15

I am just starting JS, and understand the concept of finding a factor. However, this snippet of code is what I have so far. I have the str variable that outputs nothing but the first factor which is 2. I am trying to add each (int) to the str as a list of factors. What's the wrong in below code snippet?

function calculate(num) {
    var str = "";
    var int = 2;
    if (num % int == 0) {
        str = str + int;
        int++;
    } else {
        int++;
    }
    alert(str);
}

calculate(232);
4
  • 3
    In order to run the factoring code more than once, you will need some kind of loop, correct? – Davin Tryon Mar 2 '14 at 16:15
  • You're just testing one value. – Pointy Mar 2 '14 at 16:15
  • 1
    Use Recursion to find factor.. – ashbuilds Mar 2 '14 at 16:16
  • @AshishMishra What does recursion bring to the table? – Lee Taylor Jul 3 '18 at 23:01

13 Answers 13

31

UPDATED ES6 version:

As @gengns suggested in the comments a simpler way to generate the array would be to use the spread operator and the keys method:

const factors = number => [...Array(number + 1).keys()].filter(i=>number % i === 0);
console.log(factors(36));      //  [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36]

ES6 version:

const factors = number => Array
    .from(Array(number + 1), (_, i) => i)
    .filter(i => number % i === 0)

console.log(factors(36));      //  [1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36]

https://jsfiddle.net/1bkpq17b/

  • Array(number) creates an empty array of [number] places

  • Array.from(arr, (_, i) => i) populates the empty array with values according to position [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]

  • .filter(i => ...) filters the populated [0,1,2,3,4,5] array to the elements which satisfy the condition of number % i === 0 which leaves only the numbers that are the factors of the original number.

Note that you can go just until Math.floor(number/2) for efficiency purposes if you deal with big numbers (or small).

4
  • 1
    If 1 is a factor, shouldn't 36 also be a factor? So, Array(number + 1)? – Jonathan Rys May 9 '18 at 16:06
  • @JonathanRys true – Guy May 9 '18 at 20:47
  • 2
    Nice, very elegant, what about using [...Array(number + 1).keys()] instead of Array.from(Array(number + 1), (_, i) => i) – gengns Jul 3 '18 at 10:46
  • If you don't need to handle the special case of 0 being a factor of itself you could move the "+ 1" to the initialization rather than the allocation. This would start the search from 1 in stead of 0 but still keep 36 as a factor of itself. .from(Array(number), (_, i) => i + 1) – DOOMDUDEMX Nov 20 '19 at 8:28
11

@Moob's answer is correct. You must use a loop. However, you can speed up the process by determining if each number is even or odd. Odd numbers don't need to be checked against every number like evens do. Odd numbers can be checked against every-other number. Also, we don't need to check past half the given number as nothing above half will work. Excluding 0 and starting with 1:

function calculate(num) {
    
    var half = Math.floor(num / 2), // Ensures a whole number <= num.
        str = '1', // 1 will be a part of every solution.
        i, j;
    
    // Determine our increment value for the loop and starting point.
    num % 2 === 0 ? (i = 2, j = 1) : (i = 3, j = 2);
    
    for (i; i <= half; i += j) {
        num % i === 0 ? str += ',' + i : false;
    }

    str += ',' + num; // Always include the original number.
    console.log(str);
}

calculate(232);

http://jsfiddle.net/r8wh715t/

While I understand in your particular case (calculating 232) computation speed isn't a factor (<-- no pun intended), it could be an issue for larger numbers or multiple calculations. I was working on Project Euler problem #12 where I needed this type of function and computation speed was crucial.

2
  • 1
    you can drastically reduce computation by comparing your for loop against i * i <= num instead of i <= half, and using the value of i to calculate its pairing factor. calculate(300) goes from +-150 iterations to 15. – Larry Apr 4 '17 at 10:18
  • 1
    I would recommend against using the ternary operator here, just use an if statement. – Max Strater Dec 22 '17 at 2:33
11

As an even more performant complement to @the-quodesmith's answer, once you have a factor, you know immediately what its pairing product is:

function getFactors(num) {
  const isEven = num % 2 === 0;
  const max = Math.sqrt(num);
  const inc = isEven ? 1 : 2;
  let factors = [1, num];

  for (let curFactor = isEven ? 2 : 3; curFactor <= max; curFactor += inc) {
    if (num % curFactor !== 0) continue;
    factors.push(curFactor);
    let compliment = num / curFactor;
    if (compliment !== curFactor) factors.push(compliment);
  }

  return factors;
}

for getFactors(300) this will run the loop only 15 times, as opposed to +-150 for the original.

2
  • 5
    You might consider a different condition in the for loop to avoid invoking Math.pow() for every run by using Math.sqrt(). One can use const root = Math.sqrt(num); before the loop and use curFactor <= root in the for condition. – Nicholas Apr 20 '17 at 14:32
  • 2
    I'm pretty sure this will add 1 to the factors twice for num = 1, since there's the unchecked let factors = [1, num];. – Hutch Moore May 31 '18 at 18:43
9

function calculate(num) {
    var str = "0";
    for (var i = 1; i <= num; i++) {
        if (num % i == 0) {
            str += ',' + i;
        }
    }
    alert(str);
}

calculate(232);

http://jsfiddle.net/67qmt/

1

Below is an implementation with the time complexity O(sqrt(N)):

function(A) {
  var output = [];

  for (var i=1; i <= Math.sqrt(A); i++) {
    if (A % i === 0) {
      output.push(i);

      if (i !== Math.sqrt(A)) output.push(A/i);
    }
  }

  if (output.indexOf(A) === -1) output.push(A);

  return output;
}
1

here is a performance friendly version with complexity O(sqrt(N)). Output is a sorted array without using sort.

var factors = (num) => {
let fac = [], i = 1, ind = 0;

while (i <= Math.floor(Math.sqrt(num))) {
  //inserting new elements in the middle using splice
  if (num%i === 0) {
    fac.splice(ind,0,i);
    if (i != num/i) {
      fac.splice(-ind,0,num/i);
    }
    ind++;
  }
  i++;
}

//swapping first and last elements
let temp = fac[fac.length - 1];
fac[fac.length - 1] = fac[0];
fac[0] = temp;

// nice sorted array of factors
return fac;
};
console.log(factors(100));

Output: [ 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, 100 ]

1

This got me an 85% on Codility (Fails on the upperlimit, over a billion).

