Can anybody tell me what daemon threads are in Java?

24 Answers 24

A daemon thread is a thread that does not prevent the JVM from exiting when the program finishes but the thread is still running. An example for a daemon thread is the garbage collection.

You can use the setDaemon(boolean) method to change the Thread daemon properties before the thread starts.

  • 190
    For posterity, setDamon(boolean) can only be called before the thread has been started. By default the thread inherits the daemon status of its parent thread. – Gray Nov 30 '11 at 13:47
  • "does not prevent the JVM from exiting when the program finishes but the thread is still running" while @sateesh says that "JVM halts any remaining daemon threads are abandoned". So do daemon threads finish running when JVM exits? – Gerald Oct 16 '15 at 3:09
  • 15
    @Gerald, ALL threads are killed when the JVM exits. B_erb said, "...when the program finishes." What that means is, if the program does not explicitly kill the JVM, then the JVM will automatically kill itself when the last non-daemon thread ends. Normal threads define "when the program exits." Daemon threads don't. – Solomon Slow Dec 18 '15 at 0:23
  • 1
    @Gray Nice to know this.. but small thing setDaemon(boolean).. 'e' is missed. – Venkatesh Goud Jan 15 '16 at 4:58
  • So this line thread that does not prevent the JVM from exiting when the program finishes but the thread is still running basically means the JVM process that started the thread doesn't care if the daemon thread finished executing or not, it will just end itself if all the normal threads have finished execution. – Bhargav Apr 21 '17 at 12:00

A few more points (Reference: Java Concurrency in Practice)

  • When a new thread is created it inherits the daemon status of its parent.
  • When all non-daemon threads finish, the JVM halts, and any remaining daemon threads are abandoned:

    • finally blocks are not executed,
    • stacks are not unwound - the JVM just exits.

    Due to this reason daemon threads should be used sparingly, and it is dangerous to use them for tasks that might perform any sort of I/O.

  • 3
    Why shouldn't daemon threads be used for I/O? Is it a concern about BufferedWriters etc not being flushed? – Paul Cager Jul 26 '13 at 10:04
  • 3
    @PaulCager Yeah, they can just get cut off at the knees in the middle of a write/read as well. – Cruncher Sep 11 '13 at 17:33
  • 41
    The second point is nonsense. When the JVM halts, all threads die and no finally blocks are executed, regardless of whether the threads are daemon or not. So don’t call System.exit(…) if you think there might be running threads doing I/O. The only difference is that the JVM will trigger its own termination when only daemon threads are left. – Holger Jun 2 '14 at 10:41
  • 8
    What is meant by "stacks are not unwound"? – ɢʜʘʂʈ ʀɛɔʘɴ May 21 '15 at 12:32
  • 2
    @ɢʜʘʂʈʀɛɔʘɴ there are some explanations out there on "unwinding stacks," including this one: flylib.com/books/en/2.254.1.277/1 – user766353 Aug 18 '15 at 20:18

All the above answers are good. Here's a simple little code snippet, to illustrate the difference. Try it with each of the values of true and false in setDaemon.

public class DaemonTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new WorkerThread().start();

        try {
            Thread.sleep(7500);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // handle here exception
        }

        System.out.println("Main Thread ending") ;
    }

}

class WorkerThread extends Thread {

    public WorkerThread() {
        // When false, (i.e. when it's a user thread),
        // the Worker thread continues to run.
        // When true, (i.e. when it's a daemon thread),
        // the Worker thread terminates when the main 
        // thread terminates.
        setDaemon(true); 
    }

    public void run() {
        int count = 0;

        while (true) {
            System.out.println("Hello from Worker "+count++);

            try {
                sleep(5000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // handle exception here
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    @russ Good code snippet! I had to define WorkerThread class as static though. – xli Oct 31 '13 at 20:13
  • @xli you could have done new DaemonTest().new WorkerThread().start() too :) – iabhi Jul 21 '16 at 6:17
  • @russ good example. I was aware of that the default one is "setDeamon(false)" if you do not explicitly define "setDaemon(true)" – huseyin Jul 23 '17 at 11:20
  • Very very beautiful example. Enjoy an upvote. – Tahir Hussain Mir 7 hours ago

Traditionally daemon processes in UNIX were those that were constantly running in background, much like services in Windows.

