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I have been working on this function for the past two days and I cant seem to figure it out. The function displayBoard() opens up a text file, in this case "board.txt" and places it into a 1D array. The code was provided by my professor. I made it into a function and tried to return the array board[] so I can manipulate it in main but I am unable to do it, What am I missing?

void displayBoard ()
{
    FILE *pInputFile;        // file pointer
    char board[64];          // the 8x8 board
    int i=0;                 // loop counter
    char inputFileName[] = "board.txt";

    // Associate the actual file name with file pointer and try to open it
    pInputFile = fopen(inputFileName, "r");
    // Verify input file was found
    if (pInputFile == NULL) {
        printf("Attempt to open file %s failed.  Exiting ... \n", inputFileName);
        exit( -1);
    }

    // Read from the file into the board.  Space in front of %c is important!
    while (fscanf(pInputFile, " %c", &board[i]) != EOF) {
        i++;
    }

    fclose(pInputFile);   // close input file

    // show contents of board
    printf("Board is: ");
    for (i=0; i<64; i++) {
        if (i%8 == 0) {
            printf("\n");
        }
        printf("%c ", board[ i]);
    }

    printf("\n\n");

    return board;
}    

int main ()
{
    printf(" %s", board); // This is my printf statement to see if I am able to access 
                          // board[] from the function
}
4
  • board is on the stack. What happens to it when the function returns? Mar 1, 2014 at 5:23
  • Is this copied verbatim? You have an unterminated string in the call to printf from main.
    – pat
    Mar 1, 2014 at 5:42
  • the code in main is mine printing the board to see if I could access it from the function. The code from the function was copied and pasted. Mar 1, 2014 at 5:54
  • Suggest either 1) passing into displayBoard() a pointer to a char board[64], 2) allocating in displayBoard() a char * of size 64 or 3) returning a structure that has a 64 char field. Mar 1, 2014 at 5:57

5 Answers 5

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You need to make the method return a char * by declaring the function

char * displayBoard {
    ...
}
2
  • Could you please elaborate a little more? Mar 1, 2014 at 5:45
  • 1
    As Carey suggested you need to first allocate memory for your char array 'board' to put it on the heap and then you can simply return it to your main method. A simple googling of 'how to allocate a char array' should do the trick.
    – Groot
    Mar 1, 2014 at 6:00
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You can not. You have to pass the array you want to modify using pointers and modify it inside the function.

#include <stdio.h>


void function(int b[][10], int m, int n){
  int i = 0, j = 0; 
  for(i = 0; i < m; ++i){
    for(j = 0; j < n; ++j){
      b[i][j] = i + j;
    }
  }
}

int main(){
  int board[10][10] = {0};
  int i = 0, j = 0; 


  for(i = 0; i < 10; ++i){
    for(j = 0; j < 10; ++j){
      printf("%d ", board[i][j]);
    }
    printf("\n");
  }



  function(board, 10, 10);



  for(i = 0; i < 10; ++i){
    for(j = 0; j < 10; ++j){
      printf("%d ", board[i][j]);
    }
    printf("\n");
  }


  return 0;
}
2
  • If im dealing with a 1D array would the parameters change to void function (char *array[], int size) ? Mar 1, 2014 at 5:51
  • This seems to be moving firmly in the right direction. You can't return any value from a function that returns void. You can't return an array from any function in C; the standard prohibits that. So, the first statement is correct. There are two possible strategies for dealing with 'have a function populate an array that is accessible to its caller': (1) have the caller provide the memory for the array, as espoused in this answer, or (2) the called function should dynamically allocate the array and return a pointer to the caller. Mar 1, 2014 at 14:53
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Ok I decided to part my function into 2, one to generate the board and one to to display the board, so I can just use displayBoard() whenever I want to re-display it in main.

void generateBoard (char board[]){
    FILE *pInputFile;        // file pointer
    int i=0;                 // loop counter
    char inputFileName[] = "board.txt";
    // Associate the actual file name with file pointer and try to open it
    pInputFile = fopen(inputFileName, "r");
    // Verify input file was found
    if( pInputFile == NULL) {
        printf("Attempt to open file %s failed.  Exiting ... \n", inputFileName);
        exit( -1);
    }

    // Read from the file into the board.  Space in front of %c is important!
    while( fscanf(pInputFile, " %c", &board[ i]) != EOF)  {
        i++;
    }

    fclose( pInputFile);   // close input file
}


void displayBoard (char board[]){
    // show contents of board
    printf("Board is: ");

    int i;
    for( i=0; i<64; i++) {
        if( i%8 == 0) {
            printf("\n");
        }
        printf("%c ", board[ i]);
    }

    printf("\n\n");

}
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I have an update on my function, I am a first time user of this site so im not sure if I should be posting it here or on my OP. This is what I came up with

char* displayBoard (char board[]){
    FILE *pInputFile;        // file pointer
    int i=0;                 // loop counter
    char inputFileName[] = "board.txt";
    // Associate the actual file name with file pointer and try to open it
    pInputFile = fopen(inputFileName, "r");
    // Verify input file was found
    if( pInputFile == NULL) {
        printf("Attempt to open file %s failed.  Exiting ... \n", inputFileName);
        exit( -1);
    }

    // Read from the file into the board.  Space in front of %c is important!
    while( fscanf(pInputFile, " %c", &board[ i]) != EOF)  {
        i++;
    }

    fclose( pInputFile);   // close input file

    // show contents of board
    printf("Board is: ");
    for( i=0; i<64; i++) {
        if( i%8 == 0) {
            printf("\n");
        }
        printf("%c ", board[ i]);
    }

    printf("\n\n");

    return board;
}
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When you write code returning results in an array, it is better to let the caller provide the array in which the code should return its results than to let the code allocate itself an array.

The reason for this is that pointer ownership transfers make it hard to reason about memory management, so it is better to keep their amount at a minimum.

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