I wonder how to write palindrome in javascript, where I input different words and program shows if word is palindrome or not. For example word noon is palindrome, while bad is not.

Thank you in advance.

  • 17
    usually objective of asking someone to write a function that detects a palindrome is to teach them programming. If you get someone else to do it, you're not learning anything. – Ben Mar 1 '14 at 7:31
  • This was already asked and answered a few times stackoverflow.com/a/20662606/437019 – Yossi Shasho Mar 5 '14 at 12:52

38 Answers 38

up vote 40 down vote accepted
function palindrome(str) {
    var len = str.length;
    for ( var i = 0; i < Math.floor(len/2); i++ ) {
        if (str[i] !== str[len - 1 - i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

palindrome will return if specified word is palindrome, based on boolean value (true/false)

UPDATE:

I opened bounty on this question due to performance and I've done research and here are the results:

If we are dealing with very large amount of data like

var abc = "asdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfdasdhfkahkjdfhkaksjdfhaksdfjhakjddfhkjahksdhfaiuyqewiuryiquweyriyqiuweyriuqiuweryiquweyriuqyweirukajsdhfkahdfjkhakjsdhfkahksdhfakhdjkfqwiueryqiueyriuasdkfjhakjhdfkjashfkajhsdfkjahsdkalsdjflkasjdfljqoiweurasldjflasfd";

for ( var i = 0; i < 10; i++ ) {
    abc += abc;  // making string even more larger
}

function reverse(s) { // using this method for second half of string to be embedded
    return s.split("").reverse().join("");
}

abc += reverse(abc); // adding second half string to make string true palindrome

In this example palindrome is True, just to note

Posted palindrome function gives us time from 180 to 210 Milliseconds (in current example), and the function posted below with string == string.split('').reverse().join('') method gives us 980 to 1010 Milliseconds.

Machine Details:

System: Ubuntu 13.10 OS Type: 32 Bit RAM: 2 Gb CPU: 3.4 Ghz*2 Browser: Firefox 27.0.1

  • 2
    Also note that in your first example you only need to traverse half the string length. – MrWhite Mar 5 '14 at 17:26
  • @w3d Yes, exactly I meant it :) – nanoba Mar 5 '14 at 17:44
  • 2
    @crypticous No, he meant your palindrome function is doing redundant comparisons for half the time; After comparing the first str.length/2 characters to the last str.length/2 characters, you already know if the string is a palindrome, since you've compared the first half to the last half. That is, you should divide str.length by two to get exactly the same result but twice as fast. – Aleksi Torhamo Mar 11 '14 at 21:39
  • @AleksiTorhamo I know what you mean, though I've counted time after whole string was successfully defined. I mean I counted time directly when started checking with palindrome function – nanoba Mar 11 '14 at 21:48
  • you might store the half in another variable to avoid calculate it every iteration var half = Math.floor(len/2); then in the for for (var i = 0; i < half; i++) – Isaac Zepeda Mar 7 '15 at 19:34

Try this:

var isPalindrome = function (string) {
    if (string == string.split('').reverse().join('')) {
        alert(string + ' is palindrome.');
    }
    else {
        alert(string + ' is not palindrome.');
    }
}

document.getElementById('form_id').onsubmit = function() {
   isPalindrome(document.getElementById('your_input').value);
}

So this script alerts the result, is it palindrome or not. You need to change the your_id with your input id and form_id with your form id to get this work.

Demo!

  • Just wondering if there might be potential problems with the string reversal method used here, due to JavaScript's internal character encoding? I doubt this would be a problem with English palindromes, however, it might be more of a problem in other languages. Just something to be aware of. stackoverflow.com/a/16776621/369434 – MrWhite Mar 5 '14 at 13:42
  • You are right, but I think the OP didn't need compatibility for i.e non-letters like symbols or something. As he pointed out the example "noon". Why even you would like to have support for symbols? – aksu Mar 5 '14 at 14:50
  • I wasn't necessarily thinking of generic "symbols", but of accented letters (eg. á, é, í, ó, ú, ü, ñ, etc.) and other non-latin alphabets - whether they would be a problem or not I don't know. But yes, only English examples were given. – MrWhite Mar 5 '14 at 15:04
  • It's performance is too slow with big amount of data – nanoba Mar 5 '14 at 16:44
  • 1
    While this solution is simple/beautiful, but with larger sets of data wouldn't the combination of == and .reverse() be slower than just traversing half the string length? – theGreenCabbage Mar 11 '14 at 21:53