A daemon thread in Java is one that doesn't prevent the JVM from exiting. Specifically the JVM will exit when only daemon threads remain. You create one by calling the setDaemon() method on Thread.

Have a read of Daemon threads.

  • 3
    your link is dead at this point of time, perhaps you want to update? anyway, +1 for you. – Jasonw Jul 6 '12 at 8:04
  • 4
    link works for me – Jeshurun Jun 26 '13 at 6:59
  • 2
    I like the comparison between UNIX and Windows. – Premraj Jul 24 '15 at 5:49
  • Best explanation here! – LoveMeow Aug 28 '17 at 11:18

Daemon threads are like a service providers for other threads or objects running in the same process as the daemon thread. Daemon threads are used for background supporting tasks and are only needed while normal threads are executing. If normal threads are not running and remaining threads are daemon threads then the interpreter exits.

For example, the HotJava browser uses up to four daemon threads named "Image Fetcher" to fetch images from the file system or network for any thread that needs one.

Daemon threads are typically used to perform services for your application/applet (such as loading the "fiddley bits"). The core difference between user threads and daemon threads is that the JVM will only shut down a program when all user threads have terminated. Daemon threads are terminated by the JVM when there are no longer any user threads running, including the main thread of execution.

setDaemon(true/false) ? This method is used to specify that a thread is daemon thread.

public boolean isDaemon() ? This method is used to determine the thread is daemon thread or not.

Eg:

public class DaemonThread extends Thread {
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("Entering run method");

        try {
            System.out.println("In run Method: currentThread() is" + Thread.currentThread());

            while (true) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(500);
                } catch (InterruptedException x) {}

                System.out.println("In run method: woke up again");
            }
        } finally {
            System.out.println("Leaving run Method");
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Entering main Method");

        DaemonThread t = new DaemonThread();
        t.setDaemon(true);
        t.start();

        try {
            Thread.sleep(3000);
        } catch (InterruptedException x) {}

        System.out.println("Leaving main method");
    }

}

OutPut:

C:\java\thread>javac DaemonThread.java

C:\java\thread>java DaemonThread
Entering main Method
Entering run method
In run Method: currentThread() isThread[Thread-0,5,main]
In run method: woke up again
In run method: woke up again
In run method: woke up again
In run method: woke up again
In run method: woke up again
In run method: woke up again
Leaving main method

C:\j2se6\thread>

A daemon thread is a thread that is considered doing some tasks in the background like handling requests or various chronjobs that can exist in an application.

When your program only have daemon threads remaining it will exit. That's because usually these threads work together with normal threads and provide background handling of events.

You can specify that a Thread is a daemon one by using setDaemon method, they usually don't exit, neither they are interrupted.. they just stop when application stops.

  • 1
    It's because it's a daemon thread, and that is the meaning of 'daemon'. Your reasoning is back to front. – user207421 Mar 30 '17 at 23:03

Definition of Daemon(Computing):

A background process that handles requests for services such as print spooling and file transfers, and is dormant when not required. Source

What is Daemon thread in java?

  • Daemon threads can shut down any time in between their flow, Non-Daemon i.e. user thread executes completely.
  • Daemon threads executes at a low priority.
  • Daemon threads are threads that run intermittently in the background as long as other non-daemon threads are running.
  • When all of the non-daemon threads complete, daemon threads terminates automatically.
  • Daemon threads are service providers for user threads running in the same process.
  • The JVM does not care about daemon threads to complete when in Running state, not even finally block also let execute. JVM do give preference to non-daemon threads that is created by us.
  • Daemon threads acts as services in Windows.
  • The JVM stops the daemon threads when all user threads (in contrast to the daemon threads) are terminated. Hence daemon threads can be used to implement, for example, a monitoring functionality as the thread is stopped by the JVM as soon as all user threads have stopped.
  • if you call System.exit(), no finally blocks are executed, regardless of the thread being a daemon thread. indeed finally blocks are executed in daemon threads even after the last user thread terminates if the JVM did not kill the thread yet – benez Mar 25 '16 at 19:55
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    A daemon thread executes at the same priority as its creating thread, unless it has been changed prior to starting. Daemon threads aren't necessarily 'service providers' or Windows services or anything else stated here: they are just threads that don't prevent the JVM from exiting. Period. – user207421 Mar 30 '17 at 23:08

