Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-6700T CPU @ 2.80GHz
CPU family:                      6
Model:                           94
Thread(s) per core:              2
Core(s) per socket:              4
Socket(s):                       1
Stepping:                        3
BogoMIPS:                        5615.99
Flags:                           fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht syscall nx pdpe1gb rdtscp lm constant_tsc rep_good nopl xtopology cpuid pni pclmulqdq vmx ssse3 fma cx16 pcid sse4_1 sse4_2 movbe popcnt aes xsave avx f16c rdrand hypervisor lahf_lm abm 3dnowprefetch invpcid_single pti ssbd ibrs ibpb stibp tpr_shadow vnmi ept vpid ept_ad fsgsbase bmi1 hle avx2 smep bmi2 erms invpcid rtm rdseed adx smap clflushopt xsaveopt xsavec xgetbv1 xsaves flush_l1d arch_capabilities
Virtualization:                  VT-x
Hypervisor vendor:               Microsoft
Virtualization type:             full
L1d cache:                       128 KiB (4 instances)
L1i cache:                       128 KiB (4 instances)
L2 cache:                        1 MiB (4 instances)
L3 cache:                        8 MiB (1 instance)
Vulnerability Itlb multihit:     KVM: Mitigation: VMX disabled
Vulnerability L1tf:              Mitigation; PTE Inversion; VMX conditional cache flushes, SMT vulnerable
Vulnerability Mds:               Vulnerable: Clear CPU buffers attempted, no microcode; SMT Host state unknown
Vulnerability Meltdown:          Mitigation; PTI
Vulnerability Spec store bypass: Mitigation; Speculative Store Bypass disabled via prctl and seccomp
Vulnerability Spectre v1:        Mitigation; usercopy/swapgs barriers and __user pointer sanitization
Vulnerability Spectre v2:        Mitigation; Full generic retpoline, IBPB conditional, IBRS_FW, STIBP conditional, RSB filling
Vulnerability Srbds:             Unknown: Dependent on hypervisor status
Vulnerability Tsx async abort:   Vulnerable: Clear CPU buffers attempted, no microcode; SMT Host state unknown
1
  • Your 4 functions all do different things. 4 builds a list. 3 returns an iterator of the same values in 4. 2 and 1 do the same but I'm guessing it's unrolling the loop for such a short, static list. Jun 13, 2023 at 8:36

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