Use something like this

function isPalindrome(s) {
    return s == s.split("").reverse().join("") ? true : false;
}

alert(isPalindrome("noon"));

alternatively the above code can be optimized as [updated after rightfold's comment]

function isPalindrome(s) {
    return s == s.split("").reverse().join("");
}

alert(isPalindrome("malayalam")); 
alert(isPalindrome("english")); 
  • 11
    ? true : false is silly. – rightfold Mar 5 '14 at 12:50
  • @rightfold Yep, I overlooked that, thx for pointing out. – kiranvj Mar 5 '14 at 17:32
  • 1
    @rightfold I would say it's more verbose. You can instantly see that it'll be returning a boolean. – James Mar 11 '14 at 23:00
  • 1
    @James as with ==. – rightfold Mar 12 '14 at 8:22
  • The comparison s == s^R suffers from the double effort as well, as in case of a palindrome s = uu^R it compares uu^R with (uu^R)^R = (u^R)^Ru^R = u^Ru, where it would suffice to split at the middle and compare u with u^R instead. – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 11:22

Look at this:

function isPalindrome(word){
    if(word==null || word.length==0){
        // up to you if you want true or false here, don't comment saying you 
        // would put true, I put this check here because of 
        // the following i < Math.ceil(word.length/2) && i< word.length
        return false;
    }
    var lastIndex=Math.ceil(word.length/2);
    for (var i = 0; i < lastIndex  && i< word.length; i++) {
        if (word[i] != word[word.length-1-i]) {
            return false;
        }
     }
     return true;
} 

Edit: now half operation of comparison are performed since I iterate only up to half word to compare it with the last part of the word. Faster for large data!!!

Since the string is an array of char no need to use charAt functions!!!

Reference: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Javascript_code_for_palindrome

  • Again too many comparisions. – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 11:35
  • Now it does half the comparisons..you can't do less – piacente.cristian Mar 12 '14 at 13:41

Faster Way:

-Compute half the way in loop.

-Store length of the word in a variable instead of calculating every time.

EDIT: Store word length/2 in a temporary variable as not to calculate every time in the loop as pointed out by (mvw) .

function isPalindrome(word){
   var i,wLength = word.length-1,wLengthToCompare = wLength/2;

   for (i = 0; i <= wLengthToCompare ; i++) {
     if (word.charAt(i) != word.charAt(wLength-i)) {
        return false;
     }
   }
   return true;
} 
  • 1
    I am pretty sure that modern JS engines can optimize out the .length access – Bartek Banachewicz Mar 5 '14 at 12:52
  • +1 for the traversing half the original string length (other answers seem to have missed this for some reason). – MrWhite Mar 5 '14 at 13:08
  • @BartekBanachewicz You are correct that the 'length' property is not always calculated and thus does not cost performance on some browsers. However, on some browsers, caching to a variable is faster than accessing the 'length' property in a loop. – Sai Mar 5 '14 at 15:27
  • @Sai Then at least it shouldn't be stated that it's ultimately faster, but I see you've already done the edit. – Bartek Banachewicz Mar 5 '14 at 15:29
  • But you recalculate wLength/2 + 1 and wLength-1 at every iteration of the loop. – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 11:25

Let us start from the recursive definition of a palindrome:

  1. The empty string '' is a palindrome
  2. The string consisting of the character c, thus 'c', is a palindrome
  3. If the string s is a palindrome, then the string 'c' + s + 'c' for some character c is a palindrome

This definition can be coded straight into JavaScript:

function isPalindrome(s) {
  var len = s.length;
  // definition clauses 1. and 2.
  if (len < 2) {
    return true;
  }
  // note: len >= 2
  // definition clause 3.
  if (s[0] != s[len - 1]) {
    return false;
  }
  // note: string is of form s = 'a' + t + 'a'
  // note: s.length >= 2 implies t.length >= 0
  var t = s.substr(1, len - 2);
  return isPalindrome(t);
}