One misconception I would like to clarify:

  • Assume that if daemon thread (say B) is created within user thread (say A); then ending of this user thread/parent thread (A) will not end the daemon thread/child thread (B) it has created; provided user thread is the only one currently running.
  • So there is no parent-child relationship on thread ending. All daemon threads (irrespective of where it is created) will end once there is no single live user thread and that causes JVM to terminate.
  • Even this is true for both (parent/child) are daemon threads.
  • If a child thread created from a daemon thread then that is also a daemon thread. This won't need any explicit daemon thread flag setting. Similarly if a child thread created from a user thread then that is also a user thread, if you want to change it, then explicit daemon flag setting is needed before start of that child thread.
  • This ins't quoted from anything. Don't use quote formatting for text that isn't quoted. First paragraph of the 'quotation' is incorrect, and contradicts the second. – user207421 Mar 30 '17 at 23:05
  • @EJP GOT IT, So every one has to give other people quotation here, not their own. OR ourselves has quote somewhere then point here ? – Kanagavelu Sugumar Mar 31 '17 at 7:02

Java has a special kind of thread called daemon thread.

  • Very low priority.
  • Only executes when no other thread of the same program is running.
  • JVM ends the program finishing these threads, when daemon threads are the only threads running in a program.

What are daemon threads used for?

Normally used as service providers for normal threads. Usually have an infinite loop that waits for the service request or performs the tasks of the thread. They can’t do important jobs. (Because we don't know when they are going to have CPU time and they can finish any time if there aren't any other threads running. )

A typical example of these kind of threads is the Java garbage collector.

There's more...

  • You only call the setDaemon() method before you call the start() method. Once the thread is running, you can’t modify its daemon status.
  • Use isDaemon() method to check if a thread is a daemon thread or a user thread.
  • 4
    -1, I don't believe that a daemon thread is inherently low-priority. Certainly no documentation I've seen states such. Also this SO answer claims that priority and daemon-ness are orthogonal: stackoverflow.com/a/10298353/839128 – MikeFHay Feb 9 '15 at 11:01
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    Daemon threads have nothing to do with priority. You can have a high priority daemon thread or a low priority non-daemon thread. – Gray Jan 15 '16 at 13:28
  • A daemon thread initially has the same priority as its creating thread. – user207421 Mar 30 '17 at 23:04

Daemon Thread and User Threads. Generally all threads created by programmer are user thread (unless you specify it to be daemon or your parent thread is a daemon thread). User thread are generally meant to run our programm code. JVM doesn't terminates unless all the user thread terminate.

Daemon threads are like assistants. Non-Daemon threads are like front performers. Assistants help performers to complete a job. When the job is completed, no help is needed by performers to perform anymore. As no help is needed the assistants leave the place. So when the jobs of Non-Daemon threads is over, Daemon threads march away.

Daemon thread is just like a normal thread except that the JVM will only shut down when the other non daemon threads are not existing. Daemon threads are typically used to perform services for your application.

Daemon thread in Java are those thread which runs in background and mostly created by JVM for performing background task like Garbage collection and other house keeping tasks.

Points to Note :

  1. Any thread created by main thread, which runs main method in Java is by default non daemon because Thread inherits its daemon nature from the Thread which creates it i.e. parent Thread and since main thread is a non daemon thread, any other thread created from it will remain non-daemon until explicitly made daemon by calling setDaemon(true).