Reducing the input by half doesn't work well on large numbers as half is still a very large loop. So I used an object to keep track of the number and it's half value, meaning that we can reduce the loop to one quarter as we work from both ends simultaneously. N=24 becomes: (1&24),(2&12),(3&8),(4&6)

function solution(N) {

    const factors = {};

     let num = 1;  
     let finished = false;
     while(!finished)
     {
         if(factors[num] !== undefined)
         {
             finished = true;
         }
         else if(Number.isInteger(N/num))
         {

          factors[num] = 0;
          factors[N/num]= 0;
         }
        num++
     }

    return Object.keys(factors).length;
}
0
function factorialize(num) {
 var result = '';
  if( num === 0){
    return 1;
  }else{
    var myNum = [];

  for(i = 1; i <= num; i++){
    myNum.push(i);
    result = myNum.reduce(function(pre,cur){
      return pre * cur;
    });
  }
     return result;
    }
}

factorialize(9);
0

I came looking for an algorithm for this for use in factoring quadratic equations, meaning I need to consider both positive and negative numbers and factors. The below function does that and returns a list of factor pairs. Fiddle.

function getFactors(n) {
  if (n === 0) {return "∞";} // Deal with 0
  if (n % 1 !== 0) {return "The input must be an integer.";} // Deal with non-integers

  // Check only up to the square root of the absolute value of n
  // All factors above that will pair with factors below that
  var absval_of_n = Math.abs(n),
      sqrt_of_n = Math.sqrt(absval_of_n),
      numbers_to_check = [];
  for (var i=1; i <= sqrt_of_n; i++) {
    numbers_to_check.push(i);
  }

  // Create an array of factor pairs
  var factors = [];
  for (var i=0; i <= numbers_to_check.length; i++) {
    if (absval_of_n % i === 0) {
      // Include both positive and negative factors
      if (n>0) {
        factors.push([i, absval_of_n/i]);
        factors.push([-i, -absval_of_n/i]);
      } else {
        factors.push([-i, absval_of_n/i]);
        factors.push([i, -absval_of_n/i]);
      }
    }
  }

  // Test for the console
  console.log("FACTORS OF "+n+":\n"+
              "There are "+factors.length+" factor pairs.");
  for (var i=0; i<factors.length; i++) {
    console.log(factors[i]);
  }

  return factors;
}

getFactors(-26);
0
function calculate(num){
    var str = "0"   // initializes a place holder for var str
      for(i=2;i<num;i++){     
        var num2 = num%i;
        if(num2 ==0){       
            str = str +i; // this line joins the factors to the var str
        }
    }
    str1 = str.substr(1) //This removes the initial --var str = "0" at line 2
    console.log(str1) 
}
calculate(232);

//Output 2482958116
0

Here's an optimized solution using best practices, proper code style/readability, and returns the results in an ordered array.

function getFactors(num) {
    const maxFactorNum = Math.floor(Math.sqrt(num));
    const factorArr = [];
    let count = 0;  //count of factors found < maxFactorNum.

    for (let i = 1; i <= maxFactorNum; i++) {
        //inserting new elements in the middle using splice
        if (num % i === 0) {
            factorArr.splice(count, 0, i);
            let otherFactor = num / i; //the other factor
            if (i != otherFactor) {
                //insert these factors in the front of the array
                factorArr.splice(-count, 0, otherFactor);
            }
            count++;
        }
    }

    //swapping first and last elements
    let lastIndex = factorArr.length - 1;
    let temp = factorArr[lastIndex];
    factorArr[lastIndex] = factorArr[0];
    factorArr[0] = temp;

    return factorArr;
}

console.log(getFactors(100));
console.log(getFactors(240));
console.log(getFactors(600851475143)); //large number used in Project Euler.

I based my answer on the answer written by @Harman

0

function primeFactors(n) {
  let arrPrime = [2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79];
  let divisor = 2,
    divided = n,
    arr = [],
    count = 0, out = "";
  while (divisor < n) {
    if (divided % divisor == 0) {
      arr.push(divisor)
      divided /= divisor;
      console.log(divisor);
    }
    else {
      divisor++;
    }
  }
  console.log(count);
  // let news = arr.filter(num => num != ",")
  // console.log(news);
  // arr.slice(indexOf(map(",")), 1)
  return arr;
}

let out = primeFactors(86240);
console.log(out);

1
  • 1
    add some explanation for better understand – ßãlãjî Sep 11 '20 at 15:36
-1
function factorialize(num) { 
 if(num === 0)
   return 1; 
 var arr = []; 
 for(var i=1; i<= num; i++){
   arr.push(i);
 } 
 num = arr.reduce(function(preVal, curVal){
   return preVal * curVal;
 });

  return num;
}

factorialize(5);
2
  • While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Badacadabra Jun 1 '17 at 14:45
  • The question is asking about the factors, not the factorialization, of a number. – Vincent Jul 23 '17 at 22:01

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