Here is some additional test code for MongoDB's mongo JavaScript shell, in a web browser with debugger replace print() with console.log()

function test(s) {
  print('isPalindrome(' + s + '): ' + isPalindrome(s));
}

test('');
test('a');
test('ab');
test('aa');
test('aab');
test('aba');
test('aaa');
test('abaa');
test('neilarmstronggnortsmralien');
test('neilarmstrongxgnortsmralien');
test('neilarmstrongxsortsmralien');

I got this output:

$ mongo palindrome.js
MongoDB shell version: 2.4.8
connecting to: test
isPalindrome(): true
isPalindrome(a): true
isPalindrome(ab): false
isPalindrome(aa): true
isPalindrome(aab): false
isPalindrome(aba): true
isPalindrome(aaa): true
isPalindrome(abaa): false
isPalindrome(neilarmstronggnortsmralien): true
isPalindrome(neilarmstrongxgnortsmralien): true
isPalindrome(neilarmstrongxsortsmralien): false

An iterative solution is:

function isPalindrome(s) {
  var len = s.length;
  if (len < 2) {
    return true;
  }
  var i = 0;
  var j = len - 1;
  while (i < j) {
    if (s[i] != s[j]) {
      return false;
    }
    i += 1;
    j -= 1;
  }
  return true;
}

Taking a stab at this. Kind of hard to measure performance, though.

function palin(word) {
    var i = 0,
        len = word.length - 1,
        max = word.length / 2 | 0;

    while (i < max) {
        if (word.charCodeAt(i) !== word.charCodeAt(len - i)) {
            return false;
        }
        i += 1;
    }
    return true;
}

My thinking is to use charCodeAt() instead charAt() with the hope that allocating a Number instead of a String will have better perf because Strings are variable length and might be more complex to allocate. Also, only iterating halfway through (as noted by sai) because that's all that's required. Also, if the length is odd (ex: 'aba'), the middle character is always ok.

  • Noteworty use of |0 to cast to integers. – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 12:52

The most important thing to do when solving a Technical Test is Don't use shortcut methods -- they want to see how you think algorithmically! Not your use of methods.

Here is one that I came up with (45 minutes after I blew the test). There are a couple optimizations to make though. When writing any algorithm, its best to assume false and alter the logic if its looking to be true.

isPalindrome():

Basically, to make this run in O(N) (linear) complexity you want to have 2 iterators whose vectors point towards each other. Meaning, one iterator that starts at the beginning and one that starts at the end, each traveling inward. You could have the iterators traverse the whole array and use a condition to break/return once they meet in the middle, but it may save some work to only give each iterator a half-length by default.

for loops seem to force the use of more checks, so I used while loops - which I'm less comfortable with.

Here's the code:

/**
 * TODO: If func counts out, let it return 0
 *  * Assume !isPalindrome (invert logic)
 */
function isPalindrome(S){
    var s = S
      , len = s.length
      , mid = len/2;
      , i = 0, j = len-1;

    while(i<mid){
        var l = s.charAt(i);
        while(j>=mid){
            var r = s.charAt(j);
            if(l === r){
                console.log('@while *', i, l, '...', j, r);
                --j;
                break;
            }
            console.log('@while !', i, l, '...', j, r);
            return 0;
        }
        ++i;
    }
    return 1;
}

var nooe = solution('neveroddoreven');  // even char length
var kayak = solution('kayak');  // odd char length
var kayaks = solution('kayaks');

console.log('@isPalindrome', nooe, kayak, kayaks);

Notice that if the loops count out, it returns true. All the logic should be inverted so that it by default returns false. I also used one short cut method String.prototype.charAt(n), but I felt OK with this as every language natively supports this method.