  2. Thread.setDaemon(true) makes a Thread daemon but it can only be called before starting Thread in Java. It will throw IllegalThreadStateException if corresponding Thread is already started and running.

Difference between Daemon and Non Daemon thread in Java :

1) JVM doesn't wait for any daemon thread to finish before existing.

2) Daemon Thread are treated differently than User Thread when JVM terminates, finally blocks are not called, Stacks are not unwounded and JVM just exits.

Daemon threads are as everybody explained, will not constrain JVM to exit, so basically its a happy thread for Application from exit point of view.

Want to add that daemon threads can be used when say I'm providing an API like pushing data to a 3rd party server / or JMS, I might need to aggregate data at the client JVM level and then send to JMS in a separate thread. I can make this thread as daemon thread, if this is not a mandatory data to be pushed to server. This kind of data is like log push / aggregation.

Regards, Manish

Daemon thread is like daemon process which is responsible for managing resources,a daemon thread is created by the Java VM to serve the user threads. example updating system for unix,unix is daemon process. child of daemon thread is always daemon thread,so by default daemon is false.you can check thread as daemon or user by using "isDaemon()" method. so daemon thread or daemon process are basically responsible for managing resources. for example when you starting jvm there is garbage collector running that is daemon thread whose priority is 1 that is lowest,which is managing memory. jvm is alive as long as user thread is alive,u can not kill daemon thread.jvm is responsible to kill daemon threads.

  • Very confused, and all the 'so's are non sequiturs. – user207421 Mar 30 '17 at 23:09

Daemon threads are generally known as "Service Provider" thread. These threads should not be used to execute program code but system code. These threads run parallel to your code but JVM can kill them anytime. When JVM finds no user threads, it stops it and all daemon threads terminate instantly. We can set non-daemon thread to daemon using :

setDaemon(true)
  • 1
    They are not 'generally known as "Service Provider" threads'. – user207421 Jan 7 '17 at 17:46
  • And they can be used to execute any code. The JVM cannot 'kill them any time', but it will kill them when there are no non-daemon threads running. – user207421 Mar 30 '17 at 23:12
  • @EJP maybe I am wrong but "it will kill them" when non-daemon threads running. When a thread is daemon, isn't it running separately holding the jvm until it executes completely and is now managed at OS level . – 89n3ur0n Jun 27 '17 at 11:57

In Java, Daemon Threads are one of the types of the thread which does not prevent Java Virtual Machine (JVM) from exiting. The main purpose of a daemon thread is to execute background task especially in case of some routine periodic task or work. With JVM exits, daemon thread also dies.

By setting a thread.setDaemon(true), a thread becomes a daemon thread. However, you can only set this value before the thread start.

  • What are the other types of thread that do that? A: None. There are daemon threads and non-daemon threads, period. It is a binary, Two states. – user207421 Mar 30 '17 at 23:14

Daemon threads are threads that run in the background as long as other non-daemon threads of the process are still running. Thus, when all of the non-daemon threads complete, the daemon threads are terminated. An example for the non-daemon thread is the thread running the Main. A thread is made daemon by calling the setDaemon() method before the thread is started

For More Reference : Daemon thread in Java

  • your blog link doesn't works.. – John Oct 21 '15 at 8:29

Any Java thread can be a daemon thread.

Daemon threads are service providers for other threads running in the same process as the daemon thread. For example, the HotJava browser uses up to four daemon threads named "Image Fetcher" to fetch images from the file system or network for any thread that needs one. The run() method for a daemon thread is typically an infinite loop that waits for a service request. When the only remaining threads in a process are daemon threads, the interpreter exits. This makes sense because when only daemon threads remain, there is no other thread for which a daemon thread can provide a service.

To specify that a thread is a daemon thread, call the setDaemon method with the argument true. To determine if a thread is a daemon thread, use the accessor method isDaemon.

Hope this may help!!!!!!

For me, daemon thread it's like house keeper for user threads. If all user threads finished , the daemon thread has no job and killed by JVM. I explained it in the YouTube video.

