12

Any one know how to check that wheter a mouse is clicked inside the circle or polygon. My problem is I want to check that if mouse has been clciked inside the circle or polygon. circle or polygon coordinates has been stored inside an array. Any help is really appreciated

25

As suggested by some other answers, I followed some links and found the c code here. Here is the JavaScript translation for finding whether a point is in a polygon

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function pnpoly( nvert, vertx, verty, testx, testy ) {
    var i, j, c = false;
    for( i = 0, j = nvert-1; i < nvert; j = i++ ) {
        if( ( ( verty[i] > testy ) != ( verty[j] > testy ) ) &&
            ( testx < ( vertx[j] - vertx[i] ) * ( testy - verty[i] ) / ( verty[j] - verty[i] ) + vertx[i] ) ) {
                c = !c;
        }
    }
    return c;
}

nvert - Number of vertices in the polygon. Whether to repeat the first vertex at the end is discussed below.
vertx, verty - Arrays containing the x- and y-coordinates of the polygon's vertices.
testx, testy - X- and y-coordinate of the test point.

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  • Thanks you so much for sending me this example. But i guess it is not working. Can you please test it & send me the tested code? Also please let me know the sigficance of nvert parameter – Dheeraj Feb 6 '10 at 17:34
  • 2
    It works for me. If you follow my link to the page where I found this code, there is a full explanation of why things are done as they are and how to use this function – meouw Feb 6 '10 at 18:35
  • Hi Again... I am doing something like this // Poly Start var myArray2x = new Array(90, 640, 70,50); // Poly x axis var myArray2y = new Array(20, 25, 190,60) result = false result = pnpoly(myArray2x.length,myArray2x,myArray2y,mX,mY) if(result==true) { alert("Clicked inside the Polygon at x = " + mX + " and y = " + mY); } // Poly End – Dheeraj Feb 7 '10 at 6:47
  • function pnpoly( nvert, vertx, verty, testx, testy ) { alert('Inside Funtion'); var i, j, c = false; for( i = 0, j = nvert-1; i < nvert; j = i++ ) { //alert( 'verty[i] - ' + verty[i] + ' testy - ' + testy + ' verty[j] - ' + verty[j] + ' testx - ' + testx); if( ( ( verty[i] > testy ) != ( verty[j] > testy ) ) && ( testx < ( vertx[j] - vertx[i] ) * ( testy - verty[i] ) / ( verty[j] - verty[i] ) + vertx[i] ) ) { c = !c; alert('Condition true') } } return c; } – Dheeraj Feb 7 '10 at 6:48
  • 1
    Awesome.. thanks for that converting that code.. works a treat. – Duncan_m Oct 3 '12 at 4:21
10

For the circle case it is very easy, just just check if the distance from the point to the center is less than (oet) the radius:

function intersects(x, y, cx, cy, r) {
    var dx = x-cx
    var dy = y-cy
    return dx*dx+dy*dy <= r*r
}

For the polygon, the easiest way is to imagine a line going straight up form the point. If this line crosses an odd number of polygon borders, your point is inside the polygon. (It would just cross one polygon border for a simple convex polygon)

You might also be able to find a third party geometry library, but it will likely take you more time than, than coding it yourself.

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2

I'd have a look at the isPointInPath method.

It will require you to plot the path onto a 'canvas' element, but there's a good chance that you want to be doing that anyway to render it. If you don't need to render your polygon on a canvas you can create an invisible canvas element (create it but never add it to the DOM).

var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas'); // Or document.createElement('canvas');
var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');
ctx.beginPath();
for (var i = 0; i < coords.length; i++) {
    ctx.lineTo(coords[i].x, coords[i].y);
}
ctx.isPointInPath(50,50);

Assuming you have an array of coordinate objects with x and y properties on them the above code should tell you if the point (50, 50) lies within the bounds of your shape.

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  • Is this soution responsive? If I resize the browser window, will it still work accurately? – Mawg says reinstate Monica Feb 27 '17 at 13:53
  • @Mawg no, this operates on an array of coordinates for the shape and a point. It has no relation to layout. – Peter Westmacott Feb 27 '17 at 20:30
  • Hnmmmm ... create a shadow copy of each path, catch resize events and scale the copy path accordingly, and when the user clicks X,Y, call isPointInPath() on the scaled copy? Would that work? – Mawg says reinstate Monica Feb 27 '17 at 20:36
  • 1
    Sounds like it might, but it might not be the most elegant solution. Have you considered SVG - then you can attach listeners to mouse hover events. – Peter Westmacott Feb 28 '17 at 11:25
  • That sounds like a very good idea. Why doesn't everyone use SVG for images which need to handle mouse clicks, on pages which need to be responsive to resizing? The first Google search result I looked at shows how easilly it works - tutorialspoint.com/svg/svg_interactivity.htm – Mawg says reinstate Monica Feb 28 '17 at 12:55
1

Circles are easy, just check that the distance from the point to the center of the circle is less than the radius of the circle using the Pythagorean theorem (see also this question).

Polygons are more challenging. That article links to C code to do it, which should be translate-able to JavaScript.

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0

I assembled an example with the above function: http://jsfiddle.net/jcspader/Vz6ka/

var gDrawingContext = $("canvas")[0].getContext("2d");


gDrawingContext.beginPath();
gDrawingContext.arc(50, 50, 10, 0, Math.PI*2, false);
gDrawingContext.closePath();
gDrawingContext.strokeStyle = "red";
gDrawingContext.stroke();

gDrawingContext.beginPath();
gDrawingContext.arc(55, 55, 10, 0, Math.PI*2, false);
gDrawingContext.closePath();
gDrawingContext.strokeStyle = "blue";
gDrawingContext.stroke();

function intersects(x, y, cx, cy, r) {
    var dx = x-cx
    var dy = y-cy
    return dx*dx+dy*dy <= r*r
}
console.clear();
$("canvas").on("click", function (e){
    if (intersects(e.pageX, e.pageY, 55, 55, 10))
    console.info(e.pageX + ", " + e.pageY );
});
| improve this answer | |

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