  • 1
    this really needs to be the top answer. all the others are using shortcut methods, which not only DONT demonstrate how you think algorithmically but are also very unperformant! – feihcsim Dec 8 '17 at 19:53
  • 1
    @feihcsim, coming back to this answer, I noticed we could take this a step further. If we want to, we could even eliminate the 2nd loop (and the use of mid) and set j equal to s.length - i while iterating over the entire array (breaking at i >= j) (not that it effects our time complexity). This is how I, personally, write it in tests now days, but that is more of a matter of what is more readable. It also seems that I mentioned returning false by default but it doesn't look like I am doing that here. Thank you for the kudos. – Cody Jan 18 at 17:07

Best Way to check string is palindrome with more criteria like case and special characters...

function checkPalindrom(str) {
    var str = str.replace(/[^a-zA-Z0-9]+/gi, '').toLowerCase();
    return str == str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

You can test it with following words and strings and gives you more specific result.
1. bob
2. Doc, note, I dissent. A fast never prevents a fatness. I diet on cod

For strings it ignores special characters and convert string to lower case.

  • Again, comparsion of the whole string instead of the half. – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 11:39
function palindrome(str) {
    var lenMinusOne = str.length - 1;
    var halfLen = Math.floor(str.length / 2);

    for (var i = 0; i < halfLen; ++i) {
        if (str[i] != str[lenMinusOne - i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Optimized for half string parsing and for constant value variables.

  • For odd length strings, e.g. str = 'foo', your comparsion looks like "i < 1.5" which involves floats. I wonder if that impacts js engines. And you can avoid calculation arbitrary differences "lenMinusOne - i" by using increments and decrements. Not sure here too, if this would impact modern js engines. – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 12:39
  • @mvw It will take floor value. – Karthik Surianarayanan Mar 12 '14 at 12:44
  • No you're right, it's not rounded like in C, my bad. Still, this algorithm is twice as fast as the accepted answer's on my setup. – neural5torm Mar 12 '14 at 12:44
  • 1
    Many answers here iterate over the full string instead of the half or do the mirror test with the full string instead of halves. The hive mind of the crowd has not realized this yet. :-) – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 12:51
  • The point of my answer is to make difference with reverse function palindrome, the algorithm remains the same in your answer's case. Anyways good job :) – nanoba Mar 12 '14 at 12:54

I think following function with time complexity of o(log n) will be better.

    function palindrom(s){
    s = s.toString();
    var f = true; l = s.length/2, len = s.length -1;
    for(var i=0; i < l; i++){
            if(s[i] != s[len - i]){
                    f = false; 
                    break;
            }
    }
    return f;

    }

console.log(palindrom(12321));

25x faster + recursive + non-branching + terse

function isPalindrome(s,i) {
 return (i=i||0)<0||i>=s.length>>1||s[i]==s[s.length-1-i]&&isPalindrome(s,++i);
}

See my complete explanation here.

    function palindrome(str) {
        var re = /[^A-Za-z0-9]/g;
        str = str.toLowerCase().replace(re, '');
        var len = str.length;
        for (var i = 0; i < len/2; i++) {
            if (str[i] !== str[len - 1 - i]) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }
  • you should explain your solution instead of just dumping some code... – hering Apr 24 '17 at 14:33

How about this one?

function pall (word) {

    var lowerCWord = word.toLowerCase();
    var rev = lowerCWord.split('').reverse().join('');

    return rev.startsWith(lowerCWord);
    }

pall('Madam');

Here's a one-liner without using String.reverse,

const isPal = str => Array
  .apply(null, new Array(strLen = str.length))
  .reduce((acc, s, i) => acc + str[strLen - (i + 1)], '') === str;

str1 is the original string with deleted non-alphanumeric characters and spaces and str2 is the original string reversed.

function palindrome(str) {

  var str1 = str.toLowerCase().replace(/\s/g, '').replace(
    /[^a-zA-Z 0-9]/gi, "");

  var str2 = str.toLowerCase().replace(/\s/g, '').replace(
    /[^a-zA-Z 0-9]/gi, "").split("").reverse().join("");


  if (str1 === str2) {
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

palindrome("almostomla");

Note: This is case sensitive

function palindrome(word)
{
    for(var i=0;i<word.length/2;i++)
        if(word.charAt(i)!=word.charAt(word.length-(i+1)))
            return word+" is Not a Palindrome";
    return word+" is Palindrome";
}