Let's talk only in code with working examples. I like russ's answer above but to remove any doubt I had, I enhanced it a little bit. I ran it twice, once with the worker thread set to deamon true (deamon thread) and another time set it to false (user thread). It confirms that the deamon thread ends when the main thread terminates.

public class DeamonThreadTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    new WorkerThread(false).start();    //set it to true and false and run twice.

    try {
        Thread.sleep(7500);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // handle here exception
    }

    System.out.println("Main Thread ending");
    }
   }

   class WorkerThread extends Thread {

    boolean isDeamon;

    public WorkerThread(boolean isDeamon) {
        // When false, (i.e. when it's a user thread),
        // the Worker thread continues to run.
        // When true, (i.e. when it's a daemon thread),
        // the Worker thread terminates when the main
        // thread terminates.
        this.isDeamon = isDeamon;
        setDaemon(isDeamon);
    }

    public void run() {
        System.out.println("I am a " + (isDeamon ? "Deamon Thread" : "User Thread (none-deamon)"));

        int counter = 0;

        while (counter < 10) {
            counter++;
            System.out.println("\tworking from Worker thread " + counter++);

            try {
                sleep(5000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // handle exception here
            }
        }
        System.out.println("\tWorker thread ends. ");
    }
}



result when setDeamon(true)
=====================================
I am a Deamon Thread
    working from Worker thread 0
    working from Worker thread 1
Main Thread ending

Process finished with exit code 0


result when setDeamon(false)
=====================================
I am a User Thread (none-deamon)
    working from Worker thread 0
    working from Worker thread 1
Main Thread ending
    working from Worker thread 2
    working from Worker thread 3
    working from Worker thread 4
    working from Worker thread 5
    working from Worker thread 6
    working from Worker thread 7
    working from Worker thread 8
    working from Worker thread 9
    Worker thread ends. 

Process finished with exit code 0

JVM will accomplish the work when a last non-daemon thread execution is completed. By default, JVM will create a thread as nondaemon but we can make Thread as a daemon with help of method setDaemon(true). A good example of Daemon thread is GC thread which will complete his work as soon as all nondaemon threads are completed.

  • how can that be how the GC thread works? Doesn't garbage collection run even if the program's main thread takes a very long time (main thread doesn't terminate)? – Calicoder May 10 at 22:06
  • As I mentioned GC thread will work till the end of last NON daemon thread will accomplish it’s execution. The program’s main thread is not daemon as we know hence GC thread will accomplish the work once main thread is completed/killed. Basically I want to say that daemon thread(s) will terminated when process is completed, and process is completed when all non daemon threads are executed. – Arman Tumanyan May 10 at 22:10

Daemon threads die when the creator thread exits.

Non-daemon threads (default) can even live longer than the main thread.

if ( threadShouldDieOnApplicationEnd ) {
    thread.setDaemon ( true );
}
thread.start();

Here is an example to test behavior of daemon threads in case of jvm exit due to non existence of user threads.

Please note second last line in the output below, when main thread exited, daemon thread also died and did not print finally executed9 statement within finally block. This means that any i/o resources closed within finally block of a daemon thread will not be closed if JVM exits due to non existence of user threads.

public class DeamonTreadExample {

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {

    Thread t = new Thread(() -> {
        int count = 0;
        while (true) {
            count++;
            try {
                System.out.println("inside try"+ count);
                Thread.currentThread().sleep(1000);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } finally {
                System.out.println("finally executed"+ count);
            }
        }
    });
    t.setDaemon(true);
    t.start();

    Thread.currentThread().sleep(10000);
    System.out.println("main thread exited");
  }
}

Output

inside try1
finally executed1
inside try2
finally executed2
inside try3
finally executed3
inside try4
finally executed4
inside try5
finally executed5
inside try6
finally executed6
inside try7
finally executed7
inside try8
finally executed8
inside try9
finally executed9
inside try10
main thread exited

protected by Mat Aug 25 '13 at 12:21

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