1

I'm working on a random number guessing game as a c# console program. It's done with the code and working. However, there is a part that I want to make better: I declared an instance of a Guess class I created, now how to make this part more efficient?

int counter = 0;
do
{
    myGuess.UserGuess = GetUserGuess(); //read user guess
    if (myGuess.Compair() == "match")
    {
        Console.WriteLine("\n\t Correct!You WIN !");
    }


    else if (myGuess.Compair() == "high")
    {
        if (counter < 3)
            Console.WriteLine("\n\tTry a lower number,");
        else
            Console.WriteLine("\n\tSorry you LOSE !, The right number is " + myGuess.RndNum);

        counter++;
    }

    else if (myGuess.Compair() == "low")
    {
        if (counter < 3)
            Console.WriteLine("\n\tTry a higher number,");
        else

            Console.WriteLine("\n\tSorry you LOSE !, The right number is " + myGuess.RndNum);
        counter++;
     }


} while (myGuess.Compair() != "match" && counter < 4);

Thanks in advance.

6
  • Your question isn't very clear. What do you mean by more efficient? Questions on SO should generally be quite specific, this seems far to general.
    – Ade Miller
    Mar 1, 2014 at 23:48
  • for example I used the same message the same condition twice wich I think this is not the best way .Any way to loop better than that ?
    – sunflower
    Mar 1, 2014 at 23:51
  • 1
    @sunflower This would be better for Code Review
    – user2509901
    Mar 1, 2014 at 23:52
  • How to do Code Review ? Sorry I'm not familiar with the website yet.
    – sunflower
    Mar 1, 2014 at 23:55
  • @sunflower, just so you know, Compare is spelled like "Compare", not "Compair". :)
    – davidsbro
    Mar 2, 2014 at 0:15

1 Answer 1

1

What does "Compair()" function look like? It seems like that could return an integer rather than a string for a simpler function. An example of that looks like:

// just an example implementation
public int Compair() {
   if (UserGuess < actualValue) return -1;
   if (UserGuess > actualValue) return 1;
   return 0;
}

And then your routine becomes:

int counter = 0;
bool success = false;

do
{
    myGuess.UserGuess = GetUserGuess();
    int compair= myGuess.Compair()
    switch (compair) {
      case 0:
        Console.WriteLine("\n\t Correct!You WIN !");
        success = true;
        break;
      case 1:
      case -1:
        if (counter < 3) Console.WriteLine("\n\tTry a {0} number,", compair == -1 ? "lower" : "higher");
        break;
    }

    counter++;
    if (counter >= 3 && !success)
      Console.WriteLine("\n\tSorry you LOSE !, The right number is " + myGuess.RndNum);
  } while (!success && counter < 4);

That should do it! This should be faster because it isn't using string comparisons, it might be a bit easier to read and it should have fixed a few logical issues.

Note - I made a few assumptions about the use of properties so this example might not compile out of the get but it should get you most of the way there. Best of luck!

3
  • Thank you ,I posted the question at CodeReview any way.
    – sunflower
    Mar 2, 2014 at 0:05
  • So it's better practise not compair strings ? Do you know where can I read about best programming practise ?A good useful source I mean ?
    – sunflower
    Mar 2, 2014 at 0:07
  • @sunflower The best way to learn is by asking questions, trying and of course - searching for answers. This question for example, has information on integer versus string comparisons. Keep working and you'll keep learning!
    – drew_w
    Mar 2, 2014 at 1:12

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