Here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/eJx4v/

  • Unorthodox placement of the index increment outside the for-arguments. – mvw Mar 12 '14 at 12:40
  • @mvw Thanx... Changed.. – Karthik Surianarayanan Mar 12 '14 at 12:56

I am not sure how this JSPerf check the code performance. I just tried to reverse the string & check the values. Please comment about the Pros & Cons of this method.

function palindrome(str) {
    var re = str.split(''),
        reArr = re.slice(0).reverse();

    for (a = 0; a < re.length; a++) {
        if (re[a] == reArr[a]) {
            return false;
        } else {
            return true;
        }
    }
}

JS Perf test

function palindrome(str){
    for (var i = 0; i <= str.length; i++){ 
        if  (str[i] !== str[str.length - 1 - i]) {
            return "The string is not a palindrome";
        }
    }
return "The string IS a palindrome"
}

palindrome("abcdcba"); //"The string IS a palindrome"
palindrome("abcdcb"); //"The string is not a palindrome";

If you console.log this line: console.log(str[i] + " and " + str[str.length - 1 - i]), before the if statement, you'll see what (str[str.length - 1 - i]) is. I think this is the most confusing part but you'll get it easily when you check it out on your console.

All these loops! How about some functional goodness :) May run in to tail call issues on old/current js engines, solved in ES6

function isPalendrome(str){
    var valid = false;
    if(str.length < 2 ) return true;
    function even(i,ii){
        str[i]===str[ii] ? ((i+1 !== ii) ? even(i+1,ii-1) : valid = true) : null
    }
    function odd(i, ii){
        str[i]===str[ii] ? ((i !== ii) ? odd(i+1,ii-1) : valid = true) : null
    }
    if(str.length % 2){
        return odd(0,str.length-1),valid;
    }else{
        return even(0,str.length-1),valid;
    }
}

To test your call stack run this code, you will be able to parse strings double the call stack size

function checkStackSize(){
    var runs = 70000;
    var max_process = 1;
    var max = 0;
    function recurse_me() {
        max_process++;
        if(max_process === runs) return;
        max = max_process;
        try {
            recurse_me()
        } catch(e) {
            max =  max_process;
        }
    }
    recurse_me()
    console.log(max);
}

Due to the symmetrical nature of the problem you could chunk the string from the outside in and process the chunks that are within call stack limits.

by that I mean if the palindromes length is 1000. You could join 0-250 and 750-1000 and join 250-499 with 500-749. You can then pass each chunk in to the function. The advantage to this is you could run the process in parallel using web workers or threads for very large data sets.

Here's another way of doing it:

function isPalin(str) {
  str = str.replace(/\W/g,'').toLowerCase();
  return(str==str.split('').reverse().join(''));
}

Below code tells how to get a string from textBox and tell you whether it is a palindrome are not & displays your answer in another textbox

<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8"/>
<link rel="stylesheet" href=""/>

</head>  
<body>   
<h1>1234</h1>
<div id="demo">Example</div>
<a  accessKey="x" href="http://www.google.com" id="com" >GooGle</a>
<h1 id="tar">"This is a Example Text..."</h1>
Number1 : <input type="text" name="txtname" id="numb"/>
Number2 : <input type="text" name="txtname2" id="numb2"/>
Number2 : <input type="text" name="txtname3" id="numb3" />
<button type="submit"  id="sum" onclick="myfun()" >count</button>
<button type="button"  id="so2" onclick="div()" >counnt</button><br/><br/>
<ol>
<li>water</li>
<li>Mazaa</li>
</ol><br/><br/>
<button onclick="myfun()">TryMe</button>
    <script>
    function myfun(){
    var pass = document.getElementById("numb").value;
    var rev = pass.split("").reverse().join("");
    var text = document.getElementById("numb3");
    text.value = rev;
    if(pass === rev){
    alert(pass + " is a Palindrome");
    }else{
    alert(pass + " is Not a Palindrome")
    }
    }
    </script>
</body>  
</html>  

You could also do something like this :

function isPalindrome(str) {
var newStr = '';

for(var i = str.length - 1; i >=0; i--) {
    newStr += str[i];
}

if(newStr == str) {
    return true;
    return newStr;
} else {
    return false;
    return newStr;
}
}
  • You could improve your answer by pointing out its advantages over other proposed answers, the algorithm itself, the double returns, etc. – dakab Jan 30 '16 at 16:22

ES6 way of doing it. Notice that I take advantage of the array method reduceRight to reverse a string (you can use array methods on strings if you give the string as context, as low level - strings are arrays of chars). No it is not as performant as other solutions, but didn't see any answer that came it it using es6 or higher order functions so figured I'd throw this one out there.

const palindrome = str => {
  const middle = str.length/2;
  const left = str.slice(0, middle)
  const right = Array.prototype.reduceRight.call(str.slice(Math.round(middle)), (str, char) => str + char, '')
  return left === right;
}

To avoid errors with special characters use this function below

function palindrome(str){
  var removeChar = str.replace(/[^A-Z0-9]/ig, "").toLowerCase();
  var checkPalindrome = removeChar.split('').reverse().join('');
  if(removeChar === checkPalindrome){
     return true;
  }else{
    return false;
  }
}
  • You might want to add some example of a case that you function handles better than other solutions :) – Fge Jul 25 '16 at 22:47
  • try running other solutions with this string "A man, a plan, a canal. Panama", "My age is 0, 0 si ega ym." and this "0_0 (: /-\ :) 0-0". you notice the kind of errors i am talking about – paradise-ekpereta Jul 25 '16 at 23:17

The code is concise quick fast and understandable.

TL;DR

Explanation :

Here isPalindrome function accepts a str parameter which is typeof string.

  1. If the length of the str param is less than or equal to one it simply returns "false".
  2. If the above case is false then it moves on to the second if statement and checks that if the character at 0 position of the string is same as character at the last place. It does an inequality test between the both.

    str.charAt(0)  // gives us the value of character in string at position 0
    str.slice(-1)  // gives us the value of last character in the string.
    

If the inequality result is true then it goes ahead and returns false.

  1. If result from the previous statement is false then it recursively calls the isPalindrome(str) function over and over again until the final result.

	function isPalindrome(str){
	
	if (str.length <= 1) return true;
	if (str.charAt(0) != str.slice(-1)) return false;
	return isPalindrome(str.substring(1,str.length-1));
	};


document.getElementById('submit').addEventListener('click',function(){
	var str = prompt('whats the string?');
	alert(isPalindrome(str))
});

document.getElementById('ispdrm').onsubmit = function(){alert(isPalindrome(document.getElementById('inputTxt').value));
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>
<form id='ispdrm'><input type="text" id="inputTxt"></form>

<button id="submit">Click me</button>
</body>
</html>

This tests each end of the string going outside in, exiting as soon as a lack of symmetry is detected.

function isPalindrome(word){
    var head = 0;
    var tail = word.length - 1;
    var palindrome = true;

    while (palindrome && (head < tail)) {
        if (word.charAt(head) !== word.charAt(tail)){
            return false
        } else {
            head ++;
            tail --;
        }
    };
    return true;
};
function palindrome(s) {
  var re = /[\W_]/g;
  var lowRegStr = s.toLowerCase().replace(re, '');
  var reverseStr = lowRegStr.split('').reverse().join(''); 
  return reverseStr === lowRegStr;
}

For better performance you can also use this one

function palindrome(str) {
 str = str.split("");
 var i = str.length;
 var check = "Yes"
 if (i > 1) {
    for (var j = 0; j < i / 2; j++) {
        if (str[j] != str[i - 1 - j]) {
            check = "NO";
            break;
           }
        }
        console.log(check);
    } else {
    console.log("YES");
  }
}

A simple one line code to check whether the string is palindrome or not:

function palindrome (str) {

  return str === str.split("").reverse().join("");

}
<!-- Change the argument to check for other strings -->
<button type="button" onclick="alert(palindrome('naman'));">Click Me<utton>

The above function will return true if the string is palindrome. Else, it will return